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CF 013: DEBUNKED: The Odd Myth That Chiropractors Cause Strokes (Part 1 of 3)

This week, we are going to start tackling the chiropractors cause strokes myth that has run rampant for years and I hope to once and for all dispel it. The information could not be clearer on the chiropractors cause strokes myth and we’re gonna to show it to you in a way that you can understand and in a way that allows you to show it to others. I’m done with this myth, folks!

Before we get started, I want to draw your attention to the reviews over at iTunes. If you would be kind enough to leave us a great review we sure would appreciate you! This is a new podcast and we need all the help we can get!

Right now though, it’s time for bumper music!

Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast where we talk about issues related to health, chiropractic, evidence, chiropractic advocacy, and research. Thank you for taking time out of your day I know your time is valuable and I want to fill it with value so here we go.

Unfortunately, you have often read, watched, or heard me complaining about how our profession has been historically attacked by those organizations in charge of the medical profession. I hope those paying attention understand it is not just sour grapes.

It is education.

I continually bring these facts up in my articles, videos, and podcast because many of the things we talk about have their roots in our history, in the attacks our profession has sustained, and in the attacks our profession is currently battling.

From the start, let me state that research simply does NOT support the chiropractors cause strokes myth.

If you have seen the TV series called “Mythbusters,” then you know the smart red-headed guy and the bald bespectacled serious guy both, along with their rascally cohorts, took a common myth and tested its validity.

Some of the myths were outrageous and some seemed like they may actually be plausible. The show, whenever I watched it was highly entertaining and extremely educational. The entertaining part always came toward the end of the show when they would blow something to smithereens. That’s the part where the inner child in me would leap with glee. Internally of course, not externally.

This mythbusting process has already been carried out for the chiropractors cause strokes myth. Several times, in fact. Without the show-ending explosion of course. Although, at the end of this Mythbusting series, I may walk away with a mic drop if you’re all OK with that.

I say mythbusting series because there is SO MUCH information here that I have to split it into 3 different episodes for the chiropractors cause strokes podcast series. I’m pumping my own tires and I am completely full of myself on what I’m about to say here and I’m well-aware of the fact but, from what I have seen out there on the interwebs, I feel like this is, or at least CAN be, the definitive article, the definitive podcast, the definitive gathering of the information for this topic. If that is indeed the lofty goal I’m aiming for, it has to be comprehensive and somewhat exhaustive and I don’t think I can maintain your focus and interest for the entire amount of the information to be compiled into one super long episode. Dispelling the chiropractors cause strokes myth is too important to lose your attention.

I have split it into three episodes that will break up like this

The first episode, the one you’re currently listening to will include some risky odds, some case specific discussion, some signs and symptoms of vertebral artery dissection, and some research dealing with common treatments within the medical profession.

In the second episode coming next Thursday we will discuss research papers demonstrating and validating benefits of having cervical manipulation treatments. Or chiropractic adjustments to the neck. We will talk about the benefits, according to research, for neck pain as well as for headaches. And we’ll also talk a little about where this chiropractors cause strokes myth came from and why it perpetuates to this day.

In the third and final episode we will discuss risky interventions, papers having to do with the risk, or lack thereof, of chiropractic adjustments to the cervical region specifically, and then a wrap up of the information on this chiropractors cause strokes myth.

Stick with us on this.

Now, let’s dive into this first episode of the chiropractors cause stroke series.

Through the RAND institute, it is estimated that a serious, adverse reaction (such as stroke as a result to a chiropractic adjustment alone) happens in approximately 1 out of every 1 million treatments?

Let’s put that finding into perspective by comparing it to some other odds.

  • The odds of being struck and killed by lightning is 1 in 174,426 according to the National Safety Council.
  • The odds of being told to “Come on down,” on The Price Is Right is 1 in 36!
  • The odds of being born with 11 fingers or toes is 1 in 500.
  • The odds of dying from a firearms assault is 1 in 113.
  • How about this one: the odds of winning an Oscars are 1 in 11,500.

I think it’s time to move to LA!

Consider that there are 70,000+ chiropractors in the United States of America. If Doctors of Chiropractic were out in the world causing strokes “all of the time,” it would be apparent, it would be obvious, and our malpractice insurance would reflect the fact that a visit to the chiropractor comes with a considerable amount of risk. To the contrary, we chiropractors have malpractice insurance that costs chiropractors approximately 1/10th of what it costs our medical counterparts. This fact alone should dispel the chiropractors cause strokes myth.

Before we start diving off into the research too deeply, I want to talk about a case that happened within the last couple of years (February 2016) that brought the “Chiropractors Cause Strokes” myth back to the forefront. It had to do with the “Queen of Snapchat” Katie May. Katie died of a stroke at the age of 34 and, by many, it was immediately assumed the stroke was caused by her two visits to a chiropractor to treat her recent onset of neck pain.

I actually wrote about this case shortly after it originally happened. Initial reports stated that she had a horrible fall while on the set of a photoshoot, which resulted in her neck pain. Then, for some reason, this fact seemed to disappear from further reports.

Also, initial reports stated that Katie visited either the ER or a medical professional prior to her visits with a chiropractor. The family later denies this so, admittedly, there is some confusion on the matter. With this information brought back into the reporting, let’s begin breaking it all down.

Katie posted this message to Twitter: “Pinched a nerve in my neck on a photoshoot and got adjusted this morning. It really hurts! Any home remedy suggestions loves? XOXO.”

Keep that in mind as we run through things that can cause a vertebral artery dissection such as Katie May suffered. They are as follows:

  • Physical Trauma (direct blow to the neck, traffic collision, etc.)
  • Strangulation
  • Spontaneous (from underlying connective tissue disorder)

According to one paper by Debette et. al., “Trauma has been reported to have occurred within a month of dissection in 40% with nearly 90% of this time the trauma being minor[1]. “

Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) can be particularly difficult to diagnose without the use of a CT Angiogram. For instance, some common symptoms of VAD are as follows:

  • Pain and/or numbness in the same side of the face.
  • Head pain/Headache that develops gradually and can be dull or throbbing
  • In less than 1/5th of the cases of VAD, people suffer difficulty speaking or swallowing.
  • Possible unsteadiness or lack of coordination
  • Visual abnormalities
  • Hiccups
  • Nausea/Vomiting
  • Hearing loss

When one reads this list, it is easy to diagnose a VAD, right?

It rarely presents with these classic signs.

Is a medical professional or chiropractor going to refer every single one of these patients for a CT Angiogram or an MRI? Not very likely. It is simply not economically feasible to do so and good luck getting insurance companies to cover the costs of the CT Angiograms!

If Katie did indeed visit a medical professional after her fall, they missed it. Unfortunately, it seems obvious that the chiropractor missed it as well. That does not, however, mean the two professionals are inept. As the website for emedicine.com states, “The focal signs may not appear until after a latent period lasting as long as three days, however, and delays of weeks and years also have been reported[2].”

With that being said, I don’t want to be completely biased here. If a healthy person shows up with a headache and neck pain BUT has a history of recent trauma, more exploration is advised, without question. Knowing this, I can relay countless stories of medical doctors having made bad decisions as well. I have heard countless stories throughout my twenty years of practice. Ultimately, we are all human which is why chiropractors and medical doctors both carry malpractice insurance. But, as I mentioned before, chiropractors’ malpractice is approximately 1/10th that of their medical counterparts because, basically, we do not typically cause any harms in our patients.

As we go through more and more papers, it should be clear that Katie likely suffered the VAD as a result of the fall during the photo shoot and the VAD was missed by the medical professionals (if she did indeed go) and then certainly missed by the chiropractor BUT, the chiropractor almost certainly did not CAUSE the VAD. There’s no we he helped it and could have even potentially exacerbated it, but it is highly doubtful and exceedingly rare that he could have been the CAUSE of it.

Some time later, the Los Angeles coroner reported that the chiropractor was responsible for Katie’s death. This finding really opened the door to all of the chiropractic haters to bash away at the profession.

The LA coroner’s office is an appointed position that, in some states, requires little training, to be quite honest. While I am unaware of this particular coroner’s level of training and expertise, this coroner has been under scrutiny for being understaffed and underfunded to mention just a couple of issues. In addition, I would argue that simply because a man or a woman is a county coroner, does not mean they are above being affected by bias or by their profession’s long-held beliefs and teachings. I would say they most certainly are not above influence and, in my opinion, are highly likely to be affected by them. When they are told by their schools, their national and state associations, and their mentors that chiropractors cause strokes, don’t you think they probably believe it?

I would also argue that the coroner likely has little to zero knowledge of the current body of research regarding cervical manipulation and the instance of stroke. How could an educated person aware of the body of literature on the matter decide otherwise?

For years, I have experienced nurses, physician assistants, medical doctors, and others in an online setting claiming that chiropractic adjustments are dangerous and ineffective. A common theme amongst them is, “It happens all of the time.” We see it “all of the time.” Research proves the notion is a lie.

I would like to be less dramatic or inflammatory in my wording but I do not know of another way to describe it.

Let’s assume that this myth has its base rooted in some sort of fact. Let us be clear. It does not. But, for argument sake, let us say that it does. At that point, we would need to assess the benefits of chiropractic treatment vs. the risks of chiropractic treatment.

In Southern terms, “Is the squeeze worth the push?”

Is there a return on the investment?

Again, this is purely for argument sake because the chiropractors cause strokes myth is not real to start with but playing the devil’s advocate can be of use and is almost always entertaining.

Before we step into deeper water with the research papers, let us discuss benefits & effectiveness vs. risk for some common treatments for spinal complaints in the medical world. If the discussion is focused on doing away with cervical adjustments, what then would be the alternatives and how effective are they? Basically, if the medical field is looking in OUR backyard, maybe we should take a peek into theirs as well.

Keep in mind that all of the research we discuss will be cited in the show notes so that those of you that wish can easily research these independently on your own.

