August 2018 - chiropracticforward August 2018 - chiropracticforward

Month: August 2018

CF 037: Stretching Before Playing. What’s the Verdict?

Stretching Before Playing. What’s the Verdict?

Integrating Chiropractors

Today we’re going to talk about stretching before playing. We’ll go through some research and hopefully give you a general idea of what is the right recommendation to make to your patients. 

But first, here’s that bumper music

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

Now that we are locked in and rocking, I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. It’s just an email. We don’t sell it, we won’t use it any more than once per week when a new episode comes out, and it’s the best way for lots of you to get a reminder when episodes go live. 

Did you know that I literally get more emails from myself than I get from anyone else? It’s true. As soon as I think of something that needs to get done, I send myself an email. Muy pronto. If I don’t, it’ll be gone in the ether. Like a wisp of smoke. It’s there and then swoosh….it’s gone. Lol. That may be just a consequence of aging but it’s been that way for some time now. We just learn how to deal with those things and develop the coping mechanisms that allow life to continue as unimpeded as possible. 

Back to school, yes, we have the knuckleheads back in school and, while they were unhappy, I was all smiles inside. I love being on a schedule and school offers that regimented, timetable type of deal. That’s what I operate best under. When the kids are here, there, and everywhere, I just lose my mind a little honestly so, for my colleagues that have kids…..hell yeah.

We made it through Summer. 

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

You have high-stepped right into Episode #37

I mentioned some time ago that I really enjoy some of the private groups on Facebook. Specifically, I enjoy the Forward Thinking Chiropractic Alliance and the Evidence-based Chiropractic Facebook groups. I would be crazy to fail to mention our OWN private Facebook group which is called oddly enough the Chiropractic Forward Facebook group. 

??Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

You can learn so much stuff you weren’t even expecting to find out or didn’t even know you didn’t know. That’s the best kind of learning I think. 

Stretching Before Playing

On that note. In one of those groups, there was a discussion not too long ago on stretching before playing or participating in an athletic event. When I was an athlete from elementary age all the way through college, we stretched. We stretched a lot. 

In playing football in college, I couldn’t tell you whether stretching before playing made any difference in game time performance because there was never an opportunity to NOT stretch. 

However, I actually won state here in Texas in the discus and competed at state in the shot put when I was in high school and I can tell you from personal experience and from knowing my body very well back then…..I always felt weaker when I stretched before an event.

Luckily, we were allowed to kind of do our own thing in track and field when it came to warm-ups and I started avoiding stretching purely based on the way it made me feel weaker. Stretching before playing in my particular case was a no-go.

Peak Performance

I found I got a lot more use out of visualization and relaxing my mind. On that note, I had a college coach recommend a book to me that made all of the difference to me in regards to performance. It was called Peak Performance and authored by Charles A. Garfield.

It is a phenomenal book. Mostly because it didn’t offer general ideas on visualization and relaxation. It gave you specific, easy to use exercises that allowed you to get it and use it immediately. I can’t recommend it highly enough if you can still find it. I’m old now so my copy may one of the few left. But, I did leave a link in the show notes that takes you to a copy at Barnes and Noble if interested. 

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/p/peak-performance-charles-a-garfield/1002544001/2660075437651?st=PLA&sid=BNB_DRS_New+Marketplace+Shopping+Textbooks_00000000&2sid=Google_&sourceId=PLGoP164994&gclid=CjwKCAjw2MTbBRASEiwAdYIpsYwXv0NZHGrUz_0PwqMoqv50DDrvGEyioRTGr44p8jln__5aujnRaxoCKkEQAvD_BwE

Now, was my idea that stretching before playing made me weaker before a throwing event crazy or not? Let’s dive and see what the research has to say on it.

Since there are several papers to run over and our time is limited here, I will not be going very deeply into each paper. We will get the general ideas, I will cite them in the show notes for Episode 37 at chiropracticforward.com and, if you want to learn more, you can find the papers linked there or in our private Chiropractic Forward Facebook group. 

OK, let’s see what we have here. Let’s start with one called “Current concepts in muscle stretching for exercise and rehabilitation” by PT and PhD Phil Page[1]. It was published in the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy in February of 2012. 

Why They Did It

The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of stretching before playing and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation.

There are three muscle stretching techniques frequently described in the literature: Static, Dynamic, and Pre-Contraction stretches. 

Static stretching before playing is the probably the type of stretching we all commonly think of. It’s where you hold a specific position and tension or stretch the muscle or the muscle group. We hold it for 10 or so seconds and usually do that for 3 sets. Traditionally anyway. 

Next is Dynamic stretching before playing, which is characterized by either active or ballistic dynamic stretching. Active dynamic stretching involves moving a limb through its full range of motion to the end range and repeating it several times while Ballistic dynamic stretch involves rapid, alternating movements or “bouncing” at the end-range of the motion. Ballistic dynamic stretching is no longer recommended due to an increased risk of injury. 

The last of the three is Pre-contraction stretching before playing. This involves a contraction of the muscle being stretched or a contraction of its antagonist muscle before stretching. According to Dr. Page’s paper, the most common type of pre-contraction stretching is proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching.

There are several different types of PNF stretching including “contract-relax” (C-R), “hold relax” (H-R), and “contract-relax agonist contract” (CRAC); these are generally performed by having the patient or client contract the muscle being used during the technique at 75 to 100% of maximal contraction, holding for 10 seconds, and then relaxing.

This paper is all about any and all stretching before playing depending on the person and activity so there’s no real specificity in the recommendations but you can derive some generalizations here. 

For warm-up for sports and exercise purposes, Dr. Page says that static stretching is most beneficial for athletes requiring flexibility for their sports like gymnastics, dance, etc. He says that dynamic stretch may be better for athletes that will be running or jumping like basketball players or sprinters. However, he states that stretching has not been shown to reduce the incidence of overall injuries. 

Next, here’s one called “Effects of dynamic and static stretching on vertical jump performance and electromyographic activity” by PA Hough et. al. published in Journal of Strength Conditioning Research in 2009[2].

This was a randomized controlled trial. This one is actually older than the last one but I wanted to cover the last one prior to this one so that you’d know the differences in the types of stretching before playing. So…..on with the show here. 

Why They Did It

The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of static stretching and dynamic stretching on vertical jump performance and electromyographic activity of the vastus medialis.

What They Found

  • There was significantly greater EMG amplitude in the dynamic stretched individuals that the static stretch folks. 
  • The vertical jump was statistically greater in the dynamic stretch group than the static stretch as well. 
  • Static stretch actually has a negative influence on the vertical jump while dynamic has a positive impact. 

Wrap Up

“This investigation provides some physiological basis for the inclusion of DS and exclusion of SS in preparation for activities requiring jumping performance.”

Let’s keep it moving. Here’s one called “Effects of running, static stretching and practice jumps on explosive force production and jumping performance” by W.B. Young et. al. published in Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness in 2003[3]. 

Why They Did It

The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of running, static stretching of the leg extensors and practice jumps on explosive force production and jumping performance. 

What They Found

The results of this particular study showed that sub-maximum running and practice jumps had a positive effect whereas static stretching before playing had a negative influence on explosive force and jumping performance. It was suggested that an alternative for static stretching should be considered in warm-ups prior to power activities. 

That definitely confirms my personal experience back in track and field in high school. All we really knew back then was the static stretch. 

Right on into the next paper by JC Gergley called “Latent effect of passive static stretching on driver clubbed speed, distance, accuracy, and consistent ball contact in young male competitive golfers” published in Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research in 2010[4]. 

Why They Did It

This investigation was conducted to determine the effect of 2 different warm-up treatments over time on driver clubhead speed, distance, accuracy, and consistent ball contact in young male competitive golfers.

What They Found

The authors concluded, “The results of this inquiry strongly suggest that a total-body passive static stretching routine should be avoided before practice or competition in favor of a gradual active dynamic warmup with the clubs. Athletes with poor mechanics because of lack of flexibility should perform these exercises after a conditioning session, practice, or competition.”

We continue with “The acute effects of static stretching compared to dynamic stretching with and without an active warm-up on anaerobic performance” authored by Bradley Kendall and published in International Journal of Exercise Science in 2017[5].

Why They Did It

“The Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) has been used in many studies to determine anaerobic performance. However, there has been poor reporting of warm-up protocols and limited consistency between warm-up methods that have been used.

With the WAnT being such a commonly-used test, consistency in warm-up methods is essential in order to compare results across studies. Therefore, this study was designed to compare how static stretching, dynamic stretching, and an active warm-up affect WAnT performance.”

It was hypothesized that the dynamic stretching would lead to greater peak power than the static stretching protocol. However, results of post hoc analyses failed to detect a significant difference. For the other measured variables, no significant differences were found.

However, the Bonferroni adjustment is quite stringent and may have failed to detect a significance due to the small sample size in this study. When comparing dynamic stretching to static stretching, Cohen’s effect size suggested that dynamic stretching may have a small to moderate effect on performance.

The comparison between static and dynamic stretching before playing approached significance and had a small to moderate effect, supporting studies that have concluded dynamic stretching before playing to be more beneficial than static stretching prior to anaerobic performance output.”

And here we arrive at our last article called “Injury prevention and management among athletic populations: to stretch or not stretch?” by Kieran O’Sullivan and Sean McAulliffe of Ireland and Gregory Lehman of Canada. This article appeared in Aspetar Sports Medicine Journal in 2014[6]. 

