January 2019 - chiropracticforward January 2019 - chiropracticforward

Month: January 2019

CF 059: Don’t Be Dumb on Cervicogenic Headache

CF 059: Don’t Be Dumb on Cervicogenic Headache

Today we’re going to talk about headaches. More specifically, we’re going to talk about cervicogenic headaches. How can we recognize cervicogenic headache, and get better at diagnosing and treating cervicogenic headache?

But first, here’s that delicious bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have crashed into Episode #59 like a bull in a china cabinet. You know, I’ve been told before that I’m a little like a bull in a china cabinet. That what I don’t break I poo on. Was that more palatable than some of the other words I could have used? I certainly hope so because me saying it that way just doesn’t sound very Jeff-like but I try to keep it mostly high brow and not too profanity-laced. 

DACO

As always, let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. I decided I kind of dread the eLearning episodes. Although the information is excellent, I’m one of those that doesn’t want to miss a word in the notes. These can be somewhat complex topics and, I’m afraid that if I miss something, it’ll be important and I’ll have trouble making sense of it all when I re-visit it. 

That could be my undiagnosed anxiety issue at play. Who the hell knows but it’s a fact so that means that I have to transcribe the entire 20-40 minutes of video or I’m not happy with the final result of the class. There are notes on these classes. A worksheet that helps organize it all but, there is a lot on the videos that is not on the worksheet so transcribe I must and I’m starting to despise that process. 

It’s admittedly a quirk of mine and probably won’t be your experience on the deal if you give it a try. As a result, I have started combining the Communication Drills. So I’ll take an eLearning episode and then I’ll take a Communication Drill and basically alternate them to keep me from getting burned out and to keep me moving forward efficiently. I’m averaging 8 or so hours a week so we’re still clicking along like a tired locomotive. 

Recent classes have been Managing Migraine Headaches, Diagnosing Cervicogenic Headaches, A Neurological Approach to Scoliosis, and Thinking Laterally With The Disc Patient. 

Coming Up

I gotta tell you, you all really liked the episode we did with Dr. James Lehman, episode 55, and the one we did on what I despise about this profession, episode 56. We are up over 7,200 downloads and that’s pretty exciting Y’all. This little thing of ours is rocking and rolling and shows no signs of slowing down either. 

That’s because THE Dr. Christine Goertz is coming on the show in late February. Wow! That’s a biggie! I’m going to let you in on a little secret. You’d already know this if you were in our private Chiropractic Forward Group on Facebook. You would have even had the chance to suggest questions for me to ask her when she comes on the show. You should probably go ahead and become a member. 

Speaking of the episode where we talked about the magical disappearing osteophytes, I was a little worried if I’m being honest about that one. I hated being negative like that and I was a bit concerned some of you would have a problem with that. Oh contrare, I think I had more feedback on that one than any of our episodes. 

It appears you guys agree and there is indeed no room for that mystical hunk o junk in our great profession. Of course, there isn’t. We knew that. Sometimes you just have to blow off a little steam and be the old guy saying, “get off my lawn ya punks!”

That was episode 56 for me. “Get off my lawn and stop driving so fast in a 30 mph zone yeah steampunk loving jackasses! And quit looking at my daughter like that before I shoot you in the nose hole!” We’re in Texas and all. lol. 

Cervicogenic Headache

Alright, let’s tackle cervicogenic headache a bit here. The first thing I want to say here is that, prior to the DACO classes, I had assumed that cervicogenic headache had a much higher prevalence than it does in reality. In your clinic, it really doesn’t show up all that much compared to the other forms of headaches. 

Breaking that down a little, tension-type headaches are the most prevalent at 38% of cases, migraines are next at 10%, and cervicogenic headache brings up the rear-end of the group at about 4% of cases. 

If it only makes up 4% of cases, why the heck are we covering it this week you may ask. Well, let me answer that since you’re so damn inquisitive today. 

Because it still makes up your patient base, you need to be able to notice it, and it’s one of the forms we can be fairly effective in treating. 

The first thing we gotta do is rule out a pathological headache by testing 

  • Steady gait over a normal base
  • Normal vital signs
  • Normal Romberg’s test
  • Quick screen of cranial nerves looking for extra-ocular movements, nystagmus, symmetrical pupils with normal reaction to light, normal facial muscle tone, and things like that. 
  • And then a basic screen of tendon reflexes, motor power and pathological reflexes like Babinski’s and Hoffman reflexes

 

What Does It Look Like?

So, what does a cervicogenic headache typically look like? Well, the first thing is that it is technically a secondary headache which means it is the symptom of something else that’s going on. 

