Cervical Curvature

Easy, Cheap Way To Fix Cervical Curvature & SMT For Chronic Neck Pain

CF Ep. 213: Easy, Cheap Way To Fix Cervical Curvature & SMT For Chronic Neck Pain Today we’re going to talk about Easy, Cheap Way To Fix Cervical Curvature & SMT For Chronic Neck Pain But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music    

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Go to Amazon and check our my book called The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research. It’s a great resource for patient education and for YOU. It saves you time in putting talks together or just staying current on research. It’s categorized into  sections and written in a way that is easy to understand for you and patients. Just search for it on Amazon. That’s the Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic by Jeff Williams. 
  • Then go Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group, and then 
  • Review our podcast on whatever platform you’re listening to 
  • Last thing real quick, we also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #213 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about Intermittent Fasting & Dementia And Your Level Of Activity. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

Alright, no…it’s not just you….I’m a little slower than normal right now. For most of us, that’s the nature of the beast. We just slow down in January because most of us take insurance and most of those plans re-set in January. People haven’t met their deductibles. They don’t like to spend their own money.  And that’s OK. Speaking from 24 years of experience, it’s normal and you’ll start seeing it pick back up around mid to late February. Definitely by March.  Like I sadi last week, this is the time that we start playing catch up and taking care of all of the stuff that’s been sitting on the back burner.  So start dusting off that stack on your desk and working through it while you have the time.    I want to be honest. Which I always am. I think I’m in a mid-life crisis. I’m tired of replacing employees. Re-hiring, etc. I’m tired of the same old questions we get from patients. I’m tired of dealing with the day-to-day stuff I’ve dealt with. Some of you will love what you’re doing so much that you’ll want to die in your office at 84 years old working on someone. 

And wouldn’t that be an awful experience for the patient? Just as a side thought. Lol. 

Anyway, that’s not me. When I’m answering the question about why someone’s neck is hurting for the umpteenth time, the call for more freedom of time gets stronger.  And stronger and stronger.  That’s the reason that over the last few years I have started cultivating the side gigs. The exit strategy. Looky here; I write and perform music, I paint, I draw, I play the guitar, I build furniture, I sculpt, I throw the discus and want to compete in old man track meets, and I love spending time with my family and traveling.  So…how the hell do you do all of that while you’re in a clinic all day every day your entire life? The answer is….you don’t. You don’t do the things that feed your soul. You either don’t do them at all, or you don’t do them very often.

Until you’re 65 or so for most people. Well, I don’t plan on being most, folks. So, how do you own the practice instead of the practice owning you? Great question. I don’t know but here are some of the avenues I’m using to try to walk the path. 

  • Specialization and Board Certification
  • Nurse Practitioner
  • Associate chiropractor – If you’re interested in working for me, email me folks. [email protected] I’m looking. 
  • Real Estate Investing
  • Voice Over
  • Authorship
  • Speaking and Mentoring

In fact, I have a big presentation coming up at the Texas Chiropractic Association’s MidWinter Conference in Lubbock, TX on February 18th. It’s called Chronic Pain And The Upregulated Central Nervous System. I’m in the process of building that talk as we speak.  If that sounds like something your group or association could use, email me at [email protected] and let’s connect.

I’d love to come present for you and your peeps. 

So, anyway, I do all kinds of things. But those are the biggies.  Get your exit number in place. Even if you’re brand new. You gotta have your loans paid. You gotta have your retirement finances in the process. You gotta have investments working. Once that’s handled, what is the exit number that would make you secure to make your exit.  Or to make a Hybrid Exit. What’s that exactly? A Hybrid Exit would look different for different folks. For one person that might mean treating patients 2 days per week. For others, it might mean strictly being the owner but exiting patient treatment completely. It could mean a million things but, at the price point some of us make per year, it can be difficult to build enough side gig to replace that income.  For me, just looking at the numbers and potential, while keeping risk mitigation in mind, real estate seems the quickest way when you combine that with the clinic integration and hiring an associate chiro. Combining these three may get me there.  Then you throw in this voice-over blessing that I started last year…..wow. That was out of nowhere, was a complete surprise, and an amazing blessing. Voice over, by itself, has more than funded the down payment and the furnishing of our very first short-term rental house and investment I’ve been mentioning more and more recently. 

Let’s be honest though, you don’t have to be in voice-over to invest. You just have to keep the overhead down and save up enough for a downpayment. The rest will take care of itself. And the earlier you start, the faster you get there. I’m 49 and wish I’d had this mentality at 29. Damnit. 

But it’s never too late to start taking better care of your future, your physical health, and your mental health. That’s where I’m at.  I’ll keep updating you. 