Since this article is long, we won’t get too detailed here. We will hit the high spots and link it in the show notes for episode #37 at ChiropracticForward.com and hopefully, you can read it in depth 

http://www.aspetar.com/journal/upload/PDF/201412891228.pdf

Why They Wrote It

The authors wanted to discuss whether there is evidence that static stretch is worth including in athlete management.

I found it interesting to see a quote at the beginning of this article that said, “There is consistent evidence that SS increases flexibility in the short-term, although the gains in flexibility decrease relatively quickly, such that they are lost within 30 minutes.” 

They summarized static stretch as follows:

  • SS increases flexibility in both the short- and long-term
  • Flexibility is also increased by strength training, especially eccentric training.
  • Interestingly, strength training appears to increase both tendon stiffness and overall MTU stiffness, while simultaneously increasing ROM
  • Neither SS nor strength training appears to consistently decrease the stiffness of the joints.
  • none of the reviews showed a beneficial effect of SS on performance
  • Maximal strength appears to be more commonly negatively affected by SS than explosive muscular performance or power
  • Sustained SS does not appear to enhance running or walking efficiency even when ROM is increased. Results are equivocal with SS and endurance performance. In contrast, strength training consistently improves endurance performance
  • Acute SS for greater than 45 seconds should be avoided immediately before participation in activities where strength or power are important
  • Shorter durations of SS are also hard to justify immediately before participation in activities where strength or power are important
  • In endurance activities, acute SS is hard to justify immediately before participation as performance may be reduced
  • SS is far less effective than strength training in enhancing strength and power and it’s unclear whether adding SS might reduce the strength gains achieved, so why do it?
  • There is not sufficient evidence to endorse or discontinue routine stretching before or after exercise to prevent injury among competitive or recreational athletes
  • In terms of injury prevention, it appears SS has very little to offer and should not be used.
  • Alternatively, a meta- analysis showed that strength training reduced incidence of sports injuries to less than one third

They summarized the article by saying, “the only area in which SS might seem to offer a specific advantage is in the area of increasing flexibility. There may be times when the most important goal is enhancing flexibility (e.g. ballet) and in these isolated circumstances SS may be justifiable.

However, there remains a lack of evidence that gains are superior to those of a strength training programme. Even if strength training is eventually confirmed as being inferior to SS at increasing flexibility, the fact that strength training improves performance, pain, disability, injury and return to sports rates mean strength training must be a mainstay of athletic development and training, in contrast to SS.”

What a fascinating article. We only touched on a few of the larger ideas in the article but it’s FULL of information and learning. If sports and stretching are a part of your focus, the article is a must. Everything they talk about is cited properly so you can really dive in face first if you want. 

Great stuff folks. 

I’m going to say that my notion in high school, in my mind, has been confirmed. I just felt weaker if I performed static stretch for more than just a few seconds. Like the stretching just took the wind out of my sails. 

I’ve learned a ton through putting this podcast and I hope you have too! Hell, that’s what we’re here for right?

Go forward this week with more confidence in your recommendations for stretching before athletic activity. If we didn’t hit enough here for you, dive into the show notes and the citations at chiropracticforward.com Episode #37 and do some of your own homework. You’ll be better for it. I promise. 

Integrating Chiropractors

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability.

It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

??Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

??Social Media Links

??iTunes

??Player FM Link

??Stitcher:

??TuneIn

 

Enjoy other episodes of our Chiropractic Forward Podcast!

CF 020: Chiropractic Evolution or Extinction?

CF 030: Integrating Chiropractors – What’s It Going To Take?

CF 034: Chiropractic Information To Help You Form Your Practice

 

Bibliography

1. Page P, CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION. Int J Sports Phys Ther, 2012. 7(1): p. 109-119.

2. Hough PA, Effects of dynamic and static stretching on vertical jump performance and electromyographic activity. J Strength Cond Res, 2009. 23(2): p. 507-12.

3. Young WB, Effects of running, static stretching and practice jumps on explosive force production and jumping performance. J Sports Med Phys Fitness, 2003. 43: p. 21-7.

4. Gergley JC, Latent effect of passive static stretching on driver clubhead speed, distance, accuracy, and consistent ball contact in young male competitive golfers. J Strength Cond Res, 2010. 24(12): p. 3326-33.

5. Kendall B, The Acute Effects of Static Stretching Compared to Dynamic Stretching with and without an Active Warm up on Anaerobic Performance. Int J Exerc Sci, 2017. 10(1): p. 53-61.

6. O’Sullivan K, Injury prevention and management among athletic populations: To stretch or not stretch. Aspetar Sports Medicne Journal, 2014. 3(3): p. 624-628.

CF 036: A MishMash Of Research on Chiropractic, On Herniation, Trends, and Ineffectiveness

A MishMash Of Research on Chiropractic, On Herniation, Trends, and Ineffectiveness

Integrating Chiropractors

Today we’re going to talk about research on Chiropractic, research on health trends, and research on disc herniation as a result of a visit to your friendly neighborhood chiropractor. Is that real or is that a bunch of hooey? We’ll talk about it so come along. 

But first, here’s that bumper music

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

Now that I have you here, I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. Nope, I don’t have some big prize for you if you sign up. Not big offers. No magical marketing tactics with which to get your email address. Just what we hope is a podcast full of value to you and your business. 

Being on the newsletter list just makes it easier to let you know when the newest episode goes live and, maybe in the future we’ll have some cool stuff to offer those on our email list. Also, when someone new signs up it makes my heart leap and wouldn’t you like to be the one responsible for making someone’s heart leap today? 

Upcoming!

We have a lot of great guests lined up to come on the show! Next week I believe we are going to have Dr. Anthony Palumbo from Staten Island, New York. Dr. Palumbo is very active in the New York State Chiropractic Association and practices in a multidisciplinary practice. We’re going to have a good time picking his brain. 

The week after that, I believe we have Dr. Brandon Steele from ChiroUp and from the DACO program joining us. He’s an excellent resource for what is going on in our profession and where we see things heading in the future for chiropractic. I’m really looking forward to that one. 

We have the green light from Dr. Jerry Kennedy of the Black Sheep DC marketing program to come on the show. We just need to get that date lined up. We have Dr. Tim Bertlesman from the DACO program and also the President of the Illinois Chiropractic Association lined up down the road. 

Good stuff on the way so make sure you’re staying tuned into our little corner here in Podcast land. We’re bringing you the best in research on Chiropractic.

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

You have fainted very dramatically into Episode #36 and we’re so glad you did. 

How’s your week been so far? I shared on the last podcast how we have had a rough 2018 but things have leveled off and we up and running. It feels a little like a sprint these days to tell you the truth. Lol. And thank the good Lord for it. 

Speaking of thanking the Good Lord, my 16-year-old son has been raised in the church. Not every single Sunday. I like to sleep sometimes ya know. But, often enough to say he’s been a church-goer as has my 11-year-old daughter. We’ve not pushed anything on him but he has taken it upon himself to an extent to further the church part of his life. 

He’s gone to a church camp in New Mexico the last two summers and this year he returned ready to get baptized. So he did. Last Sunday he went to church and took a bath and we couldn’t be more proud of that little dude. He’s actually not so little anymore but, we worry about our kids don’t we?

We worry about if we’re raising them right. Am I raising him to be a good man? Am I raising him to work hard and be dependable? Will they be ready for the world? Have I somehow enabled him to be weak? Am I raising him to feel entitled instead of working his butt off for things in his life

I think parents have all of these worries. I might argue that if you’re not asking yourself at least some of these questions, you might give them a deeper look. I’m not a parenting expert. That’s just my opinion. 

Anyway, my point is, we got this aspect of his life right so far. We sure love that kiddo and we love the direction we see him headed. Kids can be a game-changer for sure. From conception throughout their entire lives, they consume our mind space without even realizing it. And that’s OK. We wouldn’t have any other way most to the time. 

With school back in session now, what are some of the ways that you keep your practice from slowing down? Back to school is historically a slow time for us and we’re never quite sure how to keep that from happening. Email me at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com and tell me how you do it. I’ll be glad to share on next week’s podcast if you don’t mind. 

This week, I just want to throw some seemingly random papers having to do with research on Chiropractic at you and we’ll start with one called “Effectiveness of classic physical therapy proposals for non-specific low back pain: a literature review.” It was written by F Cuenca-Martinez[1], et.al. and published in Physical Therapy  Research in March of 2018. This is a group of physical therapists writing this paper just so you are in the know. 

Why They Did It

The authors were hoping to evaluate the effectiveness of classical physiotherapy in the management of non-specific chronic low back pain. 

How They Did It

  • They did a literature search in English electronic databases from November- December in 2015 for only randomized controlled trials
  • They only accepted the studies addressing chronic non-specific low back pain treated by manual therapy and different types of exercise methods. 

What They Found

Back School exercises and McKenzie’s method were both ineffective

Spinal manipulation proved effective when performed on the lower back and on the thoracic region but only immediately after it was received and not in the medium or in the long term. 

Massage proved effective for short-term relief

Wrap It Up

The authors’ conclusion was “Based on the data obtained, classical physiotherapy proposals show ineffectiveness in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain. More multidimensional studies are needed in order to achieve a better treatment of this condition, including the biopsychosocial paradigm.”