Cervicogenic headache is usually 

  • Unilateral, side-consistent pain referred from a source in the neck. In fact, many times, you can elicit the head pain by pressing on the facets of the C2/3 region. 
  • Usually, the pain starts in the upper cervical region and then spreads toward the front of the head, orbital region, temples, vertex, or ears.
  • The pain may also spread to the ipsilateral shoulder or arm
  • Also, the pain is precipitated or aggravated by special neck movements or sustained neck posture. 
  • It’s mostly in the adult population with females being four times more affected than men. 
  • Sufferers can have suboccipital neck pain, dizziness, and even lightheadedness 

Paper #1

Let’s look at this paper called “Cervical musculoskeletal impairment in frequent intermittent headache. Part 1: subjects with single headaches” authored by G. Jull and published in 2007 in the International Headache Society[1]. 

They were testing musculoskeletal function in headache types like tension-type, migraine, and cervicogenic.

In all but one measure (kinesthetic sense), the cervicogenic headache group were significantly different from the migraine, tension-type headache and control groups. 

They found that collectively, restricted movement, in association with palpable upper cervical joint dysfunction and impairment in the cranio-cervical flexion test, had 100% sensitivity and 94% specificity to identify cervicogenic headache. 

They found that collectively, restricted movement, in association with palpable upper cervical joint dysfunction and impairment in the cranio-cervical flexion test, had 100% sensitivity and 94% specificity to identify cervicogenic headache.

It doesn’t get much more sensitive and specific than that does it? 100% and 94%. Bam, you got a cervicogenic headache Patient Jones and I have pretty much zero doubt about that. Yes…that feels good to be that confident. 

Paper #2

This next paper is called “Upper cervical and upper thoracic manipulation vs. mobilization and exercise in patients with cervicogenic headache: a multi-center randomized clinical trial[2].” It was authored by James Dunning, and what looks like about 30 others and published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders in 2016. 

In the beginning here the authors say that no studies have directly compared the effectiveness of cervical and thoracic manipulation to mobilization and exercise in individuals with cervicogenic headache. Thus the reason for the study. 

They had 110 participants here that were randomized to receive both cervical and thoracic manipulation or mobilization and exercise. 

What They Found

“Six to eight sessions of upper cervical and upper thoracic manipulation were shown to be more effective than mobilization and exercise in patients with CH, and the effects were maintained at 3 months.”

Time for superhero sound effects….Bam, snap, pow, shazam!

One of these days, I’m really going to incorporate sound effects into my efforts here but until then, you’re stuck with my ridiculous superhero effects. Lol. 

Paper #3

Moving on, this next paper is called “Dose-response for chiropractic care of chronic cervicogenic headache and associated neck pain: a randomized pilot study.” It was authored by M Haas, et. al. and published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics[3]. 

Why They Did It

To acquire information for designing a large clinical trial and determining its feasibility and to make preliminary estimates of the relationship between headache outcomes and the number of visits to a chiropractor.

What They Found

There was substantial benefit in pain relief for 9 and 12 treatments compared with 3 visits.

The authors concluded, “A large clinical trial on the relationship between pain relief and the number of chiropractic treatments is feasible. Findings give preliminary support for the benefit of larger doses, 9 to 12 treatments, of chiropractic care for the treatment of cervicogenic headache.”

Paper #4

Roughly that same group led by M.  Haas, et. al. later published this one in 2018, just last year, called “Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial.” It was published in Spine Journal[4]. 

They were looking to settle in on the optimal number of visits for the care of cervicogenic headache with spinal manipulative therapy. 

It was a two-site, open-open-table randomized controlled trial with 256 participants. 

What They Found

There was a linear dose-response relationship between spinal manipulative therapy visits and days with cervicogenic headache. For the highest and most effective dose of 18 treatments, days suffering from cervicogenic headache were reduced by half and about 3 more days per month than for the light-massage control group. 

And there you have it people, more information than you probably expected to get on Cervicogenic headache today. 

This week, I want you to go forward knowing more about cervicogenic headache than you did before you listened to this podcast. I want you to see it, test for it, recognize it, and fix it!

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out.

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. Jull G, Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairment in Frequent Intermittent Headache. Part 1: Subjects With Single Headaches. International Headache Society, 2007. 27(7).

2. J, D., Upper cervical and upper thoracic manipulation versus mobilization and exercise in patients with cervicogenic headache: a multi-center randomized clinical trial. BMC Musculoskelet Disord, 2016. 17(1): p. 1.

3. Haas M, Conservative physical therapy management for the treatment of cervicogenic headache: a systematic review. J Man Manip Ther, 2013. 21(2): p. 113-24.

4. Haas M, Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial. Spine, 2018: p. S1529-9430.

CF 006: With Dr. Tyce Hergert: Astounding Expert Information On Immediate Headache Relief

CF 050: Chiropractic Care – Text Neck, Headaches, Migraines

CF 041: w/ Dr. William Lawson – Research For Neck Pain

 

 

CF 058: The Patient Experience, Lumbar Stenosis, & Fibromyalgia 

CF 058: The Patient Experience, Lumbar Stenosis, & Fibromyalgia 

Today we’re going to talk about the patient experience being more important than your marketing, we’ll talk about some research from JAMA on lumbar stenosis, and some research on upper cervical manipulative therapy on fibromyalgia. 