Item #1

This first one is called “The Effects of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment on Pain and Disability in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial” by Cholewicki et. al. (Cholewicki J 2021) and published in PM&R on October 31, 2021.

Aye chiwawa!

Why They Did It

Neck pain (NP) affects as much as 70% of individuals at some point in their lives. Systematic reviews indicate that manual treatments can be moderately effective in the management of chronic, nonspecific NP. However, there is a paucity of studies specifically evaluating the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). The authors wanted to evaluate the efficacy of OMT in reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic NP. And I’m glad they are because they’re right, there is a paucity of research on neck pain. Low back gets all the attention while neck pain…..treating neck pain is the main thing we chiros get beat up over. So why the hell not knock out a ton of high-level research on chiro, manipulation, and neck pain while continuing to highlight the low risk of adverse effects for its treatment? Can we finally get past this chiropractors cause strokes issue? Is there increased risk? Sure. But that doesn’t mean we go arounnd causing them. There are bad patients that shouldn’t be worked on and there are bad chiros that are far too rouugh. But for the most part, its not dangerous whatsoever.  Take the UFC for example

How They Did It

  • Single-blinded, cross-over, randomized controlled trial.
  • University-based, osteopathic manipulative medicine outpatient clinic.
  • 97 participants, 21-65 years old, with chronic, nonspecific NP
  • Participants were randomized to two trial arms: immediate OMT intervention or waiting period first. 
  • The intervention consisted of 3-4 OMT sessions over 4-6 weeks, after which the participants switched groups.
  • Primary outcome measures were pain intensity (average and current) on the numerical rating scale and Neck Disability Index.
  • 38 and 37 participants were available for the analysis in the OMT and waiting period groups, respectively

What They Found

  • The results showed significantly better primary outcomes in the immediate OMT group for reductions in average pain, current pain, disability, and improved secondary outcomes related to sleep, fatigue, and depression. 
  • No study-related serious adverse events were reported.

Wrap It Up

OMT is relatively safe and effective in reducing pain and disability along with improving sleep, fatigue, and depression in patients with chronic NP immediately following treatment delivered over approximately 4-6 weeks. One big thing here, this improvement was seen with 3-4 visits over 4-6 weeks. Shouldn’t that have been standardized and consistent from patient to patient? Like 4 visits over 6 weeks for example. Not a range. Next thing, this is about chronic pain. Is 3-4 visits over 4-6 weeks really enough to start addressing the issue of chronic pain? To introduce proprioception, movement, function, and all that good stuff?? No is the answer but, they still showed improvement. I’d love to see the outcomes in a design like this with a more robust and appropriate treatment schedule or frequency. 

Item #2 Thsi one is called “You don’t need expensive CBP BS protocols with biased research done by the stakeholders to entice the 9 out of 10 patients that naturally have a decreased cervical curvature into a 70 visit $5,000 treatment plan to fix a lack of cervical curve that a 20 year research project proved is no big deal anyway.  Oh wait….sorry….check that. The actual title is “Efficacy of Modified Cervical and Shoulder Retraction Exercise in Patients With Loss of Cervical Lordosis and Neck Pain” by Lee et. al. (Lee 2020) and published in Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine on May 29 2020 and it’s hot enough! Sorry for the mistake. I’ll try to pay more attention to the research paper titles. I’m undiagnosed ADD like that. I take the eye off the ball every here and there. I’ll try to tighten that up a bit. 

Anyway

Why They Did It

  • This research was done by medical doctors so there is no chiropractic bias to this lack of curvature research information. 
  • The authors say they wanted to explore if the modified cervical and shoulder retraction exercise program restores cervical lordosis and reduces neck pain in patients with loss of cervical lordosis.

How They Did It

  • This study was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. 
  • Eighty-three patients with loss of cervical lordosis were eligible. 
  • The eligible patients were trained to perform the modified cervical and shoulder retraction exercise program by a physiatrist, and were scheduled for a follow-up 6 to 8 weeks later to check the post-exercise pain intensity and lateral radiograph of the cervical spine in a comfortable position. 
  • The parameters of cervical alignment (4-line Cobb’s angle, posterior tangent method, and sagittal vertical axis) were measured from the lateral radiograph.
  • Forty-seven patients were included.
  • The mean age was 48.29±14.47 years

What They Found

  • Cervical alignment and neck pain significantly improved after undergoing the modified cervical and shoulder retraction exercise program. 
  • The upper cervical lordotic angle also significantly improved. 
  • In a subgroup analysis, which involved dividing the patients into two age groups (<50 years and ≥50 years), the change of the sagittal vertical axis was significantly greater in the <50 years group

Wrap It Up

The modified cervical and shoulder retraction exercise program tends to improve cervical lordosis and neck pain in patients with loss of cervical lordosis. So……if we’re evidence-based and patient-centered, we are not taking advantage of others. We don’t see patients as sales targets. We aren’t seeing them as targets to close on. We aren’t seeing them with dollar signs in our eyes.  Rather, we are seeing them as human beings that are in our clinic to place full faith, trust, body, mind, physical well-being, and their entire futures in our hands.

