Chiropractic

American Academy of Family Physicians Warming To Chiropractic For Chronic Pain & Evidence Behind Supplements

CF 111: American Academy of Family Physicians Warming To Chiropractic For Chronic Pain & Evidence Behind Supplements

Today we’re going to talk about how the American Family Physicians may be warming up to chiropractic for chronic pain and what supplements actually have some evidence behind them.

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music


Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our facebook page, 
  • Join our private facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. No spam, just a reminder when the newest episodes go live. Nothing special so don’t worry about signing up. Just one a week friends. Check your JUNK folder!!

Do it do it do it. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #111

Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about Dry Needling vs. Massage and even more importantly, we talked about the topic of “What is your exit number?”. What are you looking to get out of it all in the end? I feel like there were points made in there that could really get you to contemplating and thinking going forward. So, make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

That reminds me, did you know that you can use our website as quite a resource? I do it all of the time. If you think I can keep every one of these papers in my noggin and pull them out of my brain files on demand, that’s a big nope. But I can go to chiropracticforward.com, click on Episodes, and use the search function to find whatever I want quickly and easily. With over 100 episodes in the tank and an average of 2-3 papers covered per episode, we have somewhere between 250 and 300 papers that can be quickly referenced along with their talking points. 

On the personal end of things…..

Rinse and repeat man, rinse and repeat. If you’re friends with me on Facebook, then you know life has been crazy and there’s no slow down in site. 

Some really positive stuff happening though too. For example, I was interviewed for two different articles in Chiropractic Economics recently. They published an article called “Chiropractic for prevention: the latest research on maintenance care” by Michele Wojciechowski. Michele used my comments exclusively in this article and that’s just a big honor. 

I remember when I was new in practice. I remember reading articles in Dynamic Chiropractic and Chiropractic Economics and thinking that would be cool to be in that one of these days. Now…..now…I’ve been fortunate enough to be in Reader’s Digest, on the ACA Blog a couple of times, and now Chiropractic Economics. It’s pretty damn exciting and it’s an honor. 

Thank you Michele for finding value in my comments and sharing them with everyone else. I’ll leave a link to that article at this point in the show notes if you’re interested in giving it a read through. 

Other than that, my family and I took a quick ski-cation to Red River, New Mexico. If you haven’t been, look it up. Here’s why we like Red River, First thing, it’s close. For a Texan to be able to just drive about 4 hours and be in the mountains, that’s pretty exciting. 

Next thing, it’s just gorgeous. And, the ski slope comes right down into the town so you don’t have to drive out to a mountain which is nice. 

Let’s talk about why I retired from skiing myself though shall we? This may make you think a bit about some of the stuff you do in your offtime. Maybe it won’t but it’s important to think about things which is the whole point of me bringing it up.

I used to ski a lot back in high school and junior high. I was pretty decent at it too. Then I went off to play football and be a college kid. Well, Louisiana for a bit and Dallas for a bit…..those areas aren’t very conducive to learning to snow ski. It’s too damn far. Especially when you’re still a kid and broke as hell. Skiing just doesn’t happen at that point in life unless you have parents taking you. I didn’t.

So then you start life and you’re building a business and there’s never time to go then either. 

Well by the time I got back around to going skiing again, I hadn’t done it in about 20 years give or take. So, i got a private coach for a morning just to get me back on that bicycle and rocking and rolling again. I have to tell you, it was hard as hell!! It was NOT like riding a bike. Nothing at all like it as a matter of fact!!

But, I took it slow, I didn’t fall at all, and was fairly happy with my progress over the weekend. HOWEVER, I got to thinking when I got home. I went back to work and had about 45 patients that next day. What if I had twisted a knee, broken and elbow, or dislocated a shoulder while I was skiing? What would I have done?

You know this sounds stupid when you say it but, “They call them accidents because you don’t plan them.” But you can avoid them sometimes. I got to thinking long and hard enough about the risk vs. rewards for continuing to ski and……honestly, on paper, it wasn’t worth the risk. 