But first, here’s that bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have clumsily stumbled into Episode #58 knocking lamps off of the end tables and generally making a mess of the place.

DACO

As with every week, let’s talk a bit about the DACO program and my progress. I was doing the Communication Drills but they kept referring to eLearning Episodes. So let’s break that down a bit real quick for those interested in the program. The bulk is made up of 40 Diagnostic Drills, 46 Communication Drills, and 17 eLearning Episodes. 

You get 2 hrs credit for each Diagnostic or Communication Drill and you get 3 hours credits for each eLearning Episode. 

Now, since Communication Drills kept referring to eLearning Episodes, I figured I would switch focus and go through them and then return to the Communication Drills. Still with me?

The eLearning Episodes are very much video based on a downloadable worksheet to take notes on. I take notes digitally though so I’m still getting my angle of attack down on these and how I want to best tackle them and have great notes I’m getting it figured out. 

DACO Classes

So far, I’ve taken classes on Adjusting locally and thinking globally about how a cervical adjustment can affect even the low back. The neurology is amazing. A class on blurry vision from a pain in the neck. Again, the neurology people. I don’t know how I made it day to day before this stuff. Then last weekend I took one on making sense of a headache. 

Outstanding information and all lined up to make you better, make you wiser in your decision-making, and making you a better communicator with your patients and colleagues. 

If you’re waiting to get started on the DACO, get started. I’ll be glad to help you if you’ll email me at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com

I’m about wrapped up with some cool stuff that you all may be interested in on our website at chiropracticforward.com. If you’ll go there and sign up for our newsletter on our home page, I’ll be able to let you know all about it when it’s ready to roll out.   

Great week for listens Y’all. Thank you for tuning in. Everyone loved Dr. James Lehman’s episode. That was a big one for us! If you missed it, it’s episode #55. Candy for your ears. I see that sucker being the number one listened to podcast pretty quickly. 

Onto the Discussion

Let’s get to trying to make your practice better. This first one we’ll discuss is titled, “Patient experience five times as likely to drive consumer loyalty as marketing” by Christopher Cheney with HealthLeaders(Cheney C 2018). It was published on December 28, 2018. Once again, I know you dig the new stuff. 

If you’re getting after it. If you’re hustling, then you’re marketing. Marketing isn’t something you do once, is it? Oh no, it isn’t. It’s something you do every damn day if you’re doing it effectively. It’s exhausting, isn’t it? But it can be fun too. 

Marketing

Isn’t it fascinating that just changing the color of the border on your marketing material has the potential to elicit a different behavior from the recipient? Or changing the color of the shirt that the person in the ad is wearing affects the response rate? It’s amazing. But, it’s also exhausting to contemplate all of the different combinations of possibilities of words, colors, placements, and all of that crap. 

Good grief. You could make yourself crazy and how many chiropractors usually have the budget to hire a full-time marketing person that actually had a marketing degree? Not many would be the answer you’re looking for if you were confused on that. It was more rhetorical than anything. 

Here in this article, Mr. Cheney says that the patient experience while in your office is the primary driver of patients’ consumer loyalty at health systems, hospitals, and physician practices. He based this information on a recent Press Ganey report I would normally link for you in the show notes but it looks like a bit of click bate. As in leave your email and get the report crapola and I’m not doing that to my peeps. Ain’t nobody got time for that. 

Hell, I can hardly get you guys to give ME your email address and most of you are loyal listeners! Lol. 

Consumer Loyalty

Anyway, he says that consumer loyalty is vital for not only your profit at the end of the month but also helps you take better care of long-term patients with multiple chronic illnesses. 

Hell, that’s why we got into this business; taking care of people. I have to say that if you got into this business to get rich, you’re taking the long way around buddy. Lol. Most of us got into this business to take care of people when nobody else was able to get results with them. And then hopefully keep them that way!

Here’s what raised my antennae straight up, he said, “Patient experience is FIVE TIMES more likely to influence brand loyalty than conventional marketing tools such as billboards, or television, print, or radio ads.”

WHAT?

What was that? Let me repeat that just in case my DACO talk put you to sleep. Hey, wake the hell up and listen to this. “Patient experience is FIVE TIMES more likely to influence brand loyalty than conventional marketing tools such as billboards, or television, print, or radio ads.”

That is astounding. Of course, some of you already had this figured out and being 20 + years into this dealio, I have it figured out to an extent as well but FIVE TIMES more effective than billboards, TV, print, or radio?

I did NOT have that much figured out. Do you know how I know I didn’t have all of that figured out? Well, it’s because I am spending too much damn money on all that crapola. They interviewed over 1,000 adults on this survey. 