If we are honoring this idea and honoring our patients, we are teaching them about this, we are teaching them about moving, we are teaching them how to self-manage at home, and we are doing what we can within a responsible and appropriate 2-4 treatment plan….give or take.  You know…..being a doctor and doing doctor stuff instead of doing street corner huckster stuff like I see so many fellow chiropractors doing.  It’s sad. We don’t have to put up with it in our profession. We just have to stop ignoring it and start calling it out and not putting up with it. We can run this behavior out of our profession. If we choose to. Alright, that’s it. Keep on keepin’ on. Keep changing our profession from your corner of the world. The world needs evidence-based, patient-centered practitioners driving the bus.

The profession needs us in the ACA and involved in leadership of state associations. So quit griping about the profession if you’re doing nothing to make it better. Get active, get involved, and make it happen. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

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About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine (FIANM) and Board Certified Diplomate of the American Board of Forensic Professionals (DABFP) – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger  

Bibliography

Cholewicki J, P. J., Reeves NP, DeStefano L, (2021). “The Effects of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment on Pain and Disability in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial.”

PM R.   Lee, M., Jeon H, Choi J, Park Y, (2020). “Efficacy of Modified Cervical and Shoulder Retraction Exercise in Patients With Loss of Cervical Lordosis and Neck Pain.” ARM 44: 3.  

Primary Spinal Practitioner, Gabapentin, Cervical Curvature

CF 123: Primary Spinal Practitioner, Gabapentin, Cervical Curvature

Today we’re going to talk about the primary spinal practitioner program, research on gabapentin and its use in low back pain and radiculopathy, and we’ll talk about cervical curvature…what’s the research?

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our facebook page, 
  • Join our private facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. No spam, just a reminder when the newest episodes go live. Nothing special so don’t worry about signing up. Just one a week friends. Check your JUNK folder!!

Do it do it do it. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #123

Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about chiropractic primary prevention research, we talked about TENS use for migraines in the ER, and we talked about research for acupuncture with chronic pain. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

While we’re on the topic of being smart, did you know that you can use our website as a resource? Quick and easy, you can go to chiropracticforward.com, click on Episodes, and use the search function to find whatever you want quickly and easily. With over 100 episodes in the tank and an average of 2-3 papers covered per episode, we have somewhere between 250 and 300 papers that can be quickly referenced along with their talking points. 

Just so you know, all of the research we talk about in each episode is cited in the show notes for each episode if you’re looking to dive in a little deeper. 

On the personal end of things…..

Well another pandemic week in the books. I’m recording this on April the 29th, 2020 and it’s quite a mess still. We have states that are still climbing in cases dramatically but still opening up businesses. 

I’ve been telling people that I’m in the middle on this deal. We have to get out. We can’t stay in our cocoons and watch our businesses die. I was that way for a bit honestly. But we just can’t do that. At the same time, it’s not time to open wide and let ‘er rip either. We have to have a measured opening keeping a watch on the cases. 

The great news emerging is the number of asymptomatics they are identifying. It really does all come down to testing. You don’t know what you’re dealing with if you can’t tell who the heck has it. Wouldn’t it be amazing if we are blessed enough to be one of those asymptomatics that simply have no symptoms and no idea we even had the damn thing? 

The problem is that at least for now, we have to go about as if we are asymptomatic carriers basically. The last thing I’d ever want is to unknowingly give it to my 74-year-old mother or my 80-year-old stepdad. That’s not my idea of being a good person at all. Lol. 

I also have a dad in a nursing home and that’s been tough for sure. I know they do what they can to entertain them but they’re basically forced to keep all of the residents separated in case the bug is lurking about. So, they end up in their rooms most if not all of the day I think. 

We haven’t been allowed in to see him since middle March or so. Which is frustrating. He had a stroke so he’s not always all there and can be a bit confused about why people aren’t visiting. Getting him on the phone has been a challenge as well but we’re making due. 

It’s a tough time for everyone right now. But I’m a glass half-full guy. This too shall pass. We’re going to be OK. People are going to eventually get out and about. People are going to eventually start re-engaging in the economy. Until then, financial institutes and the government will continue to make accommodations for business owners. 