So, I retired. Maybe if I had an associate. Maybe I could make more sense of it but, the truth is, I don’t have an associate. It’s just me although I’m thinking of hiring one just as soon as it makes sense. Anyway. I took the kids skiing while the wifey and myself enjoyed the mountains, some brewskis, and some playoff football games. 

What are you involved in as far as physical activity outside of your practice that puts you at risk and puts your ability to earn a living at risk? Do you have disability insurance? Life insurance? Long term care insurance? I have all of that. Do you need it?

Start thinking about these things. Certainly, the more successful you get and the busier your practice gets. Risking an injury just might not be worth it at some point. 

Before we dive into the reason we’re here, it’s good to support the people that support evidence-informed practitioners. Well, ChiroUp certainly does just that. 

If you don’t take advantage of the deal I’m about to offer you, I think you just might be crazy.

Regular listeners know I’ve used ChiroUp for well over a year now. I’m going to tell you want it is and then share a way to do a FREE TRIAL and, if you sign up, only pay $99/month for the first six months. So listen up!

ChiroUp is changing the way we practice by simplifying patient education and here’s what I mean: 

In a matter of seconds, you can send condition-specific reports to your patients with recommendations for treatment, activities of daily living, & for their exercises. 

This saves you so much time – no more explaining & re-explaining your patient’s care because they have access to it right there at their fingertips. 

You can be confident that your patients are getting the best possible care because the reports and exercises are populated based on what the literature recommends and isn’t that reassuring? All of that work has been done FOR you by people that are deep into the research. 

There are more than 1000 providers worldwide using ChiroUp to empower their treatments, patients, & practice.

If you don’t know what it’s all about or you’d like to check it out, do yourself a favor and go to Chiroup.com today to get started with your FREE TRIAL and, to sweeten the deal, you can use code Williams99 to pay only $99/month for your first 6 months

That’s ChiroUp.com and super saver code is Williams99.

Item #1

Let’s start with this one from American Family Physician. I got this one from one of my amazing colleagues, Dr. Craig Benton down in Lampasas, TX. It’s called “Nonpharmacologic therapies can improve chronic pain outcomes” authored by Michael Devitt and was published in American Academy of Family Physicians on January 15, 2020(Devitt M 2020). Damn it’s hot…..

Not a research paper but more of an article in their publication but has plenty to do with chiropractic. 

They set the stage here by pointing out that chronic pain is something that can cause people to go to extreme measures just to get the pain to go away. Or at least lighten up. They say this includes potentially harmful behaviors like drug and alcohol misuse and/or abuse. 

Then this article in the American Family Physicians journal starts to highlight and promote the nonpharmacologic treatment modalities that are available to family physicians. Honestly, did you think you’d ever see the day? Ever? The battle isn’t over by any stretch of the imagination but research is gradually, inch by inch, turning the tide. 

They say these modalities include simple methods like massage and heat as well as more complex therapy like acupuncture and chiropractic manipulation. They called us ‘complex’ and I’m taking that as a compliment. Lol. What we do can damn sure be complex. 

They say that these nonpharma strategies aren’t only effective for decreasing pain and improving function, but can also be effective for reducing longer-term adverse effects such as substance use disorders and suicide attempts. THAT’S A BIG DAMN DEAL. 

In fact, I got one word, two syllables….day-um. 

One researcher, the lead author from an active-duty US Army service study said “Chronic pain is associated with adverse outcomes such as substance use and suicidal thoughts and behavior,” said Esther Meerwijk, Ph.D., M.S.N., a statistician at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System in California. She added, “It made sense that if nondrug treatments are good at managing pain, their effect would go beyond only pain relief. However, I was surprised that the results of our analyses held, despite our attempts to prove them wrong.”

Despite our attempts to prove them wrong! Haven’t they been trying to prove us wrong for generations now? Lol. I always say that with all of the powers against us, if we were wrong, if we were ineffective, we would have been wiped out years ago. 

In one of her projects, they reviewed the records of more than 275,000 active-duty service members reporting chronic pain.