What do we get from this? First thought is, the papers they cite are, at this point, old and considering the papers we have been covering, are really pretty irrelevant to an extent. I mean, any good information will always be good information but only until better information becomes available. The most recent paper cited for the spinal manipulation portion of this project is over 5 years old. So….what the hell?

Second….it’s a bit discombobulated when you read through the abstract. I’m either bad at following along (which is highly likely) or it’s just worded so oddly. I dove into the full paper to try to make heads or tails of what they have going on here. It sounds like physical therapists are just trying to be cheeky monkeys and throwing poo at spinal manipulation and we’re not having it. Mostly because they’re wrong and because we are better and more cost-effective at treating low back pain than they are. Period over and out. 

The authors, in regards to spinal manipulation, refer to three studies. One by Oliveira, et. al[2]., one by Bronfort et. al[3]. and one by Senna and Machaly[4]. The Bronfort study was done on 300 patients and they found basically no difference between those that had physical therapy vs. chiropractic vs. home exercises. They all ended up the same. But, they didn’t cite the work we covered previously showing that chiropractic combined with exercise is more effective that physical therapy. 

Or the paper from Episode 26 by Korthals-de Bos[5] that concluded: “Manual therapy (spinal mobilization) is more effective and less costly for treating neck pain than physiotherapy or care by a general practitioner.”

There was also no mention of the paper by Blanchette et. al. that we covered in Episode #26 that showed that chiropractic patients experience the shortest duration of compensation, and physical therapists’ patients the longest. Blanchette says in that conclusion, “These differences raise concerns regarding the use of physiotherapists as gatekeepers for the worker’s compensation system.” And all the chiropractors said, “Amen, hallelujah brothers and sisters.”

And the Senna paper they cite actually concluded by saying, “SMT is effective for the treatment of chronic nonspecific LBP. To obtain long-term benefit, this study suggests maintenance SM after the initial intensive manipulative therapy.”

I’m done with that paper. 

Let’s move on from these PTs and their poo-throwing. 

Here’s one more specifically geared toward research on Chiropractic called “Chiropractic care and risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a population-based self-controlled case series study” by Cesar Hincapie, et. al[6].  

Why They Did It

The objective was to investigate the association between chiropractic care and acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgical intervention and contrast this with the association between primary care physician (PCP) care and acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgery

What They Found

Both chiropractic and primary medical care were associated with an increased risk for acute LDH requiring ED visit and early surgery. Our analysis suggests that patients with prodromal back pain from a developing disc herniation likely seek healthcare from both chiropractors and PCPs before full clinical expression of acute LDH. We found no evidence of excess risk for acute LDH with early surgery associated with chiropractic compared with primary medical care.

This Hincapie fella also had a prior paper published not long ago[7] where he discussed and explored the perception among different medical disciplines and among chiropractors as to whether spinal manipulation causes a lumbar disc herniation. It was an interesting paper. We covered it in episode #27 if you’d like to give it a listen. 

https://www.chiropracticforward.com/cf-027-wanted-safe-nonpharmacological-mean-of-treating-spinal-pain/

Then there’s this research on Chiropractic that came out recently titled “Spine Degenerative Conditions and Their Treatments: National Trends in the United States of America” and published in Global Spine Journal February 2018. It was authored by Buser et. al[8]. 

Why They Did It

The aim of this study was to report the current trends when talking about spine degenerative disorders and their various  treatments.

How They Did It

Patients diagnosed with lumbar or cervical spine conditions within the orthopedic Medicare and Humana databases were included

What They Found

  • Within the Medicare database there were 6 206 578 patients diagnosed with lumbar and 3 156 215 patients diagnosed with cervical degenerative conditions between 2006 and 2012
  • There was an increase of 18.5% in the incidence of fusion among lumbar patients
  • For the Humana data sets there were 1 160 495 patients diagnosed with lumbar and 660 721 patients diagnosed with cervical degenerative disorders from 2008 to 2014
  • There was a 33% (lumbar) and 42% (cervical) increases in the number of diagnosed patients. However, in both lumbar and cervical groups there was a decrease in the number of surgical and nonoperative treatments.

Wrap It Up

The authors wrap it up by saying, “There was an overall increase in both lumbar and cervical conditions, followed by an increase in lumbar fusion procedures within the Medicare database. There is still a burning need to optimize the spine care for the elderly and people in their prime work age to lessen the current national economic burden.”

What do we get from that? I’d say that it’s clear from research on Chiropractic we’ve covered here that neck and back pain is stepping forward for sure. It is being recognized for the problem it really is while treatments available in the medical kingdom continue to show scattered results. Chiropractors are the most uniquely positioned to knock this stuff out of the park. 

Fusion surgeries have gone crazy sky high in the last ten years while the outcomes have remained unchanged. 

Epidural steroid injections have been done at a blistering pace over the last decade with no better outcomes. 

Physical therapists are even starting to question their own effectiveness. Take this article in the journal called Physical Therapy written by Colleen Whiteford et. al[9]. Here is the opening paragraph. Get a load of this:

“We are writing to relay our consternation about the guideline article by Bier et al in the March issue of PTJ. We fully support the increasing emphasis on critical evaluation fo the assessment and intervention models used in physical therapist practice. The long-overdue acknowledgment of research that does not support much of what constitutes the bulk of physical therapist practice is a refreshing and honest introspection that can potentially initiate much-needed change within our profession.”

“Without such change, our profession is destined to continue on our current path of practice that is increasingly shown to be yielding outcomes that are less than desirable. Such exploration inevitably leaves us with gaping holes in practice that can be unsettling. The natural and responsible tendency is to search for alternative measures and interventions to fill this gap.”

I’m going to tell you one of those alternatives they’ll be looking to adopt and are looking to adopt is spinal manipulation. You better listen to me folks. If you’ve listened to our podcast much here then you know they’ve already adopted adjustments and renamed it to translatoric spinal manipulation. 

We can keep monkeying with these chiropractors out on the edge of the ether talking about curing everyone on the planet of everything known to man or we can keep moving in the direction of science and in the direction of evidence. My preference is obvious. 

If you haven’t yet, can you leave us a great review on whatever platform it is that you’re listening to us on? iTunes, Stitcher, or whatever it may be. We sure would appreciate it. 

Integrating Chiropractors

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments. Research on chiropractic shows this clearly.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability. It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks. Again, research on chiropractic shows this clearly.

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. We’ll keep bringing you Research on chiropractic in the hopes of reaching that goal!

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

??Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

??Social Media Links

??iTunes

??Player FM Link

??Stitcher:

??TuneIn

Bibliography

1. Cuenca-Martínez F, Effectiveness of classic physical therapy proposals for chronic non-specific low back pain: a literature review. Phys Ther Res, 2018. 21(1): p. 16-22.

2. Oliveira RF, Immediate effects of region-specific and non-region-specific spinal manipulative therapy in patients with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. Phys Ther Res, 2013. 93(6): p. 748-56.

3. Bronfort G, Supervised exercise, spinal manipulation, and home exercise for chronic low back pain: a randomized clinical trial. Spine, 2011. 11(7): p. 585-98.

4. Senna MK, Does maintained spinal manipulation therapy for chronic nonspecific low back pain result in better long-term outcome? Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2011. Aug 15; 36(18): p. 1427-37.

5. Korthals-de Bos IB, Cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and general practitioner care for neck pain: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial. British Medical Journal, 2003. 326(7395): p. 911.

6. Hincapie C, Chiropractic care and risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a population-based self-controlled case series study. European Spine Journal, 2018. 27(7): p. 1526-1537.

7. Hincapie C, Chiropractic spinal manipulation and the risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a belief elicitation study. European Spine Journal, 2017.

8. Buser Z, Spine Degenerative Conditions and Their Treatments: National Trends in the United States of America. Global Spine J, 2018. 8(1): p. 57-67.

9. Whiteford C, On “Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain,” Bier JD, Scholten-Peeters WGM, Staal JB, et al. Phys Ther. 2018;98:162–171. Physical Therapy, 2018.

CF 035: Chiropractic & Disc Herniations

Chiropractic and Disc HerniationsIntegrating Chiropractors

Today we’re going to kick around information on disc herniations, disc bulging, and radiculopathy as a result. Is there anything we can do about it? Well, I’m a chiropractic advocate and research backs us on it so I’ll say, “Hell yes.” Come along with us, won’t you?

 

First, I feel some sweet sweet bumper music moving in….

 

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.

 

Now that I have you here, I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.comand sign up for our newsletter. It makes it easier to let you know when the newest episode goes live and it makes me feel good. Don’t you like to make people feel good? Of course, you do so….do it do it.

 

Also, our group on Facebook. It’s called the Chiropractic Forward Group and I think that’s as appropriate of a name as I could come up with. Lol. Just in case you didn’t know, there’s the page on Facebook. That’s for getting the word out and telling people about the podcast. Then there’s the private group. That’s for interacting with each other, learning from each other, posting new papers when they come out, and maybe organizing into a powerful group someday, somewhere down the line. That sort of deal must grow organically. It can’t be forced so we won’t try to do that.

 

We’ll just let you all know about its existence and hope to start seeing you over there. Let’s start a conversation outside of the podcast!