  • The opioid crisis cost the US economy $504 billion dollars in 2015 and a total of $221 billion to $431 billion in lost economic output due to there being 33,000 opioid-related deaths in 2015[3].
  • There were 63,600 opioid-related deaths in 2016, which was an increase of 21% from the 2015.[4].
  • Chou R, et. al. – Although the steroid injections for radiculopathy showed some short-term relief in pain and short-term increase in function, the benefits seen in the patients were only small and short-term only. There was no effect long-term and no affect on whether or not the person had surgery eventually. The evidence in this paper suggested there was no effectiveness at all for the treatment of spinal stenosis[5].
  • Epstein N, et. al. – “Although not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), injections are being performed with an increased frequency (160%), are typically short-acting and ineffectiveover the longer-term, while exposing patients to major risks/complications[6].”
  • Peterson CK, et. al. – “Subacute/chronic patients treated with SMT (spinal manipulative therapy) were significantly more likely to report relevant “improvement” compared with CNRI (CERVICAL NERVE ROOT INJECTION) patients.There was no difference in outcomes when comparing acute patients only[7].”
  • Chou R, et. al. – “Epidural corticosteroid injections for radiculopathy were associated with immediate improvements in pain and might be associated with immediate improvements in function, but benefits were small and not sustained, and there was no effect on long-term risk of surgery. Evidence did not suggest that effectiveness varies based on injection technique, corticosteroid, dose, or comparator. Limited evidence suggested that epidural corticosteroid injections are not effective for spinal stenosis or nonradicular back pain and that facet joint corticosteroid injections are not effective for presumed facet joint pain[5].”
  • Chou R, et. al – “Surgery for radiculopathy with herniated lumbar disc and symptomatic spinal stenosis is associated with short-term benefits compared to nonsurgical therapy, though benefits diminish with long-term follow-up in some trials. For nonradicular back pain with common degenerative changes, fusion is no more effective than intensive rehabilitation, but associated with small to moderate benefits compared to standard nonsurgical therapy[8].”
  • Maghout J, et. al. – “Use of intervertebral fusion devices rose rapidly after their introduction in 1996. This increased use was associated with an increased complication risk without improving disability or reoperation rates[9].”

 

At this point, it is clear the medical field has its own issues to concentrate on and improve upon when it comes to spinal pain and the treatment of it. It is my opinion these facts are but only a few of the concerns in the medical field and, if taken individually, are much more concerning than any one single issue that can be found within the chiropractic profession.

This is where we are going to stop for this first episode of the Chiropractors cause strokes series. Remember, our” chiropractors cause strokes” series is a three part series.

Be sure to tune in next week for the second part of the three part series. Next week, we will be talking about the benefits, according to research, for neck pain as well as for headaches. And we’ll also talk a little about where this myth came from and why it perpetuates to this day.

You may also consider listening to a recent episode in which we covered some great new research on treating neck pain conservatively through chiropractic care. Check it out at https://www.chiropracticforward.com/2018/03/08/proven-means-to-treat-neck-pain/

­­­­­­­­Please feel free to send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think about the chiropractors cause strokes myth or what suggestions you may have for us for future episodes.

If you love what you hear, be sure to check out www.chiropracticforward.com. As this podcast builds, so will the website with more content, products, and chances to learn.

We cannot wait to connect again with you next week. From Creek Stone, my office here in Amarillo, TX, home of the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

 

References

  1. Debette S, “Pathophysiology and risk factors of cervical artery dissection: what have we learnt from large hospital-based cohorts?”. . Current Opinion in Neurology, 2014. 27(1): p. 20-8.
  2. Lang E. Vertebral Artery Dissection. Emergency Medicine 2017 January 18]; Available from: https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/761451-overview.
  3. Mutikani L. Opioid crisis cost U.S. economy $504 billion in 2015: White House. 2017; Available from: https://www.reuters.com/article/legal-us-usa-opioids-cost/opioid-crisis-cost-u-s-economy-504-billion-in-2015-white-house-idUSKBN1DL2Q0.
  4. Glenza J. Life expectancy in US down for second year in a row as opioid crisis deepens. 2017 December 21; Available from: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/dec/21/us-life-expectancy-down-for-second-year-in-a-row-amid-opioid-crisis.
  5. Chou R, Epidural Corticosteroid Injections for Radiculopathy and Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Ann Intern Med, 2015. 163(5): p. 373-81.
  6. Epstein N, The risks of epidural and transforaminal steroid injections in the Spine: Commentary and a comprehensive review of the literature. Surg Neurol Int, 2013. 4(Suppl 2): p. S74-93.
  7. Peterson CK, Symptomatic, Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Confirmed Cervical Disk Herniation Patients: A Comparative-Effectiveness Prospective Observational Study of 2 Age- and Sex-Matched Cohorts Treated With Either Imaging-Guided Indirect Cervical Nerve Root Injections or Spinal Manipulative Therapy. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2016. 39(3): p. 210-7.
  8. Chou R, Surgery for low back pain: a review of the evidence for an American Pain Society Clinical Practice Guideline. Spine, 2009. 34(10): p. 1094-109.
  9. Maghout J, e.e., Lumbar fusion outcomes in Washington State workers’ compensation. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2006. 31(23): p. 2715-23.

CF 012: Proven Means To Treat Neck Pain

Proven Means To Treat Neck Pain

In today’s podcast, we are going to talk about research on how to treat neck pain but hopefully in a fun way. We like to have fun on the Chiropractic Forward podcast. Let’s face it, research can be a bit boring so why not try to have some fun with it?

Before we get started, I want to draw your attention to the reviews over at iTunes. If you would be kind enough to leave us a great review, that tells iTunes that people are finding value in what we are sharing and it will help us grow this podcast. We sure would appreciate you!

Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast where we talk about issues related to health, chiropractic, evidence, and research and how those things all fit into a comprehensive approach for treating different conditions. Thank you for taking time out of your day to give us a listen. I know your time is valuable and I will always try hard to fill our time with valuable content.

In the words of Chris Berman, you have back back back backed into Episode #12 and this week we’re going to have more fun than having your teenage son spank you in video games that you’ve always beat him at. Yes, this recently happened to yours truly. Not only that but he did it with a pistol and I’m asham   ed. Call of Duty was my safe space y’all…..

So, I’ll just bury myself into my work, stuff it deep down inside to explode at a later date.

Now, If you have spent any significant amount of time with our videos, podcasts, or blogs, you are probably aware that there is an excess of research regarding chiropractic’s effectiveness in patients suffering from low back pain.

Although there are some excellent research papers having to do with chiropractic and neck pain, I would argue that it demands more attention. Without question. The first reason being that neck pain is as important or more so than low back pain. In the paper we will be discussing this week, they cite research suggesting that neck pain is responsible for up to 25% of the patients seen in outpatient orthopedic practices and 50% of the general population will have neck pain at some point in their lives.

The second reason I believe neck pain demands more attention from our industry is that we have been unfairly labeled as the profession out there in the world causing strokes every day. There needs to be a clear, factual representation of the risk vs. reward ratio and, if there is a small body of evidence, our case doesn’t stand up quite as strongly.

To be more clear, there is an abundance of evidence that Chiropractic is not linked to strokes any more than going to the primary practitioner. However, there is scant evidence of Chiropractic’s effectiveness to treat neck pain WHEM COMPRAED to the research available to treat low back pain.

This does not mean there isn’t great research in our favor on hwo to treat neck pain. That is not what I’m saying at all. It just means we have not documented it through research in the amounts that we have for the low back pain and I would like to see more. If I were a researcher myself, it is the condition I would be targeting without question.

Now, with that being said, this week’s paper is titled “The Immediate Effects of Upper Thoracic Translatoric Spinal Manipulation on Cervical Pain and Range of Motion: A Randomized Clinical Trial” published in the Journal of Manual Manipulative Therapeutics in 2008 that shows the effectiveness of spinal manipulative therapy. Here’s the catch, it was performed by physical therapists, not chiropractors. It was done by John Krauss, PT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT, et. al. Look at all of those letters.

At this point, I would like to diverge from the original path for a few moments. If chiropractors are unaware, along with research validating the chiropractic adjustment to treat neck pain, low back pain, and other maladies comes more competition for the service.

Physical therapists were restricted to muscles and exercise essentially. Now, they are adjusting. This is going to become a turf war between chiropractors doing what we have always done and physical therapists adopting our treatments as their own.

Of course, physical therapists can’t call what they do “chiropractic adjustments” so they have changed the term to “translatoric spinal manipulation.”

It’s irritating to the chiropractic profession but it is a fact the profession will be facing more and more in the years to come so be prepared for it.

It is particularly irritating when you consider that physical therapists have been part of the medical machine that have torn down the chiropractic profession for generations prior to adopting its techniques as their own.

Now, back to the research paper.

Why They Did It

The authors of the paper wanted to determine the effectiveness of thoracic (upper back) adjustments to treat neck pain and neck range of motion.

How They Did It

  • The active range of motion of the neck in each subject was measured before and after the manipulation. The term “active range of motion” means the patient turned their neck as far as possible in rotation both ways without the assistance of the researcher.
  • The range of motion was measured with a cervical inclinometer.
  • The patient’s neck pain was measured prior to and after treatment with the Faces Pain Scale. A quick trip to Wikipedia tells us that the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale is a pain scale that was developed by Donna Wong and Connie Baker. The scale shows a series of faces ranging from a happy face at 0 which represents “no hurt” to a crying face at 10 which represents “hurts worst.”
  • The study included 32 patients having pain in the cervical region and limited range of motion.
  • 22 of these were randomly split into an experimental group while the other ten were randomly placed into a control group.
  • The evaluator measuring the pre- and post-manipulation outcomes was a blinded evaluator to reduce risk of bias.
  • The experimental (treatment) group received the manipulation treatment to the areas of the upper back region that had been determined to be hypomobile. In simpler terms, they delivered the adjustment to the areas of the upper back that were stiff or not moving like they should.
  • The control group had no treatment.
  • Paired t-tests were used to determine the changes within the group for cervical rotation and pain. A paired t-test is used to compare two population means where you have two samples in which observations in one sample can be paired with observations in the other sample.
  • A 2-way repeated-measure ANOVA was used to analyze between-group differences in cervical rotation and pain. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA is often used in studies where you have measured a dependent variable over two or more time points, or when subjects have undergone two or more conditions. The primary purpose of a two-way repeated measures ANOVA is to understand if there is an interaction between these two factors on the dependent variable.

What They Found

  • Significant changes were found for neck rotation within the group as well as between the groups.
  • The translatoric spinal manipulative group showed more range of motion in right rotation as well as in left rotation.
  • The levels of pain the subjects experienced after the manipulation were significantly reduced.

Wrap It Up

The authors of the paper concluded by saying, “This study supports the hypothesis that spinal manipulation applied to the upper thoracic spine (T1-T4 motion segments) significantly increases cervical rotation ROM and may reduce cervical pain at end range rotation for patients experiencing pain during bilateral cervical rotation.”

Did you know that research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, compared to the traditional medical model, patients get good to excellent results with Chiropractic. It’s safe, more cost-effective, decreases chances of surgery, and reduces chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically with minimal time requirements and hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health! What better way to treat neck pain?

Please feel free to send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think or what suggestions you may have for us for future episodes. If you love what you hear, be sure to check out www.chiropracticforward.com.