I do have it figured out to the extent that I tell my staff that we are certainly in the healthcare business but they’re fools if they think we are not also in the customer service business. You better believe it. I tell them that I’d much rather a patient leave feeling the same but feeling great about the people they met and the experience they had here and feeling hopeful about what we can accomplish with them as opposed to them leaving my office sore because I either rushed through the appointment or thought we’d equate appointment success with a popping noise and pushed so hard that I finally got a pop sound but ended up making the patient feel worse. 

That goes for the front desk too, doesn’t it? They’re the first point of contact and the last point of contact. If they’re not friendly when people come in and greet them warmly and are very welcoming, well….we’re already behind the 8-ball there and had better make up some ground in the back of the office. And when they leave…..oh nobody likes to pay their own money out of their own pocket and they damn sure don’t like to pay it to someone they don’t like personally. 

Here is a quote from the report, “Healthcare organizations can tap the power of patient experience, the report says. “To harness that influence, providers should capitalize on the power of word-of-mouth marketing by viewing the patient experience as an essential part of their acquisition strategy. By gaining a deep understanding of what gets people talking about positive patient experiences, identifying opportunities to advance the conversation and disseminating key information, healthcare systems can naturally align the mission of delivering safe, high-quality, patient-centered care with the business of acquiring and retaining consumers.”

The Big 4

They went on to line our 4 Big One’s that should be a part of any healthcare facility’s strategy for getting and keeping patients. They were:

  1. Give every patient a voice – They’re not just talking about listening to them when they visit your office and tell you about their conditions. They describe delivering surveys via text and email as well as the standard outreach protocols. 
  2. Identify factors that drive and erode patient loyalty. They say to really know where you can improve, you gotta know positive loyalty metrics on things like the likelihood to refer or recommend your office to their network of people. Imagine man, being a former member of BNI, they teach that each person, whether they know it or not, has a network of 250 people in their lives. I get 55-65 new patients per month. That’s 13,750-16,250 potential work of mouth contacts that can either hear the good about our office or, if we allow them to catch us on bad days….that’s up to 16,250 people that can hear bad things about us. You can see why it’s so important to have positive patient experiences in your office just as often as you possibly can. Especially in the days of social media. There is no room for ego, for talking down to your patients or scolding your patients, or any of that crap. Patient-centered is more than an idea, it’s how you’d better be carrying yourself. 
  3. Use natural language processing to analyze comments. What the hell does that mean? Well, they say that it is language that allows aggregation of comments into clear brand equities and liabilities, allowing for proactive management of both experience and brand. That sounds like an overly wordy and annoying resume if I’m being honest. Basically, it’s using computers to analyze emails, customer feedback forms, surveys and things like that to identify the root cause of customer dissatisfaction or, we hope, customer satisfaction. I’d like to lead you further down this path but, obviously, I have more to learn on it myself. 
  4. Post ratings and reviews in physician profiles. Ensure that future patients have the most convenient access to all information they seek by including comments – both positive and negative. I can’t deal with negative comments. They hurt. Lol. 

Reviews

They also say that you need to be earning quality reviews online for Yelp, Google, Facebook, and all that good stuff. If you don’t know the value of reviews at this point, you just might be a lost cause. Lol. 

They also say you must address negative reviews online in a professional way while understanding that negative reviews are an opportunity to learn and improve. 

But, when it’s not right and borderline illegal, I believe it’s OK to have your attorney contact the person leaving that negative review. Here’s what happened. We offer a service. Not chiropractic but a service that a girl that treated here for some time decided she would begin offering here in town without being certified in any way to perform. 

OK, annoying for sure but then she, one of her little buddies and her boyfriend go online and leave us bad reviews for the exact same service. So there we were with 80 or so 5-star reviews. Not one negative review. And then three 1 star reviews popping up out of nowhere. Nope, she got a call from my attorney and they went away very quickly. 

Ain’t nobody got time for that crap, right? I know I don’t and I have little tolerance for people that want to try to tear down something others have built just to try to further themselves. 

Before my face gets too red and I start to stutter, let’s move onto the next topic. 

Next Paper

This next paper is called, “The addition of upper cervical manipulative therapy in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.” The lead author on this one is Ibrahim Moustafa and it was published in Rheumatology International in July of 2015(Moustafa I 2015). 

And can we just stop a second appreciate the last name Moustafa? Can we do that? Holy cow, if I had a good head of hair and a last name like Moustafa, I’d have the world on a leash ya know. But I don’t have good hair and my name is Williams (so boring) so let’s move on. 

Why They Did It

The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate and long-term effects of a one-year multimodal program, with the addition of upper cervical manipulative therapy, on fibromyalgia management outcomes in addition to three-dimensional (3D) postural measures.

It was a randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. 

What They Found

The addition of the upper cervical manipulative therapy to a multimodal program is beneficial in treating patients with fibro.