 

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

 

You have back-flipped head-on into Episode #35

 

Before we talk about all of the disc herniations stuff, I want to tell you all about my weekend. I spent Saturday and part of Sunday morning with my butt firmly planted in a chair in a hotel conference room listening to Dr. Brandon Steele talk about shoulder issues. He was the teacher as his company ChiroUp was a sponsor of the event but he was there teaching as part of the DACO program which is run by the University of Bridgeport.

 

What the heck is DACO right? Well, what used to be called DABCO is now called a DACO which stands for Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedists. I have mentioned before where I sat through the first 10 DACO hours back in June. That was over the low back. These ten were over the shoulder. Topics covered included Scapular Dyskinesis. I knew nothing of this mess and, I already identified and started working with one of these patients the day after I got home. We also covered shoulder impingement, rotator cuff issues, thoracic outlet syndrome, and adhesive capsulitis to name a few.

 

Good stuff all around and, even if I don’t go all the way through the DACO program, I get better and better every time I take a class. And not just better. I get exponentially better.

 

In talking with Dr. Steele this weekend, he agreed to come on to the podcast as a guest. We’ll get that all lined up. I have a ton of questions for him. Some questions about the DACO program, some about ChiroUp (it’s really a game-changer and you better use my name if you sign on!!!), and I want to ask him about practice standardization and some things along those lines. It should be a fun conversation so make sure you keep your eyes out for it in the near future.

 

I encourage you…..a lot of what we talk about here is integrating with the medical community and really stepping up. Part of that is taking the steps to get educated at higher and higher levels. The DACO is in line with that. I have zero association with the people running it other than the fact that I love the product they have created and use it regularly. There is nothing in it as far as reimbursement goes. I just believe in what they’re doing. I encourage you all to look into this DACO program. If you don’t know where to start, just email me at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com and I’ll get you pointed in the right direction.

 

Now, on to disc herniations

 

Have you ever been told we can’t do anything for discs? Have you been told to not adjust if they have a low back disc issue? Do you know how to recognize a disc issue? What’s the best way to treat it? So many questions!!

Here’s the deal for me today. I’m no guru. I’m going to throw research on you but in the end, a lot of it is just experience. So, don’t take my word as the gold standard. I didn’t expect you to anyway but, I wanted to be sure. Lol.

 

Let’s look first at recognizing disc herniations. There are some simple questions that can get you moving in the right direction on this:

  • Do you have static position irritation meaning, do you have to move around in your chair often to get comfortable?
  • Do you have pain going from seated to standing?
  • Is there a positive Milgram’s
  • How about a positive Modified Slump test?
  • Valsalva’s is part of that but some do it separately.
  • Same with SLR. I was taught that pain on SLR in the first 30 degrees, when the nerve is first tensioned, was indicative of a disc issue but the DACO folks say it’s between 30 and 70 degrees.
  • Worst position is seated
  • Best is lying down
  • Deep buttock pain
  • Pain in the first 1/3 of trunk flexion or trunk extension that cannot be alleviated by bracing or tightening a belt around the waist.
  • Radiating pain into the leg
  • As a general rule of thumb, the further pain radiates beyond the knee, the more likely it is caused by a disc.
  • Sometime you’ll encounter diminished reflexes or differences in sensory or motor information from side to side.

 

When should we get an MRI for disc herniations and other issues? Red flags like the history of cancer, fever, chills, recent unexplained weight loss, immunosuppression, and corticosteroid use give you a reason. Symptoms lasting longer than 6 weeks or symptoms showing progressive neurological deficit also give you a reason to get that MRI.

 

What can we do about it?

Again, that’s going to depend on who you ask. Are we going by The Lancet? Why not go by some chiropractic gurus? We can go by the medical fields recommendation or by physical therapists techniques? I say yes, yes, and yes.

 

I had a neurosurgeon buddy of mine tell me, whatever the hell works without doing surgery…..do that. I agree. That’s why we are friends coincidentally.

 

So, knowing all of that, I’m going to tell you what has been effective for me in my practice. The first thing is something that the insurance companies call experimental and investigational. I think they’re full of it. They don’t seem to be in any hurry to pick up new services to have to pay for, do they? But you know what? I’d rather them NOT cover it so we can actually get paid what it is worth.

 

What I’m talking about here is decompression for disc herniations. This was a game-changer for me in my practice. I have three short stories for you here. They all have to do with guys I tried to send to the surgeon. I’m not going into why we ordered the MRIs or the exam findings. It would take too long for this format so we’re going to jump to the chase in each of their cases.

 

  1. The first is a dude was in town visiting for work and was only going to be here for a few months before returning home. The MRI showed us that his disc herniations was 14 mm caudal migration. I sent him straight to the surgeon. The surgeon set him up for surgery in 6 weeks. The guy was on board with having surgery but couldn’t wait 6 weeks for some kind of relief. Any kind of relief. He begged me to do decompression. I figured that we could go light. In the end, it’s traction and he had no contraindications to decompression so we did it. This guy was back to working and dancing around in the office in about a week and a half y’all. If you want to say it’s placebo, that’s OK, we’re just going to disagree. If you want to say people just like to be touched and I could have pulled on his big toe and it may have had the same effect, I’m going to tell you to jump in a lake.
  2. The second was a guy that was a truck driver. He was in his 70’s and had had heart surgeries and was on blood thinners. He was a physical wreck honestly. When he came in, he was in a wheelchair and unable to work or function. I got an MRI and his herniation was posterior with 18 mm of caudal migration. That used to be a ticket to the surgeon so off he went. Well, his cardiologist would not take him off of the blood thinners so surgery was out of the question. He came back to me just like the other case we discussed. He had no other options and would I please do decompression on him to try to get him some relief. It had been going for quite some time. OK, sure. I’m a nice guy but I told him, I doubt it’s going to help something like you have going on. Yeah, yeah, yeah, hook me up, please. So we did. Guess what? He came in just a time or two later on a walker instead of a wheelchair. Then, a week or so later, he came in without a walker. Then a month or two down the road, he got a new job and was out there telling everyone that would listen about what we were able to do for him. You can take a long walk off a short pier if you’re going to suggest that was anything other than significant effects due to direct intervention.
  3. Last and worst of all disc herniations I’ve ever seen. He is actually a good friend of mine. He came in with numbness and weakness all the way into his foot. Limping, the whole deal. He worked in a warehouse and would have to be forklifted to the second floor where his office is because he couldn’t get there any other way. He thinks it was due to a motorcycle wreck several years ago. Whatever the cause, it was pretty crazy. His MRI showed disc herniations of 23mm of caudal migration. Almost all the way down to the next disc below. I had never seen that before and haven’t seen it since. I, of course, told him he needed to go to the surgeon muy pronto. He agreed but his wife, bless her heart, did not. And thank goodness. She was adamant about him not going to the surgeon. She strongly urged him to not go until he at least gave decompression a try. I told him about the first two cases we just talked about but that he was really in a different ballpark than those guys and I really didn’t know how I could help at all. They understood but decided to give it a go anyway. And thank God they did. Sometimes our patients teach us instead of us teaching them, don’t they? It took a couple of months but he started to turn around and never had that surgery. I just checked with him the other day, 2 years later, and he’s doing great. He said he has a little numbness in the outside of his foot but nothing bad and nothing he can’t handle. All’s well and guess who the hero is? Well….his wife. She’s the hero. Lol. I’m still the buddy and buddies can’t be heroes.

 

These are the worst of the worst disc herniations but what about all of the others that were more minor disc herniations? Think of all of the successes we have had with disc herniations over the years. When I say it’s a game-changer, I damn well mean it and, once again, I care not what insurance companies have to say about it.

 

Let’s look at some papers on it.

 

This one is called “Simple pelvic traction gives inconsistent relief to herniated lumbar disc sufferers” by Edward Eyerman, MD. It was published in the Journal of Neuroimaging in June of 1998[1].

 

Why They Did It

The aim was to do before and after MRIs to correlate improvement in the clinic with MRI evidence in terms of disc herniations repair in the annulus, nucleus, facet joint, or in the foramen as a result of decompression treatment.

 

Eyerman was testing the effectiveness of decompression in a sample of 12 men and 8 women aged 26-74. No, not a big sample.

His MRI finding was as follows:

Disc Herniations: 10 of 14 improved significantly, some globally, some at least locally at the site of the nerve root compression.

Measured improvement in local or general disc herniation size varied in the range of 0% in 2 patients, 20% in 4 patients, 30% to 50% in 4 patients and a remarkable 90 % in 2 patients that did all 40 sessions.

As far as clinical outcomes of the subjects go, he noted that all but 3 patients had very significant pain relief, complete relief of weakness when present, and of immobility and of all numbness except for in 1 patient with herniation and 2 with foraminal stenosis without herniation.

Summed up, he said “Serial MRI imaging of 20 patients treated with the decompression table shows in our study up to 90% reduction of subligamentous nucleus herniation in 10 of 14. Some rehydration occurs detected by T2 and proton density signal increase. Torn annulus repair is seen in all. Transligamentous ruptures show lesser repair. Facet arthrosis can be shown to improve chiefly by pain relief.

Then we have this one by Thomas Gionis, MD published in the Orthopedic Technology Review in December of 2003[2].