As this podcast builds, so will the website as we add more content, educational products, and a little further down the road, webinars, seminars, and speaking dates as they get added.

We cannot wait to connect again with you next week. From Creek Stone here in Amarillo, TX, home of the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Source Material

Krauss J, et. al., “The Immediate Effects of Upper Thoracic Translatoric Spinal Manipulation on Cervical Pain and Range of Motion: A Randomized Clinical Trial.” J Man Manip Ther. 2008; 16(2): 93–99.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2565124/

CF 011: With Dr. Tyce Hergert: It’s Here. New Guides For Low Back Pain That Medical Doctors Are Ignoring

This week, we are talking about acute and non-acute low back pain. What are current healthcare guidelines? Why does it matter to chiropractic patients and non-chiropractic patients and are those in the medical field getting (and implementing) the information?

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast where we talk about issues related to health, chiropractic, evidence, and research and how those things all fit into a comprehensive approach for treating different conditions. Thank you for taking time out of your day to give us a listen. I know your time is valuable and I will always try hard to fill our time with valuable content.

We’re going to have more fun this week than stepping on a nail. Which I have done.

Before we dive in, it was so nice we had to do it twice. What am I talking about? I’m talking about bringing on Tyce. Tyce Hergert that is down in Southlake, TX. Owner and operator of Chiropractic Care Center of Southlake as well as Southlake Physical Medicine where he oversees an integrated practice. Dr. Hergert is also the immediate former President of the Texas Chiropractic Association so now he can say what he really thinks. He was the big cheese, the illustrious potentate of chiropractic in Texas.

Although it’s highly unlikely, should you enjoy what Tyce shares with us here today, go and listen to his other guest spot which can be found in Episode #6. You can find episode #6 at the following link:

CF 006: With Dr. Tyce Hergert: Astounding Expert Information On Immediate Headache Relief

Welcome to the show Tyce. Nice to have you back.

I would say that a chiropractor would be completely oblivious to not understand that Chiropractic is considered to be on the fringe of healthcare by many to most in the medical field. It’s just a fact and chiropractors deal with this daily. We Chiropractors are used to feeling like the black sheep of the healthcare family off in a corner keeping all to ourselves.

In other articles, podcasts, and videos of mine, you’ll notice I have covered the Wilk vs. AMA case. I’ve covered the Doctored film by Jeff Hayes spotlighting mistreatment of chiropractors. I’ve also covered current attacks on Texas Chiropractors by the Texas Medical Association. It is all very well-documented at this point.

Chiropractic is currently undergoing an amazing renaissance. This is due to a couple of key factors. The first being the need to develop non-pharmacological treatment recommendations in the midst of a national opioid addiction crisis. A crisis that has killed thousands and thousands in the last several years. The second reason being the body of high-quality research that is consistently coming to light almost every month showing the effectiveness of Chiropractic and evidence-based chiropractors.

Do you feel this renaissance, Tyce, or is it just me living inside my head?

With all of the new information and new healthcare laws emerging, the questions going forward SHOULD be, “Is the medical field and is the insurance industry listening and implementing?” We shall see. So far, the answer is, “Absolutely not.” In fact, it’s almost defiant.

Is that an accurate statement Tyce? You’re my checks and balance guy on everything.

Let’s begin with the most glaring denial of Federal Law by the insurance companies right now. It has to do with Section 2706 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Also commonly known as “Obamacare.” Section 2706 of the PPACA is entitled the nondiscrimination In Health Care section of the Federal Law and is intended to keep insurance companies and health plans from keeping chiropractors and the services they provide out of the system.

It reads as follows, “A group health plan and a health insurance issuer offering group or individual health insurance coverage shall not discriminate with respect to participation under the plan or coverage against any health care provider who is acting within the scope of that provider’s license or certification under applicable State law. This section shall not require that a group health plan or health insurance issuer contract with any health care provider willing to abide by the terms and conditions for participation established by the plan or issuer. Nothing in this section shall be construed as preventing a group health plan, a health insurance issuer, or the Secretary from establishing varying reimbursement rates based on quality or performance measures.”

On the American Chiropractic Association’s FAQ site for 2706, they state, “It is important to understand that Section 2706 and its assurance of non-discrimination in terms of participation and coverage requires that doctors of chiropractic not be discriminated against in the provision of any “essential benefit” that is within their scope of practice.”

Here’s the rub on 2706: part of its purpose is to reimburse chiropractors performing the same services under their scope and license at the same level financially as any other profession that provides that service.

For instance, under the PPACA Section 2706 Federal Law, chiropractors are to be paid the exact same for an 99203 exam code as a doctor of medicine or osteopathy is paid.

Would you agree with that assessment Dr. Hergert? Is this your understanding of the law?

Plain and simple. This is not happening. With so many chiropractors now integrating their practices with medical directors, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and physical therapists like Dr. Hergert has in Southlake, it’s painfully clear that doctors of chiropractic are being discriminated against when it comes to reimbursements for the same codes performed.

In fact, chiropractors are integrating with these other professions just so that they can finally GET the reimbursements that the other practitioners are allowed! It is madness and clearly violates Section 2706 of PPACA.

Dr. Hergert, you are a great resource here since you’re in the middle of the two professions. What is your experience on this?

Tyce: The carriers will come right out and tell you they don’t think they have to play by this rule.

Also, there is violation of the law if an insurer does something such as applying caps on specific services provided by one healthcare provider whereas the cap does not apply to another type of provider. It is my understanding that United Healthcare has moved to a $65 visit cap on chiropractic care here in Texas.

Am I misinformed here Tyce? Does United Healthcare only put caps on Chiropractors or are they capping services with all providers?
Tyce: That gets very frustrating for those patients with a $50-70 copay.

It is the American Chiropractic Association’s opinion that a violation exists if the insurer or plan denies specific forms of care that is otherwise covered if it is a chiropractor providing the service and it is within their scope and licensing. I would suggest that a medical doctor probably gets services such as non-surgical decompression covered under insurance but chiropractors are routinely denied coverage.

Are there any better examples of this disparity, Tyce, since I don’t know any medical doctors that have their patients perform decompression?

There is a possible violation of Federal Law when Chiropractors are denied inclusion into a plan or group purely based on the profession. For example, it is my understanding that FirstCare won’t cover Chiropractic. Is that a violation of 2706?

Is that a violation? I suppose I could offer an opinion if I were a lawyer. I’m not sure why exactly other providers are allowed coverage while chiropractors are left out in the cold. Here is a great example though that I’m aware of here locally. there is a local insurance network that will remained un-named that charges $200 per year for chiropractors to be included for coverage however, medical professionals pay nothing to be included. Could that be a violation of the nondiscrimination law? I would say it smells a little fishy.

In my opinion, Federal Law is being violated all over the place in regards to Section 2706 of PPACA. I’m not sure how it can be perceived any other way.

What can you add here Tyce that I may have left out?
Tyce: What this means for patients is you can’t use that shiny new insurance policy that is costing you more than a $250k house payment would. You have to fork over the more money to pay for your chiropractic care.

Moving on from Section 2706…..I love talking about the New Recommendations For Acute and Chronic Low Back Pain.
It is becoming more and more aggravating that we chiropractors are not seeing a flood of acute and chronic low back pain patients. If you read my articles, watch my videos, or listen to my podcast with any regularity, you have no doubt been informed several times over of these new recommendations which, at this point aren’t that new anymore. They have been around for about a year now.

It is my opinion that no long-held beliefs or protocols will change if new information isn’t continually pounded and yelled about from the top of the roofs with megaphones. In marketing, experts have said that it takes a target 7 times of being exposed to information before it is finally received and, hopefully, acted upon.

I know that the medical field has NOT been exposed to this information at least 7 times because of two factors:
1. I have spoken to several medical practitioners here locally and not a single one of them has heard of or were aware of these new recommendations.
2. I am not seeing an incredible, overwhelming influx of acute and chronic low back pain new patients coming through my doors as a result of medical referrals.

Tyce, are you seeing an incredible influx of new low back patients from the medical field these days?

Is this willful disregard for the changing recommendations and a “clinging on” to old dogmatic beliefs passed down from the AMA years ago? I think some of it most certainly is.

Is it that a few bad seeds in the Chiropractic profession are giving the rest of us a bad image? I would say some of it most certainly is.

What I think it is mostly based on, however, is the fact that medical professionals are busy, they’re stressed, and many times over-worked and they simply don’t always have the time or opportunity to stay completely up on every new recommendation or updated protocol.

What do you think about it, Tyce?
Tyce: “You’re not down with, what you’re not up on.” Most don’t know. They didn’t get this info in school, and the pharma reps aren’t out spreading the good news.

With that being said, let’s be clear; the issues of low back pain, its economic impact, and the national opioid epidemic crisis in America combine to make these new recommendations that much more important.

Let’s start with the American College of Physicians. Remember, the American College of Physicians was proven in the Wilk vs. AMA case to have played a part in collaborating with the AMA in an attempt to rid the Earth of Chiropractic. I think that’s important to note as we go through the information because the ACP is historically known as a detractor or the chiropractic profession to put it mildly.

In response to the opioid epidemic gripping the nation currently, the American College of Physicians developed new recommendations for treating acute and chronic low back pain.

Why They Did It
• The American College of Physicians developed this guideline in order to provide updated recommendations on treatment of low back pain.
• With these recommendations, the ACP hoped to influence clinicians AND patients to make the correct decision for care in acute, subacute, or chronic low back pain conditions.

How They Did It
• They based their recommendations on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and other systematic reviews.
• The research they reviewed included those papers available through April of 2015.
• The research included only those on noninvasive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments.

What They Found
• Recommendation #1: patients with subacute or acute low back pain should seek nonpharmacologic treatments such as Chiropractic, Massage, Acupuncture, and superficial heat BEFORE resorting to non-steroidal anti-inflammatories such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Aleve, etc… (Graded as a strong recommendation)
• Recommendation #2: patients with chronic low back pain should seek nonpharmacologic treatments such as Chiropractic, Exercise/Rehabilitation, Acupuncture, & Cold Laser Therapy BEFORE resorting to non-steroidal anti-inflammatories such as Ibuprofen, Tylenol, Aleve, etc… (Graded as a strong recommendation)
• Recommendation #3: In patients with chronic low back pain that have had no relief from nonpharmacological means, the first line of treatment would consist of NSAIDs like Aleve, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, etc.. As a second-line treatment, the clinician may consider tramadol or duloxetine. Opioids would be a last option and only if all other treatments have been exhausted and failed and even then with lengthy discussion with the patient in regards to the risks and benefits of using opioids. (Graded as weak recommendation)

Let’s recap: in February of 2017, the American College of Physicians, historically a Chiropractic profession detractor and attacker, now recommends Chiropractic as a first-line treatment for acute and chronic low back pain.