I threw that one in for you Upper Cervical guys. You’re getting some love when it comes to treating fibro and I know fibro sufferers will appreciate that. 

I think, after learning more about the upper cervical spine in the DACO course, that it’s fascinating to think about. There is so much going on in the upper three segments in terms of sensorimotor and proprioception that it just blows your mind. 

Last Paper

OK, on to the last paper. This one is called “Comparative Clinical Effectiveness of Nonsurgical Treatment Methods in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial(Schneider M 2019)”. It was authored by Michael Schneider, DC, Ph.D., Carlo Ammendolia, DC (who we have covered here before for stenosis), and Donald Murphy, DC et. al. It appeared in JAMA on January 4, 2019, and here’s how it goes. 

Why They Did It

The question to answer for them was, “What is the comparative effectiveness of 3 types of nonsurgical treatment options for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis?”

Now the 3 types of protocols they tested were medical care, group exercise, and manual therapy/individualized exercise. 

The medical care consisted of medications and/or epidural injections. 

The group exercise classes were supervised by fitness instructors in senior community centers. 

The manual therapy/individualized exercise consisted of spinal mobilization (because it works and is awesome I assume), stretches, and strength training provided by chiropractors and PTs. 

A combination of manual therapy/individualized exercise provides greater short-term improvement in symptoms and physical function and walking capacity than medical care or group exercises, although all 3 interventions were associated with improvements in long-term walking capacity.

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out.

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

  • Cheney C (2018) “PATIENT EXPERIENCE FIVE TIMES AS LIKELY TO DRIVE CONSUMER LOYALTY AS MARKETING.” HealthLeaders.
  • Moustafa I (2015). “The addition of upper cervical manipulative therapy in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.” Rheum Inter 35(7): 1163-1174.
  • Schneider M, A. C., Murphy D, (2019). “Comparative Clinical Effectiveness of Nonsurgical Treatment Methods in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis A Randomized Clinical Trial.” JAMA Network Open 2(1): e186828.

CF 045: Harvard Health, Low Back Stenosis, Allergy Autism

CF 016: Review of The Lancet Article on Low Back Pain (Pt. 1)

 

CF 057: What Is Contributing To Low Back Pain And More Opioid Bashing

CF 057: What Is Contributing To Low Back Pain And More Opioid Bashing

Today we’re going to talk about What Is Contributing To Low Back Pain And More Opioid Bashing from us. We hate them and they don’t do any good anyway so why did 72,000 people have to die at their hands last year in America?

But first, here’s that bumper music.

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have fumbled your way into Episode #57

Junk I Say

Let’s first talk a bit about junk I say. I drive myself crazy and here’s why; I get flustered sometimes. I don’t know why. Honestly, I’d like to eventually go on the speaking circuit but I think I’ll be terrible at it. Lol. I get flustered. 

I always listen to the episodes after they post. For a couple of reasons but it’s kind of like why a football team will watch game tape the day and week after a game. I do the same thing. I want to identify where I can improve and how I can make myself and the show better from week to week. 

Well, I invariably catch myself saying stuff that makes no sense. Like in the recent episode where I discussed the lack of research for lumbar fusion, I referred to an orthopedic surgeon as an osteopath. What? Trust me…..I know the damn difference so things like that make me want to punch myself in the nose a little. 

Another is that, without thinking, I’ve been calling it the diplomate of American chiropractic orthopedists. Yeah….that’s not what it is and I know that. Lol. It’s the Diplomate of the Academy of Chiropractic Orthopedists and those folks can be a member of the American Chiropractic Orthopedists. You see the confusion, right?

Anyway….I’m not a dummy people. Well, most days anyway. I still have my brain farts but I’m usually fairly put together. Or at least I like to think I am. Reminds me of a comedian I heard when I was a kid. He said, “I may look dumb, but that doesn’t mean I’m not!” Yeah….so you just think about that for a bit. 

The DACO

Speaking of the DACO program, “What’s the latest?”, you may ask. To that I would answer that a lot is going on actually. I slowed down for a bit but picked it back up during the holidays with the spare time I had. 

More communication drills including ideas and instruction on how to tactfully disagree with our medical counterparts. For instance, if they diagnose a patient with a disc and we are CERTAIN it’s an SI, how are you going to let them down softly and keep them from going away mad ala Motley Crue…girl….don’t go away mad. Just go away. 

You know we all have egos and you know damn well that “king ego” exists in the medical world. How do you tell those people they’re at odds with the research? I’m afraid there are some of them that would rather be wrong than be corrected. 

How do you tell them that they diagnosed a tension-type headache when, in reality, the symptoms are more in line with a cervicogenic headache? And then, how do you tell a GP that probably doesn’t like cervical manipulation that you recommend just that?

Things that make you go “Hmmmm….”

At the end of each of the Communication Drills, they give you a script to help you in the future should the need pop up for you to artfully and tactfully slap around Mr. King Ego without them really knowing you payahed them across the face with a glove. 