They concluded, “Results showed that 86% of the 219 patients who completed the therapy reported immediate resolution of symptoms, while 84% remained pain-free 90 days post-treatment. Physical examination findings showed improvement in 92% of the 219 patients, and remained intact in 89% of these patients 90 days after treatment.”

When is surgery necessary? Well, that’s going to depend on who you ask but a good general rule I follow is that cauda equina syndrome is a quick trip to a surgeon. I personally don’t like foot drop and am likely to send to a surgical consult. I think any progressive worsening of neuro symptoms is cause to pause and reconsider whatever you’re doing. If what you’re doing ain’t fixing it, change directions.

 

But there is this paper I found interesting. It’s from 2010 and called “Spontaneous Regression for a Large Lumbar Disc Extrusion[3]” by Ryu Sung-Joo, MD and was published online for the Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society. I have no idea what the quality of this journal is or what the impact is but it’s interesting and I’ve seen studies before about spontaneous resolution of disc herniations.

 

The authors say, “Although the spontaneous disappearance or decrease in the size of a herniated disc is well known, that of a large extruded disc has rarely been reported. This paper reports a case of a spontaneous regression of a large lumbar disc extrusion. The disc regressed spontaneously with clinical improvement and was documented on a follow-up MRI study 6 months later.”

 

The case report was on a 53-year-old female after 6 months of low back pain and left lateral leg pain with numbness. Y’all go to the show notes and get the reference to this paper. The MRI images are great.

 

They mention, “After conservative treatment, her clinical symptoms subsided gradually but the numbness of her left lateral leg still remained. A second MRI study performed approximately 6 months after the prior examination reveals almost complete disappearance of the extruded fragment that had been located posterolateral to the L5 vertebral body and no evidence of compression or displacement of the dural sac or nerve root.” Wowza.

 

They go on to explain, “Our patient is an example of the resolution of a large protruded disc without surgery. This phenomenon may be due in part to the fact that larger fragments have a higher water content8) and may regress through dehydration/shrinkage, retraction, and inflammation-mediated resorption.” Meaning….her body ate it and it went bye bye.

 

They finished up the paper by saying, “Even in patients with large lumbar disc extrusion, non-surgical conservative care can be considered as an option for the treatment when radiculopathy is acceptable and neurological deficit is absent.“

That’s pretty cool. I don’t think surgeons are going to want to hear it but it’s cool. If all they can do is surgery on cauda equina or foot drop, they’re going to have a hard time financially.

 

Alright, moving beyond decompression or spontaneous resorption, what else can we do?

 

Here’s one I got from Dr. Tim Bertlesman. It was authored by G McMorland and called “Manipulation or microdiskectomy for sciatica? A prospective randomized clinical study[4].” This one was published in the Journal of Manipulative Physiology and Therapeutics in 2010 and goes like this. The authors concluded, “Sixty percent of patients with sciatica who had failed other medical management benefited from spinal manipulation to the same degree as if they underwent surgical intervention. Of the 40% left unsatisfied, subsequent surgical intervention confers excellent outcome. Patients with symptomatic LDH failing medical management should consider spinal manipulation followed by surgery if warranted.“

 

Go check it out in the show notes if you want the nuts and bolts and bells and whistles, please.

 

Then there are your directional preferences exercises. If you have not familiarized yourself with directional preferences, please do so yesterday. They are based upon the idea of centralization and peripheralization. McKenzie’s program uses it, the CRISP protocol uses it, Kennedy’s decompression system uses it, and the DACO program teaches it. Do you see a pattern of some sort emerging here?

 

Other things that are helpful are exercise recommendations like McKenzie or Williams exercises depending on the directional preference, core building.

 

These patients also need strong at-home suggestions like:

  • Get an inversion table for the house.
  • Get back to work as soon as possible
  • Don’t lay up in bed hoping it goes away
  • Sleep correctly
  • Work advice like get up and walk every 45 minutes or so
  • Don’t use catastrophic language and make sure they know it’s not a disease and most disc cases resolve

 

I don’t have all of the answers but, I’m guessing none of you do either. In the end, it’s experience, isn’t it? For example, without experience, I wouldn’t have known that it COULD be possible to help three guys with caudal migration of a disc from 14mm all the way up to 23mm. Nothing but experience can show someone that.

 

While we don’t know it all, we DO find means that are effective and help us get the job done and make a difference in our patients’ lives. That’s for sure.

This week, I want you to go forward with the knowledge that, in case you didn’t already know it, you’re powerful. You can take disc herniations that used to be sent straight to surgery and you can treat that complaint with safe, conservative, non-invasive, and non-pharmacologic means. That’s a hell of a deal right there, folks.

 

We’re not done talking about disc herniations, decompression, and all of that fun stuff. There’s too much left in the tank to be done but, in the interest of time, we’ll get to it on another episode.

 

Integrating Chiropractors

 

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

 

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability. It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

 

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.comand let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

 

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool.

 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

 

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  1. Eyerman E, e.a., MRI Evidence of Nonsurgical, Mechanical Reduction, Rehydration and Repair of the herniated Lumbar Disc.J Neuro Imaging, 1998. 8(2).
  2. Gionis T, Surgical Alternatives: Spinal Decompression.Orthopedic Technology Review, 2003. 6(5).
  3. Ryu Sung-Joo, Spontaneous Regression of a Large Lumbar Disc Extrusion.J Korean Neurosurg Soc., 2010. 48(3): p. 285-287.
  4. McMorland G, Manipulation or microdiskectomy for sciatica? A prospective randomized clinical study. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2010. 33(8): p. 576-584.

 

CF 027: WANTED – Safe, Nonpharmacological Means Of Treating Spinal Pain

CF 025: Vets With Low Back Pain. Usual Care + Chiropractic vs. Usual Care Alone

CF 026: Chiropractic Better Than Physical Therapy and Usual Medical Care For Musculoskeletal Issues

https://www.chiropracticforward.com/cf-019-non-opioid-more-effective-while-chiropractic-maintenance-may-be-the-most-effective/ Adolphus Washington Womens Jersey

CF 034: Chiropractic Information To Help You Form Your Practice

Chiropractic Information To Help You Form Your Practice

Integrating Chiropractors

Today we’re going to talk about a couple of interesting articles that have come out recently touching on some chiropractic information and it’s all good in the neighborhood for chiropractors. 

But first, here’s that bumper music

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  That’s this one…you’re listening to it right now so you don’t have to do anything else at this point. Just listen and chill out. 

Since you’re here, I might as well ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. It makes it easier to let you know when the newest episode goes live, when someone new signs up it makes my heart leap a little and in the end, wouldn’t you just like to know when new episodes come out and, what if we end up compiling a team and coming up with some great ideas? Heck yeah, you want to know about that stuff so make sure you’re on the newsletter. It’s just an email guys. Not diamonds or gold. Lol. 

I want to share with you all the fact that our downloads on this podcast have almost DOUBLED from last month. We’ve picked up that much steam in just one month. Thank you to you all for tuning in. If you can continue to share us with your network and give us some pretty sweet reviews on iTunes, I’ll be forever grateful. 

If all you do is listen, that’s awesome and I’m glad you’re a part of this thing. But, if you can take the extra few seconds to share the episode with buddies on Facebook or wherever, THAT’S the real difference.  

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

You have bee-bopped right into Episode #34

Before we get into it too far, I’m going to be honest with you all. 2018 has been a challenging year for me both business wise as well as personally. For several reasons really. 

When your attention is taken away from where it needs to be, things tend to fall apart little by little and then finally, you go into a mode where you are all hands on deck and really focused on righting the ship. 

Well, that happened to me at the end of 2017 and through a lot of 2018 as well. I’m only sharing this with you because I want listeners to understand that we’re in this dude together. Issues I deal with and are ultimately able to solve…..if I share those experiences with our listeners, I believe it serves to help you in your practice. 

Here’s the deal, an evidence-based chiropractor, whether I like it or not, is somewhat dependent on a steady stream of new patients. That is due to the fact that we don’t try to see our patients a hundred times, right? We don’t develop the reputation of seeing how many times we can run our patients through the door. Do we? Hopefully, this is chiropractic information you can use.

Oh looky here….your insurance allows you to have 27 visits in a year and….what dya know….your specific condition requires exactly 27 visits to resolve. Ugh. That stuff makes me crazy and, unfortunately, chiropractors are notorious for it. I am hoping some updated, reasonable chiropractic information can sway them to the light. 

Just so chiros don’t think I’m bashing too hard here, medical doctors do useless surgeries just because they can do it and get paid for it with little to zero concern about the person it was done to. It’s rampant in all fields. I just notice the chiropractic side of it more than the others because I’m in it. No chiropractor holds on to 100% of their patients. It just doesn’t happen. 

But, if those NUMBERS DOCTORS – the ones hitting certain stats and the ones that are doctor-centered rather than patient-centered….those guys and gals…..I wonder if they have any idea how many patients they drive away by having that kind of model. And I don’t mean drive away from just their practice. I’m also talking about the number of people they drive away from ANY chiropractor because they assume we’re all the same. It all gives me a rash when I think about it. The public doesn’t have the kind of chiropractic information the rest of us have. 

Anyway, new patients: we depend on a steady stream of them. Now, last year, I would average 55-65 new patients a month but, while we started having issues with billing/collections department, I really got down, I got stressed, and honestly, for a bit, doubted the future of my practice remaining in its current state. That leads to self-doubt too. Where you had a ton of confidence, there remains only a shred after having your foundation shaken, right?