Keep the faith brothers and sisters. The general curve in our country right now is downward. I believe there’s light at the tunnel. Just stay smart and stay safe until we reach that light.  

Before we get started, I did a thing

I’ve always wanted to help others with their message and how they’re getting it out there. Keeping that in mind, during this lull in business due to the pandemic, I decided to try something different and invest my time instead of waste it. I’ve certainly had the time to invest as have most of us.

I did two episodes on marketing an evidence-based practice a few months ago and both of those episodes are among our most listened to, most popular episodes so I know there is value there and I know there’s an interest in the topic. 

Over the years, if I wanted to learn more about excel, I’d take a course over at udemy.com. If I wanted to learn more about marketing, udemy proved to be a valuable resource. If you’re not familiar with sites like Udemy or Teachable, you should go check it out. 

I haven’t really looked into what other chiropractors are using it for but I thought, if I wanted to offer a course, Udemy would be a good place to start. While I’m still building the course and adding content every week, it’s live and ready to go for those interested. If it’s not, it will be live in only a day or two. 

If you’re interested, I created, basically, my playbook for marketing and my thoughts on each topic or technique. I also have created downloads, checklists, and examples to show what my stuff looks like. 

https://www.udemy.com/course/marketing-evidence-based-chiropractic/?referralCode=36A4D91C66B48300360B

Just go to udemy.com and do a search on Marketing An Evidence Based Chiropractic Practice and check it out. See what you think. It’s my first online course to create so any feedback is appreciated. Over time, I’ll be updating the content and adding graphics, and things like that as I finish the initial bulk of the work and am able to revisit and re-work parts that could use it. Plus, I plan on responding to feedback and make any needed changes from there as well.

https://www.udemy.com/course/marketing-evidence-based-chiropractic/?referralCode=36A4D91C66B48300360B

Item #1

This one is not a research paper as much as it is an article. It is from way back in 2011 but is as relevant or more relevant than it’s ever been today. This one is called, “The establishment of a primary spine care practitioner and its benefits to health care reform in the United States” by Donald Murphy et al(Murphy D 2011) and published in Chiropractic and Manual Therapies journal. I have the citation in the show notes if you’d like to look deeper at this

Why They Did It

They highlight the issue with spine-related treatments, the costs, the lack of any real effectiveness to justify the rising costs and make the argument that a key answer to theses issues includes having a group of practitioners trained to function as primary care practitioners for the spine. 

Let’s hit some of the highlights here:

  • Spine-related disorders (SRDs) are among the most common, costly and disabling problems in Western society. For the purpose of this commentary, we define SRDs as the group of conditions that include back pain, neck pain, many types of headache, radiculopathy, and other symptoms directly related to the spine. Virtually 100% of the population is affected by this group of disorders at some time in life.
  • A variety of physicians and other providers have traditionally been involved with the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. This includes primary care physicians, chiropractic physicians, orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, physiatrists, osteopathic physicians, physical therapists, psychologists, massage therapists, kinesiologists, naprapaths and acupuncturists. This has resulted in what has been termed the “supermarket approach” to the management of SRDs [19]. That is, the SRD patient is faced with an environment in which there is a large number of practitioners, each offering a solution to SRDs, with the patient left to sort out which of these disparate approaches is best for his or her particular problem. Oftentimes this determination is based more on salesmanship and marketing than on science, clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness. Lawd don’t we know some surgeons and some chiropractors that are salesmen? And scare care tacticians?
  • Treatment for SRDs has become increasingly specialist-focused, imaging-oriented, invasive and expensive. 

  • One approach to health care reform would designate primary care physicians (PCPs) or groups of PCPs as “patient homes”, responsible for the comprehensive care and management of a designated patient population under a risk-sharing agreement
  • In their book Redefining Health Care [26], Porter and Teisberg state that for health care reform to be successful, it must incentivize competition based on value, i.e., outcome per dollar spent. To maximize value in health care, they recommend physicians and other health care providers organize themselves around conditions in which they have maximal expertise and experience (chronic kidney disease, diabetes, SRDs) rather than around medical specialties (orthopedics, internal medicine, neurology, etc.) and compete on the level of providing the best health outcomes for these conditions at the best possible cost (i.e., providing value). Ohhhh, that sounds fun because the Palmer/Gallup surveys show chiropractors get patients better for less money and patients are happier with chiropractors than PTs and GPs. I think the good chiropractors would fair particularly well in this scenario. 
  • We think that the health care system needs an appropriately trained and skilled clinician who can fill the role of a primary care provider for the diagnosis and non-surgical management of SRDs; a “primary care physician for the spine”.
  • The primary spine care practitioner will require a particular skill set that includes the ability to apply evidence-based procedures, appropriately educate and motivate patients and effectively prevent and manage disability related to SRDs. The benefits in terms of improved outcomes of care for SRDs, improved patient satisfaction, and reduced costs (i.e., the value of care for SRDs) would be well worth the effort of grooming practitioners toward filling this role.