They combed through their files to determine whether they had received any of 13 nonpharmacologic therapies after their deployment. Those therapies were acupuncture or dry needling, biofeedback, chiropractic care, cold laser therapy, exercise therapy, lumbar supports, massage, osteopathic spinal manipulation, other physical therapy, superficial heat, traction, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and ultrasonography. 

After crunching all of the numbers and outcomes here’s what they came up with:

Specifically, service members who received nonpharmacologic therapies were

  • 8% less likely to experience new-onset alcohol and/or drug use disorders;
  • 12% less likely to experience suicidal ideation;
  • 17% less likely to experience a self-inflicted injury, including attempted suicide;
  • 18% less likely to intentionally poison themselves with opioids, related narcotics, barbiturates or sedatives; and
  • 35% less likely to accidentally poison themselves with the same types of drugs.

The researchers acknowledged several limitations in their research. For example, although most nonpharmacologic therapies were provided after service members were diagnosed with chronic pain, the authors could not determine whether those nonpharmacologic therapies were used specifically to treat that pain.

In the news release, Meerwijk also explained that her team did not study the effects of individual nonpharmacologic therapies.

“We treated them as one,” she said. “Most likely, only some of the therapies that we included are responsible for the effect that we reported, whereas others may have had no effect at all, assuming there’s no other variable that explains our findings.”

Despite these limits, the authors expressed confidence in their research methods and findings.

“Our results suggest that (nonpharmacologic therapies) provided to active-duty service members with chronic pain may reduce their odds of long-term adverse outcomes,” they concluded in the study. “Given known associations of these adverse outcomes with morbidity and mortality, providing (nonpharmacologic therapies) to service members with chronic pain could potentially save lives.”

I’ve been hearing this crashing tidal wave coming. It’s not here yet. But the roar is approaching and it sounds like sweet sweet music to me ears. 

Item #2

I’m going to do everything I can to boil this sucker down and strip it to the bare bones without it getting too long or boring. This one is called “Evidence-based supplements for the enhancement of the athletic performance” by Peeling, et. al(Peeling P 2017). and published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism in 2017. 

The authors wanted to put together a review focusing on the available evidence based for performance supplements commonly used in sports and summarizing the when’s and the how’s around their uses.

The ysay there is robust evidence that the following supplements can enhance sports performance when used according to established protocols. 

So let’s motor through this like poop through a goose, shall we?

  1. Caffeine -There exists a lengthy research history on caffeine supplementation across a range of performance protocols, including endurance-based situations, resistance training exercise, short-term supramaximal efforts, and/or repeat-sprint tasks. Reported benefits of caffeine include benefits include adenosine receptor antagonism, increased endorphin release, enhanced neuromuscular function, improved vigilance and alertness, and a reduced perception of exertion during exercise. Low to moderate doses of caffeine (∼3–6 mg/kg BM), consumed 60 min pre exercise, appear to have the most consistent positive outcomes on sports performance in research situations, although a variety of other protocols (as mentioned above) also appear beneficial, and are practiced in real-life. Of note, athletes who intend to use caffeine as a performance aid should trial their strategies during training or minor competitions, in order to fine-tune a protocol that achieves benefits with minimal side effects.
  2. Creatine – widely-researched supplement, with creatine monohydrate (CM) being the most common form used. Creatine loading can acutely enhance the performance of sports involving repeated high-intensity exercise (e.g., team sports), as well as the chronic outcomes of training programs based on these characteristics (e.g., resistance or interval training), leading to greater gains in lean mass and muscular strength and power. When accepted creatine monohydrate supplementation protocols are followed, the expected increase in intramuscular creatine stores is likely to enhance lean mass, maximal power/strength, and the performance of single and repeated bouts of short-term, high-intensity exercise.
  3. Nitrate –  The authors say Nitrate is a popular supplement initially found to improve oxygen uptake kinetics during prolonged submaximal exercise. Great sources are Leafy green and root vegetables (i.e., spinach, rocket, celery, beetroot, etc.
  4. Beta-Alanine – The paper says this is one of the immediate defenses against the accumulation of protons in the contracting musculature during exercise. I can also tell you that this is just something I never nerded out on. Lol. Not my cup of tea but I like to offer something for everyone here at the Chiropractic Forward Podcast. They say it can improve tolerance for maximal exercise bouts lasting 30 s to 10 min and provide small yet significant benefits in both continuous and intermittent exercise tests. Basically, it’s used in order to augment high-intensity exercise performance ranging from 30 s to 10 min in duration.
  5. Sodium Bicarbonate – benefits are generally seen in short-term, high-intensity sprints lasting ∼60 s in duration, with a diminishing return as the effort duration exceeds ∼10 min. However, greater benefits may be realized (>8% improvement) with a greater number of repeated sprint bouts