As much as you’d like to avoid it, business gets brought home. Especially when it’s an all-consuming feeling of self-doubt and potential impending doom. Lol. Maybe I’m being a little dramatic looking back on it but, when you’re in it, it’s intense. 

As a result of my focus being altered, my new patient count went to 38 here, 42 there. We’re talking 20+ less new patients per month there for a little while. Without changing anything to my knowledge. 

I spoke with a colleague here in town and his numbers have been down as well so maybe it’s not just me. Who knows?

Here’s what I DO know though. As soon as things lined out in the billing/collections department, guess what, the new patient stream started to line out.

How’s that exactly? I don’t know. I’m guessing an increase in confidence in regards to finances leads to an increase in self-confidence and, when all of my focus isn’t on billing/collections, I have the freedom to work on and consider other aspects of the business. And let’s face it, I’m just a much more pleasant person to be around when I’m not worried about the financial health of my company. I’m going to guess you all are the same way. 

Seriously, once we made a change in the billing/collections department (as badly as I did not want to do it), my billing and collections turned around immediately. I mean immediately. Front desk staff became more confident. I became more confident. Patients started paying what they were supposed to pay. Outdated balances got current. THAT’s some good chiropractic information!

Long story short, what started out as a slow 2018 has become a little bit crazy for me and, if it continues, I’m going to have to hire an associate so I can come up for air. Just getting the podcast written up and produced has started to become a real chore in the last several weeks but I’m committed folks. I’m here for the long haul. 

I hope you are too. 

Let’s start our research talk with one from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies dated 17th of July, 2018 called “Chiropractic in global health and wellbeing: a white paper describing the public health agenda of the World Federation of Chiropractic[1]. This was authored by Michele Maiers, et. al. 

The article begins by saying, “The World Federation of Chiropractic supports the involvement of chiropractors in public health initiatives, particularly as it relates to musculoskeletal health.” I noticed there is no neuro before the musculoskeletal description. Curious. 

The authors then say there are three topics that require out focus as chiropractors and they are

  1. Healthy aging
  2. Opioid misuse
  3. Women, children, and adolescents’ health

I guess the men in the crowd are either built heartier or we’re just not quite as important. Lol. 

The WFC want to help us in participating in these areas and promote chiropractic as partners in the broader healthcare system. That’s certainly something I can get on board with. 

Now, this article is pretty darn long so we’re just going to hit some of the more interesting spots. I will have it linked in the show notes so you can go hop online and read the whole thing word for word should you feel the desire. 

In the background section of the article, they say, “In an era where both medical costs and years lived with chronic disease are increasing, calls have been made for closer collaboration between public health officials and healthcare providers. The potential contribution of many providers, including chiropractors and other health care professionals, is often overlooked.”

But then they go on to say our profession needs to identify priority areas of focus and have plans for our engagement in public health based on these areas of focus. 

I am wondering why they feel that men engaged in manual labor activities having chronic low back pain are not worthy of being a focus group here? We’ve talked so much about how low back pain is such a global epidemic and how so much work is missed as a result blah blah blah. 

Maybe I’m just old school. I don’t have any stats to prove my thoughts here but, I would assume the majority of manual labor is on the backs of men. If I’m not right about that, please email me and show me the stats at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com. If I’m wrong, I need to be educated. 

Still, what gives on this? I want to be positive so let’s get back to the paper. 

In the area of Healthy Aging, they state the world’s population is getting older and older with the number of folks over the age of 60 years old expected to double in the first half of this century. 

That’s assuming they get control of opioids right? We covered an article some time back that said the US expected lifespan has actually decreased in the last two years rather than increased because of opioids so there is that to keep in mind. 

They mention that “Musculoskeletal conditions are a leading contributor to non-communicable burden of disease, predominantly low-back pain and osteoarthritis.” 

And…”Physical activity is key in the prevention, treatment, and management of most chronic conditions affecting older adults, including musculoskeletal complaints. Chiropractors should consider prescribing exercise, with or without manual therapy, for spine care in older adults. Such approaches are supported by an evidence-based framework, which includes clinical practice guidelines.” Great chiropractic information.

Isn’t it nice to see the WFC using evidence-based terminology and approaching things from an evidence-based platform? Everything mentioned in this article has resources that are cited. It feels good and it gives me a warm fuzzy feeling all over. 

They also talk about how falling is a major concern among the older crowd and how exercises and physical activity helping to maintain strength and balance can help prevent them. 

They mention potential barriers to older folks getting chiropractic care. If you are a regular listener of our podcast, you know about the White House report that actually said CMS creates barriers to patients seeking care under a chiropractor[2]. I just linked that in the show notes if you want to look at it. It’s on page 57 so you can avoid reading the whole thing just to get that snippet.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/whitehouse.gov/files/images/Final_Report_Draft_11-3-2017.pdf

How does that get resolved exactly? I think that’s what happens when we have government-run healthcare in my opinion. They have to cut costs and the services they feel are of the least value will go away in terms of coverage. 

I think that’s what is going on with Medicare. Research shows it’s effective but we can’t get anything other than an adjustment covered. What other reason would there be? Pass on any of your chiropractic information you can share with us on this.

Onto focus area #2: Opioid misuse. 

Boy we’ve covered this one. Like….a lot. Let’s see if they have anything new here for us to chew on. 

Here’s a new stat I haven’t seen before, “Opioids account for 70% of the negative health impact associated with drug use disorders globally, and are considered the most harmful drug type .” They also say, “Approximately 69,000 people worldwide die from opioid overdose each year, with a large toll of overdose deaths in the United States and Canada.”

Then they say something I completely agree with, “The opioid misuse crisis creates an impetus for chiropractors and chiropractic organizations to collaborate with other healthcare providers, decision makers, and stakeholders. Patient-centered, inter-professional collaboration should be expanded for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain, with chiropractors playing a larger role on multidisciplinary pain management teams.”

Notice they say “Patient-centered.” Not “Doctor-centered.” Not offices and doctors that do things to hit numbers. Not doctors that see a patient 80 visits. Not those guys. Patient-centered, evidence-based chiropractors are in the right spot right now folks. 

OK, priority #3: Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescents’ Health. 

When covering some of the relevant issues for this group, they cite pregnancy-related back pain and pelvic pain and post-partum spinal disorders which may impede recovery. 

The second issue cited is hormonal changes, dietary factors, and physical inactivity are all factors for osteoporosis. 

The third is violence against women and girls causing injury. I’m just not sure how in the year 2018 we still have violence against women and girls or children in general. Human beings can be cretins, can’t we? Lack of parenting? Inherent evil in the offenders? Who knows? It’s hard to postulate on something you understand nothing about. 

Here’s something in the article I can agree with 100% they say that women are the major decision maker for their families. If you are marketing men…..in most markets, you are wasting your money. 

I can’t tell you how many men come in here and when we ask how they found us or what brings them here today, they say, “My wife. This is where my wife told me to be. I didn’t want to come. I don’t like doctors but my wife is tired of my griping about my back.”

Market the ladies and you market effectively. End of story. 

To summarize the article, the WFC says they are developing tools with the goal of empowering chiropractors and WFC member organizations to engage in public health activities in the three identified priority areas. I’m looking forward to seeing what they’re going to come up with. Exciting stuff here. Great chiropractic information.

The next article I want to cover quickly is one written by Dr. Christine Goertz called “What Does Research Reveal About Chiropractic Costs?” and it was published on the ACA Blog on July 10, 2018[3]. 

Dr. Goertz by saying something ALL evidence-based chiros can yell, “Amen,” at and that is where she says, “Without a doubt, the most common issues raised by those outside the profession relate to the quality and consistency of chiropractic care delivery. The second most commonly asked question invariably pertains to the costs associated with chiropractic care.”

So….AMEN! 

Another amen quote would be this one: “(Evidence) consistently shows that patients with low back and neck pain who are treated by chiropractors have either similar or lower costs than those seeking care from other providers. In particular, it appears that patients who visit a chiropractor are less likely to undergo hospitalization, resulting in lower global healthcare costs than those who receive medical care only.”

Hallelujah. If you love this chiropractic information you need to share this chiropractic information.

When addressing the cost of chiropractic care, Dr. Goertz mentions a paper we have covered here by Hurwitz[4] that concluded that found that health care expenditures for patients with low back pain, neck pain, and headaches were all lower in those who received chiropractic care alone when compared to any other combination of healthcare providers. 

Well, that’s some sexy chiropractic information, isn’t it? Of course it is. You realize you can use articles like this and the information you get from podcasts like this to help you educate your population and your area’s Medical professionals right? Are you listening or are you listening and utilizing? That’s a good question to think about. I have cited the Hurwitz paper in the show notes for your own independent review. 

She then covers a paper by Martin et. al. that we will be covering soon. Over 12,000 patients with 4,300 or so using alternative healthcare. 75% of the alternative users (3,225) were treated with chiropractic. This is big for chiropractic since those treating with alternative means had $424 less in spinal care and $796 less in total healthcare costs. Average healthcare spending for alternative care users was on average $526 lower. 

Huge, absolutely huge folks. If that doesn’t put a grin on your face, you’re dead. You need a defibrillator muy pronto, amigo. Share this chiropractic information won’t you?