Short Show 

Alright, it’s a crazy week. I’m trying to close out 2018 as far as stats go and all that good stuff so this episode ain’t gonna be a big one. 

Before we get to it though, I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. It’s just an email. We’ll send you one once a week when a new episode pops up and, if we have something cool to tell you about, I’ll include it in that email. No extra emails. Don’t be so stingy with that damn email address. 

Don’t be like a college kid with the last piece of pizza. Don’t be that kid. 

Onto the Research

Let’s get to the goodies, folks. Let’s start with this one from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders by Shanthi Ramanathan, Peter Hibbert, Louise Wiles, Christopher Maher, and William Runicman called “What is the association between the presence of comorbidities and the appropriateness of care for low back pain? A population-based medical record review study[1].”

 

First thing here is that Chris Maher is a busy guy, y’all. Seriously. He is a Physical Therapist and I believe lives in Australia if I remember correctly. He was on a paper we discussed recently having to do with lumbar fusion as well as being on The Lancet series of papers for low back pain. He’s a mover and shaker

Why They Did It

Knowing that low back pain is non-specific in 90% of cases, low back pain is treated as an independent entity even though we know other conditions exist with it or contribute to it. What comorbidities? Things like obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis, etc…

What They Found

One hundred and sixty-four LBP patients were included in the analysis. Over 60% of adults with LBP in Australia had one of 17 comorbidities documented, with females being more likely than males to have comorbid conditions.

Wrap Up

This study established that the presence of comorbidities is associated with poorer care for LBP. Understanding why this is so is an important direction for future research.

Paper #2

Onward we march…. This one is called “Chiropractors’ views on the use of patient-reported outcome measures in clinical practice; a qualitative study.” It was written with Michelle Holmes as the lead author followed by Felicity Bishop, David Newell, Jonathan Field, and George Lewith and it was published in Chiropractic and Manual Therapies in December of 2018[2]. 

I know you people like the new stuff. 

Why They Did It

Patient-reported outcome measures (also known as OATS in my office and probably your office as well. OATS meaning Outcome Assessments)

Anyway, OATS are widely available for use in musculoskeletal care there’s not much research exploring the implementation of OATS in clinical practice. They wanted to see what chiropractors’ views were on OATS to identify any barriers and facilitators to implementing OATS in chiropractic care.

What They Found

“Chiropractors are increasingly using OATS in their clinical practice. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the views of chiropractors on using OATS. Exploring chiropractors’ experience of using OATS, this study identified how clinician knowledge and engagement and organizational barriers and facilitators affect implementing OATS in chiropractic care, such as choosing the appropriate OATS and systems to use in their practice. Chiropractors also identified possible training needs of chiropractors regarding OATS, with training including the process and benefits of using OATS in clinical practice.”

Opioids

Now, in our “beating a dead horse” segment, let’s bash the hell out of opioids, shall we? Well, don’t mind if I do!

This one is by Jason Busse, a Chiropractor by the way, and associate professor in the department of anesthesia at McMaster University’s school of medicine in Ontario, Canada……. Canada has it going on, folks. Seriously.

Here’s a chiropractor in the department of anesthesia at a school of medicine. We need to get that guy on our podcast don’t you think?

The paper was also written by Li Wang, Ph.D., and Mostafa Kamaleldin. Easy for you to say. 

It’s called “Opioids for Chronic Noncancer Pain; A systematic review and meta-analysis[3]” and appeared in JAMA in December of 2018. 

Why They Did It

They wanted to find out if the use of opioids to treat chronic noncancer pain was associated with greater benefits or harms compared with placebo and alternative analgesics.

Wrap It Up

In this meta-analysis of RCTs of patients with chronic noncancer pain, evidence from high-quality studies showed that opioid use was associated with statistically significant but small improvements in pain and physical functioning, and increased risk of vomiting compared with placebo. Comparisons of opioids with nonopioid alternatives suggested that the benefit for pain and functioning may be similar, although the evidence was from studies of only low to moderate quality.

CNN’s Spin 

CNN actually did an article by Michael Nedelman[4], on this paper where they get a little deeper saying the following, “For adults with chronic pain, opioids offer narrow improvements over placebo for pain and physical functioning, on average, according to a new analysis published Tuesday. And the majority of patients will experience no meaningful benefit.”

Subgroups of the studies included in the analysis suggest that non-opioid alternatives — such as NSAIDs, certain antidepressants and medical cannabis — may offer similar benefits to opioids on average. But the evidence for that is less strong, Busse said.

Question

Here’s my question for Dr. Busse, “Considering the fact that the American College of Physicians and The Lancet promote spinal manipulative therapy for acute and chronic low back pain as an alternative to opioids, and considering you are a chiropractor, why did your research not include spinal manipulative therapy as one of the alternative treatments?”