Go to our show notes at chiropracticforward.com if you’d like to get dosing information and all the little technical tidbits. It’s really interesting. Even to an orthopedic guy like me although, its technical enough to make my eyes glaze over as well. 

There are several others listed in the paper as well but the authors point out that the evidence for their effectiveness is much less clear. They are Sodium citrate, Phosphates, and Carnitine.

Even though that stuff is not my cup of tea, it’s good to know, it’s good to have as a reference, and it’s good to pass on to you because many of you actually do nerd out on that stuff and thank God for that. That means I can call people like you and ask what the hell. On the other hand, if it’s something I nerd out on like orthopedics, you can call me and say what the hell?

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com

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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

Devitt M (2020). “Nonpharmacologic Therapies Can Improve Chronic Pain Outcomes Reductions in Drug Misuse, Suicide Attempts Reported.” AAFP.

Peeling P, B. M., Paul S, (2017). “Evidence-based supplements for the enhancement of athletic performance.” IntJ sport Nutrition Exercise Metabolism 28(2): 178-187.

What Makes A Good Chiropractor – 9 Characteristics

CF 101: What Makes A Good Chiropractor – 9 Characteristics

Today we’re going to talk about going to a chiropractor and how to tell your out-of-town loved ones how to choose a good one on their own. Without your help even! We’re also going to talk about being the kind of chiropractor that your colleagues are happy to send their family to. 

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products
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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. We’re not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research oh no…. we’re talking about research over beers.

Welcome, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do, like our facebook page, join our private facebook group and interact, and then go to chiropracticforward.com and check out the store link. Sign up for our weekly newsletter there too.

No spam there, just reminders when we post a new episode so you don’t miss any!

You have collapsed into Episode #101

Now if you missed last week’s episode, we covered a lot of research. It was Episode 100 so make sure you don’t miss that info. 

I know there were some good solid knowledge nuggets found there within so make sure you’re up to date and not falling behind the rest. Keep up with the class, man! 

On the personal end of things I cannot tell you what a trying and what an emotional week it’s been. These episodes are recorded a week or two ahead of time so you’ll note the time difference of when this happened and when it’s making its way live. 

On Saturday November 9th, my dad had a stroke. He got out of bed that morning and said he’s got a tall bed so he always has to sort of find his footing before he gets out and walks. He said on this day, he got out of bed and got out a bit awkward and fell. 

He hit his head on the end table and cut his head open. From there, he went to the garage to get rags to clean up the bloody mess. Well, from the garage he goes to talk to his wife in the kitchen and there he falls again….hitting his head once again. 

At this point, his wife calls the ambulance and off to the hospital they go. My wife and I were in Dallas TX, about a 6 hour drive away. So, I get the call. Take care of my business in Dallas and head back to Amarillo as quickly as we can. 

Now, never having been around a stroke victim in the first week or so, I have little experience in this arena. I had no idea what to expect. When we got to the hospital, he was awake and talking to me. Telling me all kinds of stories, basically doing decent but there was weakness on the left side arm and leg. 

Now, here’s where it got A LOT more interesting. On day two in the hospital, after taking a walk on the walker, he was sitting and eating and just relaxing when he had stroke #2. This was the more severe stroke. They put him on heparin, a blood thinner, and took him to the critical care unit to keep a closer eye on everything. 