This week, I want you to go forward with this: Don’t you understand that if we chiropractors were wrong, we’d have been wiped out by now? We are right. We have been right and we will continue to be right. What we do is so powerful that our profession has persisted and, in fact, prospered in spite of the non-evidence-based people out there on the fringe giving the rest of bad names. The hucksters and profiteers have not even been able to destroy it. They’ve held us back, no doubt. But they haven’t been able to extinguish us and that’s pretty powerful. We are right. Keep on keeping on with confidence. 

Integrating Chiropractors

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability. It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

??Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

??Social Media Links

??iTunes

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??TuneIn

Bibliography

1. Maiers M, Chiropractic in Global Health and wellbeing: a white paper describing the public health agenda of the World Federation of Chiropractic. Chiropr Man Therap, 2018. 26(26).

2. The President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and The Opioid Crisis. 2017.

3. Goertz C, What Does Research Reveal About Chiropractic Costs?, in ACA Blog. 2018: ACA Blog.

4. Hurwitz EL, e.a., Variations in Patterns of Utilization and Charges for the Care of Neck Pain in North Carolina, 2000 to 2009: A Statewide Claims’ Data Analysis. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2016. May 39(4): p. 240-51.

Relevant Links

CF 021: Crazy Update On Run-Away Healthcare Spending in America

 

CF 005: Valuable & Reliable Expert Advice On Clinical Guides For Your Practice

 

CF 033: Did You Need Proof That Chiropractors Help Headaches?

Did You Need Proof That Chiropractors Help HeadachesIntegrating Chiropractors

Today we’re going to talk about how chiropractors help headaches, we’ll discuss a couple of pretty cool papers that came out fairly recently, one of them only a couple of weeks ago from this recording, that had to do with spinal manipulation and the effectiveness in treating headaches and migraines. Psssst…..here’s a hint…..it’s good for chiropractors. Except for the very ending.

 

But first, here’s that bumper music

 

OK, we are back. You have shimmied into Episode #33. Chiropractors help headaches is basically our topic.

 

Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  I have to say that in the last month specifically, this podcast really started to take off in terms of downloads and listens.

 

You know, when you first start something, there’s an excellent chance that nobody really gives a hoot. Lol. Isn’t that always the fear when starting something new? Does anyone care? Am I going to be able to offer any value? I have diagnosed myself with an anxiety issue. I over think and over think things. In the end, it’s simply because, no matter what it is I’m doing, I just want to do a good job.

 

I tell my son that, even if I don’t necessarily like somebody on a personal level if they are a hard worker, I will respect them. Everyone can respect a hard worker. Well, that’s what I try to be. I try to work hard and I try to bring things of value to me to you through writings, videos, social media, and podcast.

 

I’ll be honest with you. I have zero clues where all of this will eventually lead me. Lol. No clue at all. There’s no grand plan behind it.

 

All I know is I see it’s value and more and more of you are finding it’s value every week and it’s exciting. Maybe I’ll eventually put a course together for marketing your practice from an evidence-based perspective. Maybe I’ll have in-office patient education products. I’d love to be a speaker and travel the world bringing this information to evidence-hungry crowds. I have no idea where it can go but for now: I’m having fun.

 

Maybe it’s the old traveling musician in me. Maybe I just have to have people tuned in or I’m just lost. Lol. I have no idea but I know it’s fun and I’m glad you’ve come along with us so far. I’ll keep working hard if you’ll keep listening and we’ll just see where things go down the road together. I’m always keeping my eyes out for colleagues that see what I see. If that’s you, send me and email and let’s connect. Also, we’d like to ask you to join not only our Chiropractic Forward Facebook page but we also have a Chiropractic Forward Facebook GROUP where we have started sharing the papers we use, accepting comments, and will probably be including some of them in future episodes. We want our podcast to be a group effort if you’d like to participate. Come join us. The link is in the show notes.

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

 

On a completely different note, I had mentioned back in mid-June or so that I was at the ChiroTexpo event in Dallas that was put on by the Texas Chiropractic Association and I met Dr. Tim Bertelsman down there. He was there for two reasons. One reason was as a vendor for his and Dr. Brandon Steele’s ChiroUp product and the other reason was to teach the Low Back portion of the Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedists (DACO) program put on through the University of Bridgeport.

 

As this episode is recorded, I am about a week and a half from going through my second ten-hour course. This one will be taught by Dr. Brandon Steele down in Dallas again and I’m looking forward to it.

 

This is a really valuable program these guys are teaching and I encourage you all to check it out but, what I really wanted to tell you about is this ChiroUp thing they have going on. It’s crazy. Crazy in a good way.

 

I saw in one of the private groups on Facebook where a poster was asking for some good pointers on a report of findings.

 

Immediately, about 7 of the 10 posts had to do with recommending ChiroUp and, one of those posts was mine. I said it’s a game changer because, well….it is. I started using it about a month ago and it has literally changed the game for my busy office without adding a lot of demand to my staff. We’re talking patient education, activities of daily living, patient follow up, patient exercise-rehab recommendations, and even expediting online reviews. I have tried several products and services during my 20 years and most of them are just hype and take your money.

 

In my experience, so far….ChiroUp has been beyond what I expected. I’m jaded as hell. But, when Dr. Bertelsman started showing it to me, my jaw dropped a bit. I think I started slobbering. I’m not sure. Anyway, he showed it to me for about a minute and a half and that was it. Shut up and just take my money.

 

I want you to know, I don’t have any “deal” set up with those guys. Not yet anyways!! Lol. If it’s up to me I will because they’re amazing but, as of now, they don’t sponsor this show, no affiliate marketing deal….nothing like that. I’m just like your buddy down the road telling you hey man, I’m doing this thing and it’s been pretty freaking great. You should look at it. That’s all.

 

If you want to look into ChiroUp, go to www.chiroup.com and give it a look-see. And, if you like what you see and join up, you may mention our podcast and me, Dr. Jeff Williams. It never hurts for people to know who was out there pumping their tires, ya know. Sometimes what goes around comes around and I believe in always trying to project the good mojo.

 

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

 

It’s all about headaches from this point forward today. I want to first direct you to a podcast we did that cited a bunch of headache papers that I hope you’ll go and listen to right after you listen to this one. It was Episode #14 but 14 is right smack dab in the middle of a series of podcasts I did on Debunking the myth that Chiropractors cause strokes. Specifically, the series starts on episode #13, #14 is the one with the headache research, and #15 is the conclusion of the stroke series we did. I CANNOT stress enough how valuable I feel those three episodes are.

 

We will have them linked in the show notes.

 

https://www.chiropracticforward.com/debunked-the-odd-myth-that-chiropractors-cause-strokes/

 

https://www.chiropracticforward.com/cf-episode-14-debunked-the-odd-myth-that-chiropractors-cause-strokes-part-2-of-3/

 

https://www.chiropracticforward.com/cf-015-debunked-the-odd-myth-that-chiropractors-cause-strokes-part-3-of-3/

 

We will get going with this paper from February of 2018 called, “Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for the care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial.” It was done by Haas et. al[1]. and was published in the prestigious Spine Journal on February 23, 2018. Here’s how chiropractors help headaches.

 

Why They Did It

Although the researchers know that spinal manipulation chiropractors help headaches (which is nice to see) there has been little information on the dosage of spinal manipulation for them. They wanted to evaluate the efficacy of chiropractic by comparing it to a light massage control group.

How They Did It

  • This is a two-site, open-label randomized controlled trial.
  • Participants were 256 adults with chronic cervicogenic headache.
  • The primary outcome was the number of days with cervicogenic headache in the previous 4 weeks evaluated at the 12- and 24-week primary endpoints
  • Secondary outcomes included cervicogenic headache days at remaining endpoints, pain intensity, disability, perceived improvement, medication use, and patient satisfaction.
  • Participants were randomized to four dose levels of chiropractic SMT: 0, 6, 12, or 18 sessions
  • They were treated three times per week for 6 weeks and received a focused light-massage control at sessions when SMT was not assigned
  • Linear dose effects and comparisons with the no-manipulation control group were evaluated at 6, 12, 24, 39, and 52 weeks.

 

Wrap It Up

In the authors’ conclusions, they say, “There was a linear dose-response relationship between spinal manipulative therapy visits and days with cervicogenic headache. For the highest and most effective dose of 18 spinal manipulative therapy visits, cervicogenic headache days were reduced by half and about 3 more days per month than for the light-massage control.”

Here’s one I thought was pretty darn cool when we talk about how chiropractors help headaches and it’s buried all the way down in the middle of a website for the Wiley Online Library. This site has all of the research covered at the 60 thAnnual Scientific Meeting American Headache Society June 28-July 1, 2018 at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis in San Francisco, CA.

This particular paper covered was by C. Bernstein and called “Rationale and Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Chiropractic Therapy for Migraine Pain Alleviation[2]”

Why They Did It

While medications are often the first?line treatment for a migraine, many migraineurs do not experience clinically meaningful responses to preventive drug treatments or discontinue medication use due to side effects. Chiropractic care is a non?pharmacologic intervention commonly used for the treatment of pain conditions, including a migraine. You got that right!

 

They go on to say, “Observational studies and small trials have shown that spinal manipulation may be an effective therapeutic technique to reduce migraine pain and disability. We present results of a meta?analysis of spinal manipulation on migraine pain and disability and describe the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating comprehensive chiropractic care for the treatment and prevention of migraines.”