Dr. Hergert, does that make you feel warm and fuzzy inside because it does me?

Next, let us discuss the American Medical Association. If you thought the American College of Physicians was guilty of Chiropractic-hating, the American Medical Association is, or was, “Pablo Escobar” or the “El Chapo” of the attacks on the Chiropractic profession. The “El Jefe” of the Chiropractic haters, and the group that not only sat in the driver’s seat but also OWNED the entire truck of destruction back before Wilk vs. AMA came along. I believe I have been watching too much Netflix.

As a side note, I have realized that I have a wife, a daughter, and an all female staff at my office and…..I’m not the El Chapo or El Jefe of really anything. My son and I just walk around following orders pretty much. Tyce, you’re married with two daughters right?

On April 11, 2017, the Journal of the American Medical Association published a study on their website titled “Association of Spinal Manipulative Therapy With Clinical Benefit and Harm for Acute Low Back Pain Systematic Review and Meta-analysis,” authored by Neil Page, MD et. al. In the format of this research paper, they refer to chiropractic treatment as spinal manipulative treatment or SMT. But, because spinal manipulative therapy is what we chiropractors do the most and what we are most identified with, I’m replacing the term “SMT” with “chiropractic adjustment.”

Is that fair, Tyce? I think it’s fair.

Why They Did It
Considering that spinal manipulation, or the chiropractic adjustment, is a treatment option for acute low back pain, and that acute low back pain is one of the most common reasons for visits to the doctor’s office, the authors wanted to systematically review the studies that have been done in the past dealing with the effectiveness as well as the harms of chiropractic adjustments in the treatment of acute low back pain.

How They Did It
• The researchers used searches of MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, and Current Nursing and Allied Health Literature.
• The search spanned 6 years from January 2011 through February 2017 for randomized controlled trials of adults with low back pain comparing spinal manipulative therapy with no treatment or with alternative treatments.
• The accepted papers also had to measure pain or functional outcomes for up to 6 weeks.
• The data extraction was done in duplicate.
• The quality of the study was assessed through use of the Cochrane Back and Neck Risk of Bias tool.
• Finally, the evidence was assessed using the GRADE criteria which stands for Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation.
• 26 eligible randomized controlled trials were identified and accepted

What They Found
• 15 of the RCTs, totaling 1699 patients, showed moderate-quality evidence that chiropractic adjustments had a statistically significant association with improvements in PAIN.
• 12 of the RCTs, totaling 1381 patients, showed moderate-quality evidence that chiropractic adjustments have a statistically significant association with improvements in FUNCTION.
• NO RCTs reported any serious harms or adverse event as a result of undergoing chiropractic adjustments.
• There were only minor events reported like some increased pain, muscle stiffness, and headache in roughly 50%-67% of those treated in the large case series. I would be interested to hear more about this statement by the authors. That is not what we commonly see in our practice. Sometimes, if the patient is new and is not accustomed to chiropractic adjustments, they may experience some soreness or stiffness the next day which is to be expected following a change in the body.
• I want to be as thorough as I can here….Tyce, do you see 50%-67% minor harms in your daily practice?

Wrap It Up
In true AMA fashion, instead of just coming out and saying, “Chiropractic adjustments showed moderate quality evidence for effectiveness in pain as well as in function,” the authors instead stated in conclusion, “Among patients with acute low back pain, spinal manipulative therapy was associated with modest improvements in pain and function at up to 6 weeks, with transient minor musculoskeletal harms. However, heterogeneity in study results was large.” Heterogeneity is defined as, “The quality or state of being diverse in character or content.” In my opinion, this is to give themselves and “out” by implying there was not enough focus to the RCTs to truly state their findings as fact.

Nonetheless, when the AMA comes even remotely close to endorsing anything having to do with Chiropractic, I’ll take it. And so should those in the medical field that commonly come in contact with those seeking help for their acute and chronic low back pain.

So…….We Should Be All Set For Success Now Right? Maybe they’re about to open up a chiropractic low back pain wing of the hospital, right?

That is what you’ think but there is new information from the White House that this simply is not the case despite the obvious ramifications. You can find the link in the show notes but on page 57 of The President’s Commission On Combating Drug Addiction and The Opioid Crisis report, the authors say, “A key contributor to the opioid epidemic has been the excess prescribing of opioids for common pain complaints and for postsurgical pain. Although in some conditions, behavioral programs, acupuncture, chiropractic, surgery, as well as FDA-approved multimodal pain strategies have been proven to reduce the use of opioids, while providing effective pain management, current CMS reimbursement policies, as well as health insurance providers and other payers, create barriers to the adoption of these strategies.” This is straight from the White House.

At the bottom of page 57, you will also see that it says, “The Commission recommends CMS review and modify rate-setting policies that discourage the use of non-opioid treatments for pain, such as certain bundled payments that make alternative treatment options cost prohibitive for hospitals and doctors, particularly those options for treating immediate post-surgical pain.”

What say you Tyce?
Tyce: You mean like a specialist copay for chiro care and a lower copay for primary care? Or covering surgery 100% and NOT covering non-surgical means.

Essentially, the United States Government is admitting there is professional discrimination at the highest levels…..hello Medicare and Health Insurance plans….I’m talking to you….this discrimination creates barriers to doing the smart thing.

The smart thing is seeing a chiropractor for your back pain. The “Big Guys” (AKA: American College of Physicians and the American Medical Association) recommend it and the government says policies are in place to prevent patients from following those recommendations.

In addition, policies that discriminate against chiropractic or chiropractors run in violation of Section 2706 of PPACA. It comes full circle.
I know you have something good to say here Tyce…

Tyce: The beautiful thing we get to see in our office, since we have both medicine and chiropractic working together, is the end of the story…people getting off the mind altering drugs, healing, and getting their lives back. All we do is follow these simple guidelines.

I have a question to pose to the entire Chiropractic profession: How in the heck do we deal with this?

It has to be through either the legislature at the state and federal levels or it has to be through the legal system. A guarantee I feel comfortable making is that the insurance companies won’t begin enforcing it on their own.

Mobilization and unification of the Chiropractic profession is probably where it starts.

Some steps toward that end include:
• Join or get involved with your state association. They’re the only ones effectively fighting for you and your rights on the state level.
• Join or get involved with your national association. They’re the only ones effectively fighting for you and your rights on the national level.
• If possible, build relationships with your state and national legislators.
• Donate to all of the above in the largest amounts you are comfortable with.
• Tell your friends and your colleagues about what is going on and help them get involved if they’re so inclined.
• Follow the news of your industry closely and stay knowledgeable about your profession. Both the good AND the bad.

Tyce, you have served for years and you’re still serving your profession. What you got on this?
Tyce: “Be part of the solution. You don’t have to dedicate 24/7 to the crusade….but you could do a little more. Right?”

A Chiropractic profession that is unified and playing offense instead of defense is powerful and is one of the worst nightmares of some folks I know out there in the world. Personally, as a side note, I like to see people like that squirm just a little don’t you? It just feels good. Makes what’s left of my hair stand up.

So won’t you consider helping if you haven’t before? If you don’t know where to start, email me at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com and I will help you get on your way.

Tyce, I want to thank you for taking the time to come on the podcast and share your genius with us. With our history, I’m sure that Chiropractic Forward podcast listeners can count on your being a guest many many times. And, the next time will be the third time and I can say something like, “It was so nice, we had to do it thrice, with Tyce….or something stupid but entertaining like that.” Thanks for joining us today.

When Chiropractic is at its best, you cannot beat the risk vs reward ratio.

Did you know that research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, in comparison to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic? Chiropractic care is safe, more cost-effective, it decreases your chances of having surgery, and it reduces your chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically. In addition, we can do it with minimal time requirements and minimal hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health!

Please feel free to send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think or what suggestions you may have for us for future episodes. If you love what you hear, be sure to check out www.chiropracticforward.com. As this podcast builds, so will the website as we add more content, educational products, and a little further down the road, webinars, seminars, and speaking dates as they get added.

 

In the meantime, here are some of our recent podcasts that may be of interest:

CF 012: Proven Means To Treat Neck Pain

CF 008: With Dr. Craig Benton – Brand New Information Based on Results Chiropractic Proven Effective For Low Back Pain

CF 010: Surprise Unique Information Shows Chiropractic May Work On The Brain Too

 

 

 

 

We cannot wait to connect again with you next week. From Creek Stone here in Amarillo, TX, home of the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

References and Source Material
1. https://www.amarillochiropractor.com/startling-medical-professional-attacks-chiropractic/
2. https://www.amarillochiropractor.com/healthcare-in-texas-the-battle-against-a-monopoly-a-true-story-about-david-goliath-3/
3. https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/whitehouse.gov/files/images/The%20Underestimated%20Cost%20of%20the%20Opioid%20Crisis.pdf
4. https://www.acatoday.org/Portals/60/Docs/Advocacy%20and%20Reimbursement/2706/2706-FAQs.pdf?ver=2015-12-23-125425-503
5. https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2603228/noninvasive-treatments-acute-subacute-chronic-low-back-pain-clinical-practice
6. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2616395?widget=personalizedcontent&previousarticle=2616379
7. https://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/whitehouse.gov/files/images/Final_Report_Draft_11-3-2017.pdf

 

CF 010: Surprise Unique Information Shows Chiropractic May Work On The Brain Too

Surprise Unique Information Shows Chiropractic May Work On The Brain Too

Welcome to the Chiropractic Forward podcast. I am your host Dr. Jeff Williams and we’re exctied to have you along for the ride. In today’s show, we’re going to talk about how chiropractic may work in the brain itself rather than how it affects just the musculoskeletal system.  We include some intriguing stuff from New Zealand that will make you think, hmmmm, that’s interesting, and we’ll have a little fun along the way

Bring on the bumper music

Again, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast This is where we talk about issues related to health, chiropractic, evidence, and research and how those things all fit into a comprehensive approach for treating different conditions. Thank you for taking time out of your day to give us a listen. I know your time is valuable and I will always try hard to fill our time with valuable content.

You have bobbed and weaved your way into episode #9 of the Chiropractic Forward podcast.

Before we get started, I want to draw your attention to the reviews over at iTunes. If you would be kind enough to leave us a great review, that tells iTunes that people are finding value in what we are sharing and it will help us grow this podcast. We sure would appreciate you!