My guess is that maybe there were not enough randomized controlled trials comparing spinal manipulative therapy directly to opioids? I’m not sure why, to be honest. 

What We Know

But, we do know from JAMA that a current review found that spinal manipulation therapy is associated with moderate improvements in pain and function in patients with acute low back pain[5].

We know from Keeney et al that there “Reduced odds of surgery were observed for…those whose first provider was a chiropractor. 42.7% of workers [with back injuries] who first saw a surgeon had surgery, in contrast to only 1.5% of those who saw a chiropractor[6].”

From Haas et. al[7]., we know “Acute and chronic chiropractic patients experienced better outcomes in pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction; clinically important differences in pain and disability improvement were found for chronic patients.”

There are so many others that I just don’t have the time to get into right now but, I’m certainly interested in papers comparing the two directly to each other. I bet I already know the answer and I bet you do too. 

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

Here’s why you know the answer already……it’s because we know that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out.

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

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TuneIn

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. Ramanthan S, H.P., Wiles L, Maher C, Runicman W,, What is the association between the presence of comorbidities and the appropriateness of care for low back pain? A population-based medical record review study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord, 2018. 19(391).

2. Holmes M, B.F., Newell D, Field J, Lewith G,, Chiropractors’ views on the use of patient-reported outcome measures in clinical practice: a qualitative study. Chiropr Man Therap, 2018. 26(50).

3. Busse J, W.L., Kamaleldin M,, Opioids for Chronic Noncancer Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA, 2018. 320(23): p. 2448-2460.

4. Nedelman, M., Opioids offer little chronic pain benefit and wane over time, study says, in CNN. 2018: CNN Online.

5. Page N, Association of Spinal Manipulative Therapy With Clinical Benefit and Harm for Acute Low Back Pain. Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), 2107. 317(14): p. 1451-1460.

6. Keeney BJ, Early predictors of lumbar spine surgery after occupational back injury: results from a prospective study of workers in Washington State. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2013. May 15(38): p. 11.

7. Haas M, A practice-based study of patients with acute and chronic low back pain attending primary care and chiropractic physicians: two-week to 48-month follow-up. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2004. Mar-Apr;27(3): p. 160-9.

CF 025: Vets With Low Back Pain. Usual Care + Chiropractic vs. Usual Care Alone

CF 027: WANTED – Safe, Nonpharmacological Means Of Treating Spinal Pain

CF 031: No More High Risk & Useless Drugs From Here On – Getting Off Opioids

CF 026: Chiropractic Better Than Physical Therapy and Usual Medical Care For Musculoskeletal Issues

 

 

 

CF 056: What Does A Spinal Manipulation Do In Medical Terms & What I Despise About My Profession

Today we’re going to talk about what a chiropractic spinal manipulation is, we’ll talk about what it does and what happens there. We’re also going to talk about what I sincerely despise about our great profession. Depending on how fired up I get here, this one should be a good episode.

CF 055: w/ Dr. James Lehman – The Future Of Chiropractic, Chiropractic Specialization, & Chiropractic Integration

CF 055: w/ Dr. James Lehman – The Future Of Chiropractic, Chiropractic Specialization, & Chiropractic Integration  

Today we’re going to talk to one of the giants in our profession, Dr. James Lehman. We will be talking to Dr. James Lehman all about all sorts of things but mostly about the future of chiropractic. What is it looking like for those of us in the profession over the course of the next 15-30 years?

Dr. James Lehman, FACO - University of Bridgeport Connecticut

But first, here’s that delicious bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

 

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  We will get to Dr. James Lehman soon. 

Introduction

You have fluttered into Episode #55 kind of like the feather on Forrest Gump. Come on, you know the feather from literally one of the best movies of all time. Yes, that feather. 

Diplomate of the Academy of Chiropractic Orthopedists

This is normally the point in the program where I mention the DACO program and how I am progressing through it but, for reasons that will become obvious fairly quickly, we are going to save that talk for just a little later in our program. 

However, I will tell you I have 80 online hours at this point and some of my more recent classes have been Why does my shoulder keep hurting and how to diagnose a tension-type headache. If you recall from a week or so ago, two classes on migraines were among the classes so, after this last week, I’m getting a handle on the headache mystery. 

I have just about completed all of the Diagnostic Drills. There are 40 of them and I’ve finished 39 of them. The last one is on ankle sprain and what we really need to know about them. Then, we move on to Communication Drills that reinforce these Diagnostic Drills and help you write to your colleagues in an effective and professional way to describe your findings. I’m looking forward to those!

Introduction of Dr. James Lehman

Now, let’s go ahead and get on with the reason we’re all here. Before we speak with Dr. James Lehman, I want to go through a little background information on him for you so you are well aware of who he is and where he is coming from. 

Dr. James Lehman is an Associate Professor of Clinical Sciences at the University of Bridgeport/College of Chiropractic and Director of Health Sciences Postgraduate Education (HSPED). 