 

Oh yeah!! Sounding good. It appears that indeed, chiropractors help headaches. This talk appears to be on a new study they will be going through based on some preliminary work here.

 

How They Did It

  • They searched PubMed and Cochrane Library databases for clinical trials that evaluated spinal manipulation and migraine-related outcomes published through April 2017
  • The effect sizes and heterogeneity for pain and disability were estimated using meta?analytic methods.
  • The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to evaluate the methodological quality of retrieved studies
  • The results of this meta?analysis informed the design of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the addition of chiropractic care to usual medical care for women diagnosed with low-frequency episodic migraine.

 

What They Found

  • On the basis of 6 identified RCTs, random effects models indicated that spinal manipulation significantly reduced pain with an overall moderate effect size
  • Spinal manipulation also significantly decreased disability with an overall moderate effect size
  • However, the existing studies focused primarily on isolated spinal manipulation and not on comprehensive chiropractic care. To address this gap in the literature, our RCT will assess the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of multi?modal chiropractic care for women aged 20?55 who experience 4?10 migraines per month and are not using preventive medications
  • Our modular chiropractic care approach may include, as needed, posture correction/spinal stabilization exercises, soft?tissue relaxation techniques, spinal manipulation/mobilization, breathing and relaxation techniques, stretches, self?care, ergonomic advice, and/or bracing and supports

 

Conclusion

The authors said the following, “Our meta?analysis indicated that spinal manipulation shows promise as a therapeutic technique to reduce migraine pain and disability, yet highlighted the need for rigorous studies evaluating the full scope of chiropractic care for migraineurs. The results of our meta?analysis provide the rationale for the design of our RCT.”

I can’t wait to see the result of the RCT. Wanna know why? Because I already know the results. At this point, it’s anecdotal but the results will show that chiropractors help headaches and migraines. I’m looking forward to hearing all about it.

 

If I don’t find it first, I know my colleague, Dr. Craig Benton down in Lampasas, TX. He’ll probably find it before me though. Lol. He’s on it every single day. I get a lot of information from a lot of different places but that guy just gets it first.

 

Lastly, I want to direct you to Episode #6 of our podcast. This one was with Dr. Tyce Hergert down in Southlake, TX called “Astounding Expert Information On Immediate Headache Relief. “

 

https://www.chiropracticforward.com/dr-tyce-hergert-astounding-expert-information-immediate-headache-relief/

 

We covered a paper. A paper that I thought had an outstanding quote in the conclusion.

 

The quote from the authors themselves reads as follows, “Upper cervical translatoric spinal mobilization intervention increased upper, and exhibited a tendency to improve general, cervical range of motion and induce immediate headache relief in subjects with cervicogenic headache[3].”

 

Now, in that episode, we explain that it was authored by Physical Therapists and that they have come up with their own term for a chiropractic adjustment and their term is “translatoric spinal mobilization.”

 

The point being that chiropractic adjustments can provide immediate relief for cervicogenic headaches. That’s sexy folks. Straight up awesome. Chiropractors help headaches.

 

The sub-points or something extra I’d like you to notice is the fact that physical therapists are moving in, adopting our ONE THING. So much so that they have taken it upon themselves to re-name our ONE THING for their own use.

 

This goes back to what we covered in episodes 28, 29, and 30….. We must integrate into the medical field and quit being out on the fringe. Otherwise, those that are already in the medical realm (physical therapists) will simply take our ONE THING, steal it, and we will still be sitting out there in the rain knocking on the window and watching them all eating steaks inside the private club. Lol.

 

That’s a little dramatic. There are those in our field that want to stay separate and distinct and I understand that. I understand your stance and your viewpoint. I just don’t agree with it. That’s all.

 

For me, integration into the medical realm ensures our profession’s survival and the health or our ONE THING. We make sure it sticks around. I’m afraid that if we stay out on the fringe, we LOSE our ONE THING to other professions, our reimbursements continue to fall, our income falls year after year because they getting “translatoric spinal manipulation” rather than chiropractic adjustments, and eventually, we cease to exist.

 

Just some random thoughts but, I truly think it’s time. Move toward the middle or suffer the consequences. I honestly see very few other options.

 

The research proves time and time again that we can EASILY move toward the middle. It’s coming out every week. More and more validation.

 

But, then there’s this. The ACA sent out an email recently discussing the fact that, in a continuing effort to be the absolute worst health insurance company in the world, United Healthcare is now discontinuing any coverage of chiropractic for the treatment of headaches[4]. What? What in the hell? Wait, let’s go through the website for UHC real quick so we know exactly what’s going on here. Got your gripey pants on? You’re going to need them. Chiropractors help headaches but UHC hasn’t received the message apparently.

 

On their website we’re linking here in the show notes:

https://www.uhcprovider.com/content/dam/provider/docs/public/policies/comm-medical-drug/manipulative-therapy.pdf

 

UHC says the following:

Manipulative therapy is unproven and/or not medically necessary for treating: ·Non-musculoskeletal disorders, including but not limited to:

o Lungs (e.g., asthma)
o Internal organs (e.g., intestinal)
o Neurological (e.g., headaches)
o Ear, nose, and throat (e.g., otitis media)

  • Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder
  • Scoliosis

Manipulative therapy is unproven and/or not medically necessary for preventive or maintenance care. The role of manipulative therapy in preventive or maintenance care has not been established in scientific literature. A beneficial impact on health outcomes has not been established.

They go on to say Craniosacral therapy (cranial manipulation/Upledger technique) or manipulative services that utilize nonstandard techniques including but not limited to applied kinesiology, National Upper Cervical Chiropractic Association (NUCCA), and neural organizational technique are unproven and/or not medically necessary for any indication.

Manipulative therapy is unproven and/or not medically necessary when ANY of the following apply:

  • The member’s condition has returned to the pre-symptom state.
  • Little or no improvement is demonstrated within 30 days of the initial visit despite modification of the treatment plan.
  • Concurrent manipulative therapy, for the same or similar condition, provided by another health professional whether or not the healthcare professional is in the same professional discipline.

I went that far into the paper just for the “huh, really?” effect but the main point here is, how can they say that spinal manipulation/mobilization is not clinically proven for headaches? In addition to the papers I pointed to here in this podcast, there are more in the links and episodes I provided. As in around 10 or so others showing and proving effectiveness. Just in episode 14 alone.

 

What exactly do they need and why the change?

 

Is this part of the Texas Medical Association’s attack on Texas Chiropractors where they are attempting to remove the neuro- from the neuromusculoskeletal treatment scope from chiropractors? It sounds like it to me when you look at it. I get the internal organs part. I get the asthma part. I do NOT understand how they classify headaches as strictly neuro in nature and have made a line where they do not cover any neuro treatment for chiropractors.

 

It’s unreal. It really is. Here on this site, they cite Chaibi et. al. (2017) and Seffinger and Tang (2017). In these papers they site, both conclude that spinal manipulation was effective. The second paper showed spinal mobilization to be more effective than physical therapy but….guess what. They need more studies. Probably studies like I’ve been telling you all about for 7 months now.

 

This kind of stuff makes me want to punch myself in the nose and go home and kid my daughter’s cat. Straight up punt that sucker. That’s nothing new though but seriously. To borrow a phrase from one of my very favorite football coaches, “This kind of garbage just makes my pee hot.” It really does folks.

 

Chiropractors help headaches. Every day all day and the research sure as hell shows it too.

 

Just keep on keepin on and stay strong, ladies and gents. What other option do you have without going back to school? It’s still the best time to be a chiropractor. It’s still the time in which there is more opportunity than ever before. This stupid insurance company cites only two papers and both of them showed effectiveness for headaches. It’s only a matter of time before all of the idiots start to catch up with the research and with what chiropractors have known for generations.

 

This week, I want you to go forward speaking with confidence and knowing that you are effective for headaches and migraines. You can change people’s lives. If you are not being effective for your patients’ headaches, seek some advice from a mentor. Sometimes it’s just a little tweak here and there and you’ll be on the road to being your patients’ hero. When done well, research backs us on this all over the place. For more proof, go check out show notes on Episode #14 or our Stroke blog at https://www.chiropracticforward.com/blog-post/debunked-the-odd-myth-that-chiropractors-cause-strokes-revisited/

Integrating Chiropractors

 

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

 

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability. It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

 

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.comand let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

 

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool.

 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

 

??Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

 

?Social Media Links

 

?iTunes

?Player FM Link

?Stitcher:

??TuneIn

About Dr. Jeff

 

 

  1. Haas M, Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial.Spine, 2018: p. S1529-9430.
  2. Bernstein C. Rationale and Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Chiropractic Therapy for Migraine Pain Alleviation. in 60th Annual Scientific Meeting American Headache Society. 2018. San Francisco Marriott Marquis San Francisco, CA.
  3. Malo-Urries M, Immediate Effects of Upper Cervical Translatoric Mobilization on Cervical Mobility and Pressure Pain Threshold in Patients With Cervicogenic Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial.J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2017. 40(9): p. 649-658.
  4. Policy, U.H.C.M. Manipulative Therapy. 2018 1 June 2018]; Available from: https://www.uhcprovider.com/content/dam/provider/docs/public/policies/comm-medical-drug/manipulative-therapy.pdf.