Now complete loss of sensation and motor in the left leg and arm and hand. He was very out of it and confused in the CCU. 

So that was touch and go for a bit as you can imagine. Very emotional. Very stressful for everyone. Certainly for my dad. 

Now, let’s fast forward to today, Monday November 18th, we are now 9 days out from the first stroke and 7 days out from the second stroke. He’s out of the hospital and in a rehab facility where they are trying to teach him to regain his life if possible. At this point, nobody knows where this train is going to take us and when it will get there but, we are hopeful and we are praying. If this reaches you and you hear it, I would appreciate your prayers, your good vibes, or whatever you are willing to send this way. 

He could use it and, honestly, his family could too. It’s been a challenge to try to see patients and then spend time at the hospital. It’s hard to be present for your patients when your mind is fixated on your personal problems. I’m sure it goes that way for doctors going through divorces and life changing events like that as well. Mine just happens to be my Dad’s stroke. 

So, I’ve usually got at least something to share with you on the personal side of things. This one was a whole new thing for me. I’ll probably giving updates as we go along. 

Before we dive into the reason we’re here, it’s good to support the people that support you don’t you think? Well, ChiroUp certainly supports evidence-based practices. 

If you don’t take advantage of this deal, I just think you might be crazy.

If you’re a regular listener of our podcast, you know I’ve used ChiroUp since about June of 2018. Let me tell you about it because I’m about to give you a way to do a FREE TRIAL and, if you sign up, only pay $99/month for the first six months which is pennies compared to what it’s worth. So listen up!

ChiroUp is changing the way we practice by simplifying patient education and here’s what I mean: 

In a matter of seconds, you can send condition-specific reports to your patients with recommendations for treatment, for their activities of daily living, & for their exercises. 

You can see how this saves you time – no more explaining & re-explaining your patient’s care, because they have access to it at their fingertips. 

You can be confident that your patients are getting the best possible care, because the reports are populated based on what the literature recommends and isn’t that re-assuring? All of that work has been done FOR you. 

There are more than 1000 providers worldwide using ChiroUp to empower their treatments, patients, & practice – Including myself! **Short testimony**

If you don’t know what it’s all about or you’d like to check it out, do yourself a favor and go to Chiroup.com today to get started with your FREE TRIAL – Use code Williams99 to pay only $99/month for your first 6 months

That’s ChiroUp.com and super double secret code Williams99.

Item #1

Now, the reason for this week’s topic: I saw a question on one of the Facebook groups the other day about what are the qualities we look for in other chiropractors before we’ll recommend them to a family member or to a friend. 

Quite honestly, I get phone calls, text messages, Facebook messages, and emails from friends and associates that live out of town asking me if I know a good chiropractor where they live all of the time. Literally almost every week. And if I don’t know one, then what is the best way to choose a chiropractor? I’d say my first knee-jerk response is to go to forwardthinkingchiro.com and check the Member Map they have. 

Now that still doesn’t guarantee it’s the best referral in the world but it’s a damn good start in whittling out the crazies right off the bat. But, that map unfortunately doesn’t represent every area of every city and it certainly doesn’t get you a good referral in BFE, Wyoming. 

So, that’s what we’re talking about here. How do you find someone then if that FTCA map fails us?

I think that any time one decides that they’re going to go to a new doctor….even for you and for me…..If we change doctors, there is a certain amount of apprehension. In choosing a chiropractor, this apprehension can be escalated to a certain extent because all chiropractors are vastly different. In short, there is literally zero standardization. It’s like the wild wild West out there. If you have an ear infection and you go to the ER, you know it’s going to be a pretty standard treatment, right?

Not with chiropractic. You can go in for a little tweak in your back and walk out $3500 lighter with a year long plan. Or you can walk in with a little tweak in your back and get some completely normal, repsonible recommendation. 

There are some chiropractors that focus on weight loss. There are some chiropractors that only use an instrument to adjust rather than manual adjusting. 

There are some chiropractors that are more driven by philosophy than other chiropractors. There are some chiropractors that use therapy and extra equipment, while other chiropractors only adjust.