For anyone that has paid any amount of attention to chiropractic, it’s clear that chiropractic treats muscles, bones, and the biomechanics overall. But what some people don’t commonly consider is the fact that chiropractic is effective when treating the nerves that make it all work together.

For instance, what do you think about when you think of chiropractic? More than likely, you think about back pain, neck pain, athletes, and headaches and migraines. It is unlikely that phrases like “cortical drive” or “movement related cortical potential” comes to mind.

According to the author of the paper we’re going to be talking about today, “Scientists use to believe spinal manipulation was a biomechanical treatment option for spinal pain conditions. However, the growing basic science evidence suggests there may be more of a neurophysiological effect following spinal manipulation than previously realized.”

When we begin to talk about the brain, physiology, neurology, and neurological processes, you can get into some highly complicated terms and ideas. I’m going to do everything I can to put it into terms that anyone and everyone can easily process without having a year of neurology classes.

And let’s be crystal clear, I’m not a neurologist or a chiropractic neurology diplomate either with tons of extra education on the brain and nervous system specifically. Many of these terms go above MOST of our heads and MOST of the heads in the medical field as well. That is just a matter of fact. But that doesn’t mean we can’t read, comprehend, and relay the overall pertinent information, which is what we are doing here.

Basically, “What’s the big idea?” That’s what I’m trying to bring to you here without making your eyes glaze over and making you fall into a deep state of hibernation.

Now, with all of that being said, there is some potentially fascinating research coming out of New Zealand we’re going to be talking about here having to do with the dact that chiropractic may work on the brain itself. We are going to talk about two papers that have been done by roughly the same group at the Centre for Chiropractic Research at the New Zealand College of Chiropractic in Auckland New Zealand. Just the name “Auckland” makes me want to go visit. I hear New Zealand is fantastic and the Lord Of The Rings was filmed there so you know it’s stunning. If an epic is filmed in your country, then you know it must be truly epic.

Here is a bit of a disclaimer to start off with. I have seen some dispute from other evidence-based chiropractors online of a different study from Dr. Haavick so I want you to understand that this sort of research cannot be accepted as the gospel. Not just yet anyway. I’d say it’s promising to an extent but there needs to be A LOT more exploration here before we hold it up as the gospel truth. Today’s podcast is more of a, “Hey, look what they’re studying, look what their findings are, and look what the potential for this sort of study could be.” rather than drawing any firm conclusions at this time.

The first study is titled, “Impact of Spinal Manipulation on Cortical Drive to Upper and lower Limb Muscles,” and was published in the journal ‘Brain Sciences’ in December of 2016(1).

Why They Did It

The researcher wanted to find out whether chiropractic care changes motor control. Motor control is basically the messages your brain sends your body in order make it move. Bending your arm, writing on a piece of paper, kicking your leg, or walking are examples of motor control. They assessed whether chiropractic care affected motor control for the arms as well as the legs and tried to find out if the changes may partly happen in the cortical part of the brain, which   is the part that issues motor commands. Although the researchers couldn’t completely rule out the idea that chiropractic adjustments can help motor function at the actual spinal level manipulated, the theory was that some of the changes must happen in the brain itself.  Basically, do chiropractors change how the brain controls muscles(2)? 

How They Did It

  • They conducted two experiments to test their theory. One for the arm and one for the leg.
  • In the first, transcranial magnetic stimulation input-output curves for an upper limb muscle known as the abductor pollicis brevis were recorded.
  • They also recorded F-waves before and after spinal manipulation or the control intervention for the control group on the same subjects on two different days.
  • The researchers did the same in a separate experiment for the lower limb using the tibialis anterior muscle.

What They Found

Before getting into what they found, let’s define the term motor evoked potential.”  According to Medscape, the definition is, “Single- or repetitive-pulse stimulation of the brain causes the spinal cord and peripheral muscles to produce neuroelectrical signals known as motor evoked potentia ls. Clinical uses of motor evoked potential include as a tool for the diagnosis and evaluation of multiple sclerosis and as a prognostic indicator for stroke motor recovery(3).”

With that knowledge the following was noted:

  • Spinal manipulation caused an increase in maximum motor evoked potential in both muscles tested.

Wrap It Up

In a quote from the research abstract, the authors conclude, “Spinal manipulation may therefore be indicated for the patients who have lost tonus of their muscle and or are recovering from muscle degrading dysfunctions such as stroke or orthopaedic operations. These results may also be of interest to sports performers. We suggest these findings should be followed up in the relevant populations.”

In another quote from the lead author, she said, “This research has big implications,says an enthusiastic Heidi Haavik. “It is possible that patients who have lost muscle tonus and/or are recovering from muscle degrading dysfunctions such as stroke or orthopaedic operations could also benefit from chiropractic care. These findings are also very relevant to sports performers (although this too must also be followed up with more research), because it indicates that chiropractic care may help their brains to more efficiently produce greater outputs. So all in all a very exciting study!”

Guess what? They took their own advice in their conclusion and followed up this paper with another similar paper focused more specifically on athletic performance. Here’s the last paper we will discuss called, “The Effects of a Single Session of Spinal Manipulation on Strength and Cortical Drive in Athletes” published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology in January of 2018. Brand new information(5).

Why The Did It

Of course, they did it because they suggested the need for the paper in the conclusion of the previous study but more specifically, they did it because they wanted to test if a single chiropractic adjustment could change things in the muscles of the lower leg for an elite Taekwondo athlete.

How They Did It

  • The muscle measured was the soleus muscle, which lies just under what is commonly known as the calf muscle or the gastrocnemius.
  • Soleus evoked V-waves, H-reflex and maximum voluntary contraction of the plantar flexors were recorded from 11 elite Taekwondo athletes
  • A randomized controlled crossover design was utilized.
  • Treatments used consisted of either spinal manipulation in the treatment group or passive movement control in the control group.
  • Outcome measurements were noted prior to treatment, immediately after treatment, 30 minutes after treatment, and an hour after treatment.

What They Found

  • Spinal manipulation was responsible for increasing each factor measured when compared to the control group.
  • The differences were considered significant through each time interval.

Wrap It Up

The authors are quoted in the conclusion of the paper as saying, “A single session of spinal manipulation increased muscle strength and corticospinal excitability to ankle plantar flexor muscles in elite Taekwondo athletes. The increased maximum voluntary contraction force lasted for 30 minutes and the corticospinal excitability increase persisted for at least 60 minutes.“

As I said in the beginning, I feel that this sort of research is really just beginning and consider it in its infancy but I also think that the results are enough to demand more exploration into this area of how chiropractic can affect neurology.

There is actually a court case in Texas this very minute. The appeals argument starts on February 28th down in Austin. The Texas Medical Association is attacking Texas Chiropractors’ rights to treat the “neuromusculoskeletal” system. They argue that chiropractors do not (and cannot) treat anything further than the “musculoskeletal”system. Certainly, NOT the “neuromusculoskeletal” system.

Regardless of the opinions held by those in the leadership of the Texas Medical Association and their legal team, both of these papers (and many other by the way), in my opinion, render their arguments ignorant, nit-picky, archaic, and obsolete. It’s not a question of what research is out there. It’s a question of if they can understand it or will let their pride go. My guess is, “No.” They have to prevent Chiropractic from moving into their territory at any and all costs. It is NOT about patient safety. It never has been and it never will be. It’s purely based on power and the threat of losing it.

What’s your opinion. We would love to hear it.

Research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, compared to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic. It’s safe, more cost-effective, decreases chances of surgery, and reduces chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically and do it with minimal time requirements and hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health! And, of course now, we see that chiropractic may work on the brain too!

Please feel free to send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think or what suggestions you may have for us for future episodes. If you love what you hear, be sure to check out www.chiropracticforward.com. As this podcast builds, so will the website as we add more content, educational products, and a little further down the road, webinars, seminars, and speaking dates as they get added.

We cannot wait to connect again with you next week. From Creek Stone here in Amarillo, TX, home of the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Sources:

  1. Haavik H, Niazi IK, Jochumsen M, Sherwin D, Flavel S, Türker KS. Impact of Spinal Manipulation on Cortical Drive to Upper and Lower Limb Muscles. Brain Sci. 2016 Dec 23;7(1).https://chiropracticscience.com/increase-cortical-drive-following-spinal-manipulation/

2) https://spinalresearch.com.au/new-study-reveals-impact-spinal-manipulation-cortical-drive-limb-muscles/

3) https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1139085-overview

4) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322199907_The_Effects_of_a_Single_Session_of_Spinal_Manipulation_on_Strength_and_Cortical_Drive_in_Athletes

5) Christiansen L, et. al. (2018). The Effects of a Single Session of Spinal Manipulation on Strength and Cortical Drive in Athletes. European Journal of Applied Physiology. . 10.1007/s00421-018-3799-x/fulltext.html.

CF 008: With Dr. Craig Benton – Brand New Information Based on Results Chiropractic Proven Effective For Low Back Pain

Today’s episode is all about chronic low back pain and some great, brand new research. By now, as I’ve said in the past, even traditional Chiropractor-hating, torch-wielding, quasi-scholastic chiropractic detractors are admitting that, yes, Chiropractic is indeed helpful for low back pain.

If you love what you hear, be sure to check out www.chiropracticforward.com. As the podcast builds, so too will the website content, educational products, webinars, seminars, and speaking dates as they get added.

For now though, it’s time for bumper music!

We will dive into the research in a few minutes but first, I have to introduce my guest this week. His name is Dr. Craig Benton. Dr. Benton is the owner/operator of Benton Chiropractic down in Lampassas, Texas but that’s not where the intro stops. Dr. Benton is the chair of Scientific Affairs for the Texas Chiropractic Association. He is where I have found a healthy percentage of the material that I have covered over the years for my blog, my YouTube videos, and now for the Chiropractic Forward podcast. Dr. Benton has been unknowingly instrumental in keeping me in business and making my life easier.

Welcome to the show Dr. Benton, how is life in Lampassas this week? My first question today is, have you been playing any guitar lately?

Dr. Benton and I are both in active practice. In fact, there’s a chance we may both have a patient show up at any time. That’s how actively we are practicing. I think that’s incredibly important to note because, so many times, you hear podcasts and attend seminars where the guys and gals speaking don’t really know a thing about actively practicing for 20 plus years. I’ve always felt that experience matters. Even when I was young and green. I was well-aware that I didn’t know it all and I’m even more aware of that today than ever.

So Dr. Benton, I’m looking forward to hearing your opinions and insight today.