Dr. Murphy and his crew have established the Primary Spine Practitioner Certification Program through the University of Pittsburgh. I’ve provided their link in the show notes. If I were 10 years younger, I’d probably do it now that I’ve completed the Ortho Diplomate.

https://www.psp.pitt.edu

Item #2

On to item #2 called “Anticonvulsants in the Treatment of Low Back Pain and Lumbar Radicular Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” by Enke et. al.(Enke O 2018) published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal in July 2018. 

Why They Did It

The use of anticonvulsants (e.g., gabapentin, pregabalin) to treat low back pain has increased substantially in recent years despite limited supporting evidence. We aimed to determine the efficacy and tolerability of anticonvulsants in the treatment of low back pain and lumbar radicular pain compared with placebo.

How They Did It

  • A search was conducted in 5 databases for studies comparing an anticonvulsant to placebo in patients with nonspecific low back pain, sciatica or neurogenic claudication of any duration.
  • The outcomes were self-reported pain, disability and adverse events.
  • Risk of bias was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale
  • Quality of evidence was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE)
  • Nine trials compared topiramate, gabapentin or pregabalin to placebo in 859 unique participants.

What They Found

  • Fourteen of 15 comparisons found anticonvulsants were not effective to reduce pain or disability in low back pain or lumbar radicular pain; 
  • For example, there was high-quality evidence of no effect of gabapentinoids versus placebo on chronic low back pain in the short term or for lumbar radicular pain in the immediate term
  • The lack of efficacy is accompanied by increased risk of adverse events from use of gabapentinoids, for which the level of evidence is high.

Wrap It Up

“There is moderate- to high-quality evidence that anticonvulsants are ineffective for treatment of low back pain or lumbar radicular pain. There is high-quality evidence that gabapentinoids have a higher risk for adverse events.”

Item #3

Our last one is called “Cervical lordosis in asymptomatic individuals: a meta-analysis” by Guo et. al(Guo G 2018). and published in the Journal of Orthopedic Surgery and Research in 2018. 

Why They Did It

Cervical lordosis has important clinical and surgical implications. Cervical spine curvature is reported with considerable variability in individual studies. The aim of this study was to examine the existence and extent of cervical lordosis in asymptomatic individuals and to evaluate its relationship with age and gender.

How They Did It

  • A comprehensive literature search was conducted in several electronic databases
  • Random effects meta-analyses were performed to estimate the proportion of asymptomatic individuals with lordosis and the effect size of cervical lordotic curvature in these individuals which followed metaregression analysis to examine the factors affecting cervical lordosis
  • Data from 21 studies were used in the study.
  • 15,364 asymptomatic individuals, age 42.30 years

What They Found

  • 64% individuals possessed lordotic curvature
  • Degree of lordotic curvature differed by method of measurement
  • Lordotic curvature was not significantly different between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals but was significantly higher in males in comparison with females
  • Age was not significantly associated with lordotic cervical curvature

Wrap It Up

Majority of the asymptomatic individuals possesses lordotic cervical curvature which is higher in males than in females but have no relationship with age or symptoms.

There are a lot more papers out there on cervical curves and the meaning and impact of hypolordosis. Here’s the deal, I’m standing strong that hypolordosis is minimally impactful and is not anywhere near important enough to to sell $6,000, 70 visit annual plans to correct it. 

It’s just not. And I don’t care what the owner of a curvature correction system says about it or what biased BS research they try their best to pump out there. It’s Just NOT. 

It’s a hell of a marketing scare tactic and it’ll put money in your pockets but it won’t give you respect and it might even keep you up at night if you allow your conscience to have a seat at the table.

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Continue taking care of yourselves and taking care of your neighbors. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, belive it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Key Takeaways

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com

Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

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Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

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Twitter

YouTube

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Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

Enke O (2018). “Anticonvulsants in the treatment of low back pain and lumbar radicular pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.” CMAJ(190): E786-793.

Guo G, L. J., Diao Q, (2018). “Cervical lordosis in asymptomatic individuals: a meta-analysis.” J Orthop Surg Res 13(147).

Murphy D, J. B., Paskowski I, Perle S, Schneider M, (2011). “The establishment of a primary spine care practitioner and its benefits to health care reform in the United States.” Chiropr Man Therap 17.