So let’s dive into 9 characteristics I feel are important in a good chiropractor. 

  1. 1. Honesty 

Other than the first topic and the last topic, I have not put these qualities in any specific order. But I put honesty at the top of the pile because I feel that strongly about it. 

I feel that honesty is of utmost importance in any profession. Especially in the healthcare field. People are literally putting their lives and their livlihoods in our hands. You would like to think our family is putting their lives in the hands of an honest person, don’t you think?

We’ve heard it said time and time again that if a person doesn’t have his word, then he doesn’t have anything. It so so true. 

How do you know if a chiropractor is honest when you first visit their office? That’s a hard one to answer. It may simply be a “gut” sort of thing. But usually, if we trust our “gut”, then we don’t get steered off of the right track.

You may not be able to develop a “gut” feeling until the second or third visit but you will most likely get a good idea by then. I would say that, in general, if it takes 3 visits to get your recommendations and really start treating, they may be using sales tactics on you. 

If they talk about having to see them once a week for a year or for a lifetime, they may not necessarily be dishonest but they are most certainly unaware of current guidelines and evidence-based protocols. 

If they talk about fixing everything in your body based on a subluxation model, I’d say you should save your money and leave. That’s just me. Again, that doesn’t mean dishonesty but it does mean they may not be evidence-based. 

  1. 2.Evidence-based/Evidence Informed 

OK, this one is admittedly a sticky one here. As most chiropractors are well-aware, there is this huge chasm in our profession between those that believe in only adjusting the spine and nothing else and those that are evidence-based or evidence-informed. 

Between those that follow a philosophy and those that follow research. Between those that do not believe in the profession progressing and growing and those that believe our profession can and should grow and expand. 

There are some research papers that the philosophy group will point to saying these papers prove their theories and minimal treatment but, in truth, from what I’ve seen, they are low quality and no profession worth anything would rest their entire reputation on them. 

However, there are TONS of papers, many of which we have covered here on the Chiropractic Forward Podcast, that proves and validates evidence-based chiropractic every day in almost every way. 

In general, it is my recommendation that you BE the chiropractor or refer your family TO the chiropractor that follows research, follows the expanding knowledge within, and pushes to move the profession more and more into the current century. 

  1. 3.Network. 

To me, “Network” means, “how plugged in is the doctor as far as his associations, his colleagues, and the profession as a whole?”

On the surface, that may sound like a silly suggestion and to be somewhat inconsequential to you. But I have found that there is an extreme amount of value in being active with fellow chiropractors and state and national associations. 

We are able to bounce ideas and questions off of each other whereas someone with no colleague interaction or support system merely has their own knowledge and is sort of on an island of their own making.

Trust me, this is coming from a dude that was on that self-made island years and years ago. I had my basic knowledge from going to chiropractic school but I wasn’t particularly skilled in anything extra. Just basic white paint in a world of oranges, purple, fuschia, lilac, or whatever color you can think of. Sitting here today, I wouldn’t send anyone to me then. 

Being active in the Texas Chiropractic Association has allowed me the opportunity to stay plugged in with rules and regulations, new treatments, changes in insurance plans, and options that I would have likely never known about were I not being active in my profession.

  1. 4. Knowledge & Experience of Doctor and Staff

I think this qualification really goes without saying. And again, knowledge and experience is of extreme importance in ANY profession. Even an experienced comedian is usually going put on a better show than a rookie.

For instance, I attend a chiropractic conference one weekend out of every month. Chiropractors are required 16 hours of continuing education every year. Some chiropractors will only go to a continuing education seminar one weekend out of every year. I should know, I used to be one of those chiropractors. 

But with age comes wisdom and the desire for more wisdom. I would do my best to figure out the chiropractor’s knowledge and their level of experience. This could certainly end up being a “gut” thing as we previously discussed but it’s usually something they’re proud of and something they market. 

Trust me, when I finally get that Fellowship of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine, you better believe it’s going to be on the website and will probably look like some sign right out of Las Vegas.