Since the podcast today is about chronic pain, I think we should begin with a definition of what Chronic really is. When we define “chronic” in the context of neuromusculoskeletal complaints, we define it as being a complaint that is greater than 12 weeks in duration. Right at 3 months. Some patients will come into the office having had a condition for 15-20 years. I tell them that they are more than a little stubborn to have put up with something for so long.

It is common sense that a condition that is chronic will be more difficult to treat. Also, most chronic conditions can be traced back to a biomechanical, neuromusculoskeletal origin. One of my favorite quotes is from Dr. Lee Green, Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan. He said, “Neck pain is a mechanical problem, and it makes sense that mechanical treatment works better than a chemical one.” Although Dr. Green is referring to neck pain in this instance, “low back pain” can easily be substituted. What he says could not make more sense. It’s an easy and very concise way to understand why Chiropractic, manipulation, mobilization is so incredibly effective above and beyond anything else for this sort or issue, including medication.

Do you have a quote or quotes that you love sharing that make sense to you and that help you boil down what it is we chiropractors are doing to help our patients?

I have overhead medical doctors (more than once) talking about having back pain and just injecting themselves with something to try to get over it. If they asked me, I’d tell them that they’re just covering up an underlying trigger or cause and ignoring it is to their detriment.

A good metaphor I came across for using medication for neuromusculoskeletal complaints is that it’s like unplugging a smoke alarm because you don’t like the noise. But, the fire is still slowly growing. What have they done to treat anything in a responsible and effective way? Nothing at all. We tend to live in a society that wants a pill for this and a potion for that so they can get over it and get on with life. But it doesn’t work that way.

Dr. Benton, has this been your experience as well?

Dr. Benton, don’t you treat soldiers through the VA program? Can you tell us all a little bit about that?

Let’s go over some low back pain statistics just we can try to stress the importance of what we’re talking about here. Dr. Benton, please feel free to jump in with anything you’d like to add:

  • Low back pain is the single leading cause of disability worldwide.
  • 8 out of every ten people will experience back pain. I will admit that I have never met anyone in 45 years of life on this Earth that fit’s into the 20% that apparently never suffers from any low back pain. Dr. Benton….have you ever met anyone that has never had back pain? Is it just me?
  • Back pain is the second most common reason for visits to the doctor’s office right behind upper-respiratory infections.
  • With such gains and leaps in the medical industry as far as treatment goes, low back pain is stubbornly on the rise.
  • More than half of Americans who experience low back pain spend the majority of the work day sitting. 54% to be exact. It’s good to be a chiropractor I guess. Our patients keep us up and moving most of the day.
  • Dr. Benton, did you know that….now…an equal number of patients seek help with a chiropractor first as seek help with a medical practitioner first for back pain? That’s new information to me that I found interesting.
  • Back pain in general costs $100 billion dollars every year when you factor in lost wages, productivity as well as legal and insurance overheads.

Now that we all know more about low back pain, let’s go through some things that may put you at greater risk of suffering from the condition. Dr. Benton, with your experience on the research, stop me if you have anything to add to any of these:

  • Age: as the spine and supporting structures begin to age and decline, the rate of low back pain will understandably increase.
  • Fitness Level: physically active people do not suffer low back pain to at the rate inactive people suffer. A healthy exercise and core building protocol can help reduce symptoms or instances of low back pain.
  • Weight Gain: Being overweight or obese and gaining weight quickly places increased strain on the low back.
  • Pregnancy: This one goes without saying. Pelvic changes and weight gain both contribute.
  • Genetics: Some forms of arthritis or other systemic conditions are genetic in nature
  • Work: Jobs that include heavy labor and or twisting or expose people to vibration consistently can be problematic. Jobs that require long periods of sitting in a chair can be equally problematic.
  • Mental health factors: Many people are able to deal with chronic pain but anxiety and depression are conditions that can cause a person to focus on the pain which tends to raise the perceived severity and significance for the person suffering from the condition. Dr. Benton, have you come across any patients that fit this description in your practice?
  • Improper backpack use: Kids suffer back pain needlessly since they are not traditionally in an age range we would consider to be a risk factor. However, backpacks used improperly are a common culprit. A backpack should never be more than 15%-20% of a child’s weight and should be carried on both shoulders with the bottom being at or about waste level.

What does the research say?

As I’m sure Dr. Benton will agree…..the research says a lot, to be honest. In fact, I’d say that there’s more research for the effectiveness of manipulation/mobilization in low back pain than for any other conditions chiropractors commonly treat. Am I out of bounds here Dr. Benton?

The research shows Chiropractic beating general practitioners in effectiveness as well as cost. The research shows Chiropractic beating common medications prescribed for low back pain. The research shows Chiropractic beating physical therapy and exercise alone. The research shows Chiropractic beating epidural spinal injections for low back pain. And the two of us can point you to randomized controlled trials proving it. Basically, the research is clear.

In January of 2018, a brand new research paper dealing with manipulation and mobilization was published in Spine Journal by Ian Coulter, PhD et. al. titled “Manipulation and mobilization for treating chronic low back pain: a systematic review” and funded by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.

Now, to be clear, Spine Journal sounds a little bit like it may be a Chiropractic publication for those of you that don’t commonly read research abstracts…… but it is not.

Dr. Benton, can you describe Spine Journal for us?

Here’s why the authors took this project on.

The authors of the paper stated that there remained questions about manipulation and mobilization efficacy, the proper dosing of the techniques, how safe they are, as well as how they compare to other treatment protocols commonly used for chronic low back pain.

I have to say that I had no remaining questions regarding really ANY of those topics but it seems that these authors did.

Dr. Benton, again, please feel free to jump in anywhere you’d like as we go through the hows, why’s and the what’s here.

Here’s How They Did It

  • This paper was a systematic review and meta-analysis.
  • They searched databases for relevant studies from January 2000-March 2017
  • They chose randomized controlled trials that compared manipulation or mobilization to sham treatment, no treatment, other therapies, and multimodal therapeutic approaches.
  • They assessed the risk of bias using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network.
  • Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was applied to determine the confidence in effect estimates.
  • 51 trials were included

What They Found

  • Within 7 of those trials on manipulation and/or mobilization there was reduction of disability when compared to other forms of therapy.
  • Further analyses showed that manipulation specifically was responsible for significant reduction in pain and disability when put up against therapies such as exercise and physical therapy.
  • Mobilization was also was significantly more effective when compared to exercise regimens for pain reduction but not for disability.

Wrap It Up

In the conclusion of the paper abstract, the authors say, “There is moderate-quality evidence that manipulation and mobilization are likely to reduce pain and improve function for patients with chronic low back pain; manipulation appears to produce a larger effect than mobilization. Both therapies appear safe.”

As I’ve said many times, “a lot of research in your favor becomes fact.” Chiropractic has A LOT of research in its favor.

Dr. Benton, would you like to add any final thoughts?

I’d like to thank Dr. Benton for taking the time to be with us today. He really is one of the guys out here in the real world trying his best to help change things for Chiropractors in Texas and in the world.

I want to finish off by saying that when Chiropractic is at its best, you cannot beat the risk vs reward ratio. Plain and simple.

Just another reason to call a chiropractor TODAY!

Research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, compared to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic. It’s safe, more cost-effective, decreases chances of surgery, and reduces chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically and do it with minimal time requirements and hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health!

Please feel free to send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think or what suggestions you may have for us for future episodes. Please remember, we need your help to spread the word and grow this podcast. If you would help us out by sharing our podcast information, our website, and social media entities, we would greatly appreciate your help.

We cannot wait to connect again with you next week. From Creek Stone here in Amarillo, TX, home of the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Research Citation:

Coulter I, et. al. “Manipulation and mobilization for treating chronic low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis” The Spine Journal, Volume 0 , Issue 0 ,

https://www.thespinejournalonline.com/article/S1529-9430(18)30016-0/fulltext

CF 007: Awesome Alternatives To High Blood Pressure Treatment

In today’s podcast, we are going to talk about high blood pressure, what happens, how many people it affects, and what we may be able to do to help it. Today is all about high blood pressure and I’m going to admit to you….in researching for this week’s podcast, even I learned new things about high blood pressure and I’m betting you will too. If you love what you hear, be sure to check out www.chiropracticforward.com. As this podcast builds, so will the website as we add more content, educational products, and a little further down the road, webinars, seminars, and speaking dates as they get added.

Welcome to the podcast today, Dr. Jeff Williams here with Creek Stone here in Amarillo, TX and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast where we talk about issues related to health, chiropractic, evidence, and research and how those things all fit into a comprehensive approach for treating different conditions. Thank you for taking time out of your day to give us a listen. I know your time is valuable and I will always try hard to fill our time with valuable content.

You have fallen head first into episode #7 this week and I want to welcome you. We are going to have more fun that headbutting an i-beam..which I actually did on accident one time when I was a kid. I was running away from someone while playing tag and was looking over my shoulder wrhen smack…now I have a scare on the side of my noggin 35-40 years later. This is how I am certain we will have more fun with this episode.

Speaking of fun, with this being a brand new podcast, I can’t tell you how much fun it is to check the stats of the show and see people tuning in and finding value in our ideas and in information we have to share with you.

I think it is responsible to start off with a disclaimer: I am not a cardiologist. I am a research-minded, evidence-based Doctor of Chiropractic that has seen a jillion people with high blood pressure throughout a 20-year career. The ideas and discussion to follow will be based on information derived from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from the American Heart Institute, and from information shared through Dr. Stephen Sinatra of New York, who is a cardiologist and founder of the New England Heart Center. Ultimately, your blood pressure and heart health is something your primary practitioner and/or cardiologist should be monitoring consistently. Our intent here is not to “treat” anyone through the internet but to simply raise awareness and encourage you to pay attention and take steps to protect yourself if needed. Do not simply depend on information from the internet or Dr. Google as I call it. If you are suffering from high blood pressure (or think you might be) make an appointment with your primary today.

Now that we’ve taken care of that, let’s get going with an easy definition of high blood pressure. According to the American Heart Association, high blood pressure is when your blood pressure, the force of the blood flowing through your blood vessels, is consistently too high.

I want to tell you all why, at times, I should have high blood pressure. It’s because I have a teenager. Yes, I have a 15 year old high school kid and he’s why. Lol. Not really, as far as teenagers go, he could be soooo much worse. Other than his need to be right conflicting with my need to be right, he’s a sweetheart.

Other reasons may be a busted pipe in the pool house when we had a major freeze. I know I know…first world problems… I happen to be the owner of a european great dane…..enough said. That girl can tear some stuff up when she gets bored.

I also have a huge Leonberger dog. Look it up. They’re beautiful but the hair…I’m telling you, it’s a job to stay clean. I could make cushions out of the amount of hair that dog generates.