Dr. James Lehman completed his MBA at the University of New Mexico and a doctorate in chiropractic medicine at the Logan College of Chiropractic in St. Louis, Missouri.

Dr. James Lehman is a board-certified, chiropractic orthopedist. He teaches orthopedic and neurological examination and differential diagnosis of neuromusculoskeletal conditions. In addition, he provides clinical rotations for fourth-year chiropractic students and chiropractic residents in the community health center and a sports medicine rotation in the training facility of the local professional baseball team. 

As Director, Dr. James Lehman developed the three-year, full-time resident training program in chiropractic orthopedics and neuromusculoskeletal medicine. The program offers training within primary care facilities of a Federally Qualified Health Center and Patient-Centered Medical Home. While practicing in New Mexico, he mentored fourth-year, UNM medical students. 

Welcome to the show Dr. James Lehman, it’s an honor to have you on the Chiropractic Forward Podcast this week. 

Questions for Dr. Lehman

How did the job at UofB become a reality for you? How did you make that happen or even make it a possibility?

Can you tell me about your position at UofB? 

What are your responsibilities? 

What does a regular day for you look like? 

Dr. Lehman and I became acquainted with each other through the DACO program. In case you have been hiding under a rock, zoning off during our podcasts, or maybe this is the very first podcast you’ve listened to of ours, DACO stands for Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedists. 

What got you so interested in the Orthopedic side of our profession? 

What was it that made you want to specialize originally?

Can you tell us a little about your experience with chiropractic integration over the years? 

Have you had some battles to fight internally against medical practitioners?

What are some of the pitfalls and what are some of the rewards beyond seeing the patients recover?

Can you tell us about FQHCs? I had no idea they existed, especially in my city, until you showed me. Integrating into an FQHC was something that was never on my radar until we talked in Dallas.

At this point in our discussion, I need to tell you, the audience, that Dr. Lehman has played a vital role in furthering the DACO program. Through his position at the University of Bridgeport Connecticut, and through a partnership of sorts with online education through Chiropractic Development International out of Australia, obtaining the DACO has become very do-able and very attainable for all that may be so inclined. 

Dr. Lehman, can you tell us a little about how you and the University of Bridgeport got involved in the DACO and how it’s going so far? How did you identify the need and then go about filling that need?

Can you tell us why you feel like specialization like the DACO is so important to doctors of chiropractic these days? 

Why has this become your mission?

Through email, you suggested to me that, for the chiropractic profession to gain the respect of the healthcare system, a reasonable definition of chiropractic would be a good starting point. You offered a definition that doesn’t restrict providers nor does it highlight ‘subluxation.’ That definition is as follows:

“The evidence-based practice of differential diagnosis, patient-centered treatment, and prevention of pain and human disease as taught by CCE-approved chiropractic colleges, institutions, or schools.”

Tell me how you came up with this definition. 

Just to tell a quick personal experience, I have been introduced before by one neurosurgeon to another neurosurgeon using a disclaimer. He said, “He’s not one of THOSE chiropractors. He’s one of the good guys.” Which, I have to say that I appreciated the vote of confidence but at the same time it made me think, “With such a prevailing sentiment toward our profession, how will we ever integrate successfully or is it even possible?”

Do you think that even those of us that are specializing are going to be forever introduced with a disclaimer? I personally don’t see how a profession as split as ours progresses and integrates successfully. Is there a solution to this or are we just stuck with the split and the internal fighting?

With the knowledge that PTs are now utilizing spinal manipulative therapy, what do you feel is going to happen with our profession in the next 15-30 years?

In the two classes I’ve sat through with you as a speaker, you were adamant about Informed Consent. I read your paper on that topic after I got back from Dallas and thought it was pretty interesting. Informed Consent doesn’t sound like a particularly interesting or sexy topic to the general population so, would you mind telling us about that and what interested you enough in a topic like Informed Consent to actually publish a paper on it?

We covered the vast divide in our profession, what are some other big obstacles you see on the horizon for our profession right now?

In our private Chiropractic Forward Group, when we discussed you episode coming on the show, Dr. Brandon Steele said I need to ask you this question, “What can students do right now to prepare for current trends in Healthcare? Are there residencies, certifications, internships or other equivalents they should be considering going through to prepare for their future after graduation?”

Also in the private group, Dr. William Lawson, who has been a guest with us before, told me to ask you about rural healthcare centers and how a chiropractor can work in or own a rural healthcare center. 

 being with us and taking time out of your day. I really appreciate you and what you are doing for our profession. I don’t know where we would be without folks like you and others just like you. 

Integrating Chiropractors

 

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out.

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

CF 029: w/ Dr. Devin Pettiet – Is Chiropractic Integration Healthy For The Profession?

CF 039: Communicating Chiropractic

CF 046: Chiropractic Effectiveness – Chiropractic Integration – Chiropractic Future