If there’s no sign on the website of extra certification and acheivement, your money is probably best spent elsewhere. I’m ten times the doctor I was when I began the Diplomate program. Or more….exponentially better. 

  1. 5. Good listener 

You’re not going to be able to get this off of a doctor’s website so don’t even try but we can strive to be better ourselves in this department. Myself included. I’ve been at a point where I didn’t feel I could get everyone worked through in one day and I can guarantee you I cut some patients off in the middle of their explanation. 

I think that it is very important that a doctor has a good bedside manner. Meaning, that they need to be able to listen, focus on the patient, and fully understand what the patient is saying and what their concerns are. There are those days where we are just doing everything we can to stay above water but in general, don’t be uninterested and think you have the problem solved before they’ve said anything. 

Open your ears. 

  1. 6. Office Presentation. 

This may seem like a silly one and I’m sorry if it’s just not important to you, but if I am going to a doctor’s office, I expect the office to be mostly clean and fairly sharp looking. 

GASP….what if they went over the top and it looks amazing? 

I think that if a healthcare provider takes pride in their office and in their staff, then they’re going to take pride in their results and their expertise. Maybe I’m wrong. You can find those that don’t give a squat about anything in their office. No good pictures, old this, smelly that..yet they’re able to get the best results. 

Let’s face it though, is that the exception or the rule? I argue it’s the exception.

An an ideal office, they try to have a welcoming feeling, the staff is dressed neatly, there is as little dirt or dust is on the floor and furniture as is possible, there is no trash on the floor next to the trash can, everything is as nice, as sharp, and as clean as possible. 

If the doctor and the staff do not portray an acceptable image, then that may not be the place for you.

  1. 7. A sense of purpose. 

Have you ever gone to a doctor’s office and felt that they were simply going through the motions and collecting money? I have absolutely felt that way a time or two. I think that the better doctor is genuinely concerned about his patients’ well-being, and how he can help them in the best way possible.

Someone that you can just feel is a little extra. Someone that is knowledgeable and can relate things to you in relate-able terms. Not chiropractic jargon. Someone that you can instantly tell is not there to get into your pocket or to max your insurance. You know what I’m talking about. Someone that is there to get you results as quickly as possible. That’s purpose. 

Even on top of that though, it would be nice to find a chiropractor that you felt had the community’s best interests in mind. When you see them donating and giving back to their community, why wouldn’t you want to do business with that person instead of a taker. Takers kind of suck. Takers just make profit but are narcissistic. They don’t get involved with their state or national associations at all. They don’t give anything back to their profession, their school, or their community. 

They take that money and spend it only on themselves because that’s all they care about. I don’t want to do business with that person. I want to do business with a giver. Any day all day. Gimme a giver. Thank you, i’ll have another please. 

I want a chiropractor that got into the profession of chiropractic in order to heal people. And to heal as many people as he could possibly reach. 

Someone that thinks and works on a higher level rather than someone that just shows up to work and does their job. A doctor that is excited and jazzed to be doing what they’re doing in the place where they are doing it. 

THAT’S the guy I want to go to!

  1. 8. Know when to refer. 

Tell me you know when to refer. Tell me you don’t think you can fix everything. Please tell me!!

When we talk about referrals, we can get way off track in the chiropractic profession. Some chiropractors feel they can solve any problem walking through their doors. Ear infection? Pop ya bones? Asthma? Pop ya bones. Cancer? Pop ya bones. Diverticulitis? Pop ya bones? 

You know the ones. Yeah you know them. They’re the reason people in the medical field look at all of us like we’re crazy. And if that’s the measuring stick for crazy, then they’re right. Fortunately, most of aren’t like that. But the loud minority is still winning the day in our profession I’m afraid. 

As I said before, I am interested in the chiropractor that is plugged in to his profession and to his colleagues. I’m interested in the chiropractor that is plugged in to the healthcare field as a whole. And I’m damn sure interested in the chiropractor who is plugged into research and current, accepted guidelines. 