The animals at my house at this point would include two dogs, a cat (not my choice), two guineas, and two turtles..and that doesn’t even include my 10 year old daughter and my teenage son… I probably have some mice too if I’m guessing right.

Not to mention I’m an actively practicing chiropractor running a busy practice and all of the stressors that come with it. Own your own business they said, be your own boss they said….you’ll be able to do whatever you want. Heck, I don’t have time to think twice and I certainly don’t have a lot of time to sit around and generate content. I’m busy humpin it and making a living. I’m not out on the lecture circuit just yet and having dinner and a drink in the hotel bar. Lol. I’m at work all day every day. I have stress people!! That’s all I’m saying.

But seriously, I have actually been very fortunate and have not had to battle with high blood pressure yet. Thank the good Lord. I am just lucky I think.

From personal experience in treating patients, I have seen new patients having blood pressure counts of 200 over 110 before and they had NO IDEA their blood pressure was high. What does a chiropractor do in that instance? You may get different ideas from different chiropractors but I can tell you what THIS chiropractor does in those cases. I send them either directly to their primary practitioner or the urgent care, whichever they prefer. I won’t touch them as far as chiropractic treatment until the blood pressure is under control.

There is research we will discuss in a minute showing chiropractic is effective in controlling high blood pressure but I will not be the one trying to get it down when it is at that level. I’ll be the one trying to help once it’s normalized. That is simply my opinion and the way I choose to go about things in my practice. As I said, other chiropractors likely have other opinions and protocols.

Next, let’s discuss some high blood pressure facts from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention that you may not already know about concerning WHO is commonly affected:

  • Did you know that about 75 million Americans suffer from high blood pressure? That’s about a third of the population. Another way of saying that is that 1 in every 3 people have high blood pressure. 
  • Unfortunately, only about half of the people with high blood pressure have the condition under control.
  • About 11 million adults in America have high blood pressure and don’t even know it.
  • High blood pressure costs America around $46 Billion every year when you account for the cost of health care services, medications, and days out of work.
  • High blood pressure affects women about as much as it affects men overall but under the age of 45, more men are affected. Over the age of 65, more women have the condition.
  • When we look at race, more black people have high blood pressure than do whites and Hispanics, and of the black people having it, more women are affected than men.
  • Women having high blood pressure that then become pregnant are more likely to have complications.
  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure during the midlife phase (45-65) seems to be linked to higher risks of dementia later in life.

Here are some of those random facts that you may be able to use in a game of Trivial Pursuit somewhere down the line:

  • Did you know that too little salt can contribute to high blood pressure? We commonly associate an excess of salt with high blood pressure but too little is an issue as well. According to Dr. Stephen Sinatra, a cardiologist from New York, it seems a good mix is keeping more than 1.8 grams of salt a day in your body while keeping sodium below 2.8 mg/day while keeping a close eye on hidden salts that can be found in canned soups, pickles, salted nuts, etc.
  • Potassium plays a part in healthy blood pressure so it’s likely a good idea to foods like eggplant, squash, bananas, coconut water, and baked potatoes.
  • It’s a good idea to have the blood pressure taken in both arms since the numbers are often different from one arm to the other.
  • Cardio is great but weight training can RAISE blood pressure. If you like to lift weights but suffer from high blood pressure, it would probably be a great idea to lift much lighter with higher reps in an attempt to bring down those numbers.

Now let’s talk about some of the causes of high blood pressure in patients:

  • Emotional stress
  • Being overweight
  • Environmental toxins
  • Smoking
  • Lack of exercise
  • Too much salt as well as too little salt
  • More than one or two drinks of alcohol per day.
  • Age
  • Genetics

What risks do you run when leaving your high blood pressure untreated or uncontrolled? As unpleasant as it may be to discuss, it can be as serious as you may have imagined. Here are the potential outcomes of untreated high blood pressure:

  • The CDC states that over 360,000 U.S. citizens died of high blood pressure in 2013 which totals about 1,000 deaths every single day.
  • High blood pressure increases your risk of having a heart attack, of having a stroke, of having long-lasting heart failure, and of having kidney disease.

Here’s brand new and very interesting research paper I wanted to take the time to discuss. It’s by AP Wong and is titled “Review: Beyond conventional therapies: Complementary and alternative medicine in the management of hypertension: An evidence-based review(1).”

Why They Did It

The authors state that high blood pressure is responsible for about 12.8% of all deaths globally. Considering that staggering fact, the World Health Organization has targeted a 25% reduction in high blood pressure by the year 2025 and has encouraged more evidence and research into non-conventional methods of controlling high blood pressure.

How They Did It

  • The authors of the paper had two main objectives

1. Describe the therapeutic modalities commonly used in treating high blood pressure.

2. Review the current level of evidence that has been attained for each.

  • The researchers used a search from 2005-2013 of the databses MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, PUBMED, and EMBASE.
  • 23 papers were found and accepted.
  • Modalities identified in the 23 papers were fish oil, qigong, yoga, coenzyme Q10, melatonin, meditation, vitamin D, vitamin C, monounsaturated fatty acids, dietary amino-acids, chiropractic, osteopathy, folate, inorganic nitrate, beetroot juice, beetroot bread, magnesium, and L-arginine.

What They Found

The following therapies had weak to no evidence for effectiveness in treating high blood pressure:

  • Fish oil
  • Yoga
  • Vitamin D
  • Monounsaturated fatty acid
  • Dietary amino-acids
  • Osteopathy

The following therapies showed significant reduction in blood pressure:

  • Chiropractic
  • Magnesium
  • Qigong
  • Melatonin
  • Meditation
  • Vitamin C
  • Folate
  • Inorganic nitrate
  • Beetroot juice
  • L-arginine

Coenzyme Q10 has differing results. Some studies showed it had weak to no effectiveness while other studies showed it to have significant effect on the reduction of high blood pressure.

Wrap It Up

In a quote from the authors conclusion, they said, “Results from this review suggest that certain non-conventional therapies may be effective in treating hypertension and improving cardiac function and therefore considered as part of an evidence-based approach.”

With all of the information combined from the articles used as source material, including the research paper, the Alternative means of treating high blood pressure may include:

  • CHIROPRACTIC – we will talk more about this in just a moment
  • Coenzyme Q10 – More discussion on Coenzyme Q10 later.
  • Magnesium
  • Ribose
  • L-arginine
  • RestricT carbohydrates
  • Use olive oil – consider adopting the use of the Mediterranean Pan-Asian diet which is a non-inflammatory diet.
  • Cutting sugar out of your diet is crucial for those suffering from high blood pressure.
  • Less alcohol is best but a glass of wine a day has shown benefits.
  • No processed juices from the grocery store. They’re packed full of useless and damaging sugars.
  • Exercise protocols
  • Lose weight – only a five pound reduction can make a difference
  • Stop smoking!
  • Qigong
  • Melatonin
  • Meditation
  • Vitamin C
  • Folate
  • Inorganic nitrate
  • Beetroot juice

Besides this study, there are several other suggesting Chiropractic plays an important role in reducing or controlling blood pressure.

In one from 1988 by Yates, et. al. called “Effects of chiropractic treatment on blood pressure and anxiety: a randomized, controlled trial,” they showed how anxiety and blood pressure were significantly reduced following chiropractic treatment(2).

In another very interesting study through the University of Chicago Medicine from March 14, 2007, and led by George Bakris, MD (director of the hypertension center at the University of Chicago Medical Center, researchers did the following:

  • They took 50 Chicago-area citizens having high blood pressure.
  • All had misaligned C1 vertebrae measured on x-ray
  • They were randomly divided into a treatment group consisting of a chiropractic adjustment and a sham group where no treatment was actually performed.
  • The participants were assessed at the beginning of treatment, after the chiropractic adjustment, and at the end of eight weeks.

What They Found

The authors stated that the improvement in blood pressure for both systolic and diastolic were similar to that seen when giving patients two different blood pressure medications at the same time. Not only that, but the reduction in the blood pressure continued in the eighth week!

Wow!!!

When Chiropractic is at its best, you cannot beat the risk vs reward ratio. Plain and simple. Spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment rather than chemical treatment such as pain killers, muscle relaxants, and anti-inflammatories.

Just another reason to call a chiropractor TODAY!

Research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, in comparison to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic. Chiropractic care is safe, more cost-effective, it decreases your chances of having surgery, and it reduces your chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically. In addition, we can do it with minimal time requirements and minimal hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health!

Please feel free to send us an email at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com and let us

know what you think or if you have any suggestions for future episodes. And remember

to help us spread the word by sharing our podcast with your colleagues, your friends,

and your family.

From Creek Stone in Amarillo, TX and the flight deck of the Chiropractic Forward

podcast, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, & forward.

Research Citations

(1) Wong AP, et al. “Review: Beyond conventional therapies: Complementary and alternative medicine in the management of hypertension: An evidence-based review.” Pak J Pharm Sci. 2018 Jan;31(1):237-244.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/29348109/

(2) Yates RG, et. al. “Effects of chiropractic treatment on blood pressure and anxiety: a randomized, controlled trial.” J Manip Physical Ther. 1988 Dec;11(6):484-8.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3075649

(3) Bakris, G. Journal of Human Hypertension, advance online publication, March 2, 2007. Grassi, G. Journal of Human Hypertension, advance online publication, January 25, 2007.George Bakris, MD, director, hypertension center, University of Chicago. Marshall Dickholtz Sr., DC, Chiropractic Health Center, Chicago.

http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/2007/20070314-atlas.html

Other Source Material:

https://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/facts.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/features/highbloodpressure/index.html

https://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/GettheFactsAboutHighBloodPressure/The-Facts-About-High-Blood-Pressure_UCM_002050_Article.jsp#.WmYUYyOZNBw

https://www.drsinatra.com/6-surprising-blood-pressure-facts-everyone-should-know

CF 003: Great News: Chiropractic Outpaces Muscle Relaxants

Great News: Chiropractic Outpaces Muscle Relaxants

Hey hey, Dr. Jeff Williams with the Chiropractic Forward podcast coming to you directly from the flight deck at Creek Stone Care in icey Amarillo, TX and you have stumbled head first into Episode numero 3.

Welcome welcome, this week we’re going to be talking about people that I believe may be related to unicorns because I can’t hardly believe they exist, we’ll talk about something I pondered while in the shower, and we’ll talk about what research has to say about low back pain, muscle relaxants, and chiropractic care.