If a doctor gives me a sense that they feel that they are the only one that can handle any condition, or that there is never any need to look outside of their office for additional help, then I am likely going to find another chiropractor. I think it is extremely important to go to a chiropractor that is not afraid to admit when additional treatment should be reasonably looked at.

I for one, look forward to each and every time that I have the opportunity to work in conjunction with a medical provider. I feel that it is a very complete treatment plan when you are able to address all symptoms thoroughly.

Patients have to take into consideration whether they  want a chiropractor that is deeply versed in chiropractic philosophy or want a chiropractor that is open to working with the medical community. 

  1. 9. Love. 

I like to throw curveballs here and there. I like to add things you don’t see in most lists. This is one of those things and I saved this one for last because I hope that, after you’re done reading this, this is the one that will resonate the longest with you. 

I strongly feel that when you visit a health care provider,  things like caring, genuineness, focus, listening, and all of those other things that we’ve talked about above…..they can all be wrapped up into one thing. 

And I think that that one thing is love. If the doctor and the staff love what they do, they love their patients, and they love being where they are, when they are there, then people can feel that.

If you walk into an office and it’s cold, there’s no personality, and it feels stiff and stale, then that’s just no fun at all. Where’s the love? How do you show it to your patients? 

I want an office that I love to go to and if the doctor and the staff have love as the primary driver of their office and their purpose and it’s something palpable that you can feel….., then I think that all of the other eight qualifications pretty much take care of themselves.

That’s it. I’m sure if I didn’t have so much on my plate I could come up with about 20 more things that are important. Maybe a 100 but I have to get to the hospital to see my dad. 

I enjoyed sitting and throwing some random thoughts on the page. I hope you liked it and make sure you come back next week. 

Our podcasts post every Thursday. Typically in the morning unless I’

Store

Part of making your life easier is having the right patient education tools in your office. Tools that educate based on solid, researched information. We offer you that. It’s done for you. We are taking pre-orders right now for our brand new, evidence-based office brochures available at chiropracticforward.com. Just click the STORE link at the top right of the home page and you’ll be off and running. Just shoot me an email at [email protected] if something is out of sorts or isn’t working correctly. 

If you’re like me, you get tired of answering the same old questions. Well, these brochures make great ways of educating while saving yourself time and breath. They’re also great for putting in take-home folders. 

Go check them out at chiropracticforward.com under the store link. While you’re there, sign up for the newsletter won’t you? We won’t spam you. Just one email per week to remind you when the new episode comes out. That’s it. 

Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

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Player FM Link

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TuneIn

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Big Ideas On Marketing Evidence-Based Practices (Part Two)

CF 099: Big Ideas On Marketing Evidence-Based Practices (Part Two)

Today, you’re going to hear Part Two of our two-part series about marketing. Specifically, marketing an evidence-based chiropractic practice. How do you do it and do it right?

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. We’re not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. It’s like we’re talking about research over beers. Which is NOT like talking about research in a classroom or an institution of some sort. Accessible research if you will. I could be more professional but I’m not. 

Welcome, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast. 

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do, like our facebook page, and go to our Store link at chiropracticforward.com and check out the goods. That’s it. Not bad right?

You have shimmied into Episode #99 and I hope you’re enjoying the Marketing series. 

Now, if you missed last week’s episode, it was Part I of this marketing an evidence-informed practice series. Stop now and go back and listen to Part I first. Then come back here and devour Part II. 

Because….make no mistake…..we’re serving it up hot and fresh here people. 

On a personal note, nothing special is going on around the office or in my work life balance. It’s just been business as usual. We’ve had a bit of a fall off from the Summer but it’s still busier than this time last year and we’re staying busy busy busy. 

So, nothing of signifigance to report here but, before we get too deep, it’s good to support the people that support you don’t you think? Well, ChiroUp certainly supports evidence-based practices. 

If you don’t take advantage of this deal, I just think you might be crazy.

If you’re a regular listener of our podcast, you know I’ve used ChiroUp since about June of 2018. Let me tell you about it because I’m about to give you a way to do a FREE TRIAL and, if you sign