I like to be an honest person so I’m just going to speak directly here and say that….I have yet to get the hang of the whole podcast thing but, I’m at least screwing it up regularly and consistency is half the battle I’m told. We’re going to have more fun than chopping wood and I firmly believe it. If you believe it, it must be true. What’s the saying? Perception is reality? I sometimes enjoy living in my own reality to tell the truth. Who doesn’t?

Speaking of unbelievable, Did yo u know that you are 75% to 85% likely to experience low back pain in your lifetime? Those are some pretty good odds. Or, bad, odds depending on how you look at it. That’s where the unicorn reference comes in here. I have a hard time believing these people exist.

By the way, I’d like to meet the 15%-25% that don’t have back pain. Wouldn’t you? Maybe these folks have been marked by God for greatness that just can’t be achieved if they’re suffering from back pain. They’re the ones looking at everyone else like, “What the heck is wrong with you people?”

How do you make it through a lifetime without back pain? That just doesn’t seem right to me. Someday, I plan on having a talk with God about this deal. I’m kind of mad about it.

Believe it or not, I remember life without back pain. I specifically remember being a kid, taking a hot shower, and thinking about adults that always gripe about back pain. I had recently heard an adult talking about how standing in a hot shower made their back feel better so that’s what made me think about it.

I thought, “That must really stink to always be hurting like that.” Well then I was smart enough to play college football and go to chiropractic school where chiropractors get to use each other as guinea pigs to learn how to help others. Yes, you could say I donated my body to science in a way. Regardless of the reasons, I am well-acquainted with the occasional back  pain. It has been intense a few times. To the point of crawling to the bathroom because I couldn’t walk to get there. It’s been years since that was the case but I certainly have empathy for my patients that come through the doors like that. It can be pure misery and it’s no wonder at all why people would look to medication for a quick fix for such intense, non-stop pain. If I’m being honest, when I remember that pain, I would be be looking for anything and everything to make it stop too.

Here’s the problem though: there arebut a few things that can help immediately. The good news here is that Chiropractic is one of the very BEST answers for this issue. The even better news is that the American Medical Association and the American College of Physicians now agree with me on this as of 2017.

That leads us into this article’s source material which is a research paper by KT Hoiriis called “A randomized clinical trial comparing chiropractic adjustments to muscle relaxants for subacute low back pain.” It was published in the Journal of Manipulative Physiological Therapeutics in July-August issue in 2004 and can be found on pages 388-398.

Why They Did It

Considering the fact that we are almost all going to suffer from low back pain at some point in our lives and considering the fact that acute pain will generally resolve and chronic pain is tough to treat, the authors of this paper were interested in trying to assess the reponsiveness of SUBacute low back pain to different treatments available. The treatment the authors chose to compare were Chiropractic treatments vs. muscle relaxants and placebo.

How They Did It

  • The platform chosen by the researchers was a randomized, double-blind clinical trial. It is high-quality information when done with this sort of design.
  • They chose 192 patients that had suffered low back pain for a time period of between 2 and 6 weeks in duration.
  • The patients were randomly split into three different groups for the purpose of the project.
  • They each underwent 2 weeks of treatment. One group with Chiropractic, one with muscle relaxants, and one with placebo.
  • The Outcome Assessments were performed through the use of the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and the Modified Zung Depression Scale.
  • These assessments were performed at the beginning of treatment (baseline), at two weeks, and at the conclusion of the treatment which was at the four week mark.
  • In addition to the Assessments previously mentioned, Schobers’s flexibility test, acetaminophen usage, and the Global Impression of Severity Scale (GIS) were assessed at the 2 week mark and at the 4 week mark.

What They Found

  • The baselines were essentially the same in all of the Outcome Assessments except for in the Global Impression of Severity Scale.
  • The subjects that actually finished the trial, 146 in all, had their data combined revealing pain, disability, depression, and the Global Impression of Severity Scale had ALL decreased significantly while flexibility for the low back was not altered.
  • Statistical differences through the groups showed that the chiropractic patients improved more than the control group and in terms of the Global Impression of Severity Scale, the chiropractic patients also improved more than the placebo group AS WELL AS the muscle relaxants group.

Wrap It Up

Chiropractic was more beneficial than placebo in reducing pain and more beneficial than either placebo or muscle relaxants in reducing GIS.

While this is good news from 2004, there are studies subsequent to this one showing how Chiropractic outpaces medication in the treatment of low back pain. These are part of the reason that they American Medical Association and the American College of Physicians recently published articles and papers recommending Chiropractic as first-line treatment for acute and chronic low back pain before even taking acetaminophen or aspirin. That’s huge folks.

Source Material

Hoiriis KT, et. al., “A randomized clinical trial comparing chiropractic adjustments to muscle relaxants for subacute low back pain.” J Manip Physiol Ther. 2004 Jul-Aug;27(6):388-98.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15319761

Just another reason to call a chiropractor TODAY!

https://www.amarillochiropractor.com/evidence-backed-reason-add-chiropractic/

 

I want you to be sure you know all about our blog and our YouTube channel. Currently, we have these entities set up under Creek Stone Integrated Care. Now, with the building of the Chiropractic Forward podcast site, how’s that going to change and how’s that going to look? I haven’t figured that part out just yet but know this, you can get your fix on all things chiropractically researched by going to amarillochiropractor.com and clicking on the blog button. Or, you can visit our youtube channel by searching Creek Stone Integrated Care in the YouTube search

Be looking for our upcoming website at chiropracticforward.com. It is not ready but it will be soon enough.

Thank you for listening. You know, sharing is caring and that’s how we get to more and more ears. If you like what you hear and you know other chiropractors or medical field professionals…..or even potential chiropractic patients….make sure you share our podcast with them. Together we can make a difference and help people get off of medication, get out of pain, and get healthier overall.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams from the Chiropractic Forward Flight deck saying upward, onward, and forward.

 

CF 001: The Chiropractic Forward Podcast Introduction – Evidence-Based,

Hey world. Welcome to our very first episode of Chiropractic Forward Podcast! It’s going to be better than stepping on Legos barefooted. Here in episode number one, we’re going to speak a little bit about what Chiro Forward means to me, why a podcast dealing with this is necessary, and why right now is the best time for the information we will be sharing here.

My very first Chiropractic Forward Podcast. Will Eventually have a dedicated website with material available but for now, you’re stuck with the newbie. But it’s good to be on the ground floor. It’s fun to watch things run their course and see where they go.

Stats On Veterans, Pain, And Medication Are Shocking And Require Urgent Action

going to revolve around a new article that came out on Observer this week and graciously shared via one of my favorite colleagues with Benton Chiropractic in Lampasas, TX, Dr. Craig Benton. The article was written by Ken Blaker, published on November 16, 2017, and called Bandaging Veterans’ Pain With Opioids Is Proving Deadly, Must Stop.”

As a portal-of-entry practitioner, I believe that ANY chiropractor will quickly agree that the veterans we see are hurt. And I do not mean just a little hurt. I have a couple of patients that have fallen out of helicopters for example. That’s the kind of hurt I am referring to. These men and women have not only risked their lives, they (in many cases) have ruined their lives.

In the article, Mr. Blaker mentions an “overburdened VA health System.” I cannot tell you how many times I have mentioned getting x-rays at the VA. Or how many times I have said something similar to, “Have you seen your VA doctor about this yet?” These types of comments and questions are ALWAYS met with an eye roll and a dismissive, “Pffft.” They don’t like going to the VA because they don’t like waiting forever to be seen and they don’t normally like the treatment they receive when they finally DO get seen by the doctor.

Combine the increased trauma and stress they put on their body with sometimes very traumatic experiences related to combat and service, and you have a volatile combination. It is easy to see why our veterans are at an increased risk of abusing (and overdosing on) opioids. Now that the United States is in an opioid epidemic, we had ALL better start paying close attention to this group of people. Especially considering the fact that this article is quoted as saying, “Veterans succumb to opioid overdose-related deaths at twice the rate of the general population.” WOW!

Mr. Blaker has a comment in this article that I will likely carry with me for the rest of my career. The quote is, “Patients are entitled to the best treatments that do the least harm.” How lovely is that? It’s perfect when we are discussing weighing the risk vs. reward ratios for chiropractic protocols and medical protocols in regards to uncomplicated neuromusculoskeletal complaints.

As the article goes on to discuss, there is a wave in the medical community as a result of the opioid epidemic. The wave is more and more in favor of not only making it harder to get hold of opioids, but also identifying alternative, non-pharmacological treatments for pain.

The current President of Parker College in Dallas and former chiropractor to the US Capitol in Washington, D.C. was quoted in the article as saying, “Non-pharmaceutical approaches to pain should always precede pharmaceutical interventions. Chiropractic, acupuncture, physiotherapy, exercise and psychosocial counseling are all preferable starting points in treating pain.”

He is standing on tall shoulders when he makes this statement. As I have discussed recently on my blog, The American College of Physicians and the American Medical Association have BOTH recently published papers and articles supporting the use of Chiropractic, Massage, and Acupuncture FIRST for chronic and low back pain before turning to any anti-inflammatories such as Ipuprofen, Tylenol, or Aspirin. One more time just for good measure: two of the biggest entities in the American medical profession now recommend seeking help from a chiropractor, massage therapist, and/or acupuncturist before taking any pills of any kind.

A collegue of mine and former President of the Texas Chiropractic Association, Dr. Tyce Hergert in Southlake, TX worked back and forth for quite some time to attempt to formulate a very concise and repeatable script for how we could accurately describe what it is we do. Here’s what we came up with.

Research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, in comparison to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic. Chiropractic care is safe, more cost-effective, it decreases your chances of having surgery, and it reduces your chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically. In addition, we can do it with minimal time requirements and minimal hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of oru patients’ health!

If you are a Chiropractor, feel free to use it. In fact, I HOPE you’ll use it! If you are a heatlhcare practioner of a different discipline, I hope it helps you further understand what we are doing and bringing to the table. If you are a patient or potential chiropractic patient, I hope it encourages you to keep on your path and spread the word about the Chiropractic Forward Podcast.

That’s it for episode one. Thank for listening to me. The first one is always the challenge and they say the rest is all downhill. I’m looking forward to where this can take us and take the profession.

I’d like to invite you, until the separate website is built and running, to visit my blog at www.amarillochiropractor.com/blog  There are LOTS of research-based blogs, articles, and papers we will be discussing over time. Don’t get in a hurry though….I don’t want you to get TOO far ahead of me. If you have ideas for future shows or have come across some great research that you think we should talk about, shoot us the information at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com We will also have future segments highlighting some of the email we get so send us emails and let us know what you think. As always, join us for more information at our home on the web, https://www.chiropracticforward.com

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams from the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, thanks again,

Upward, Onward, and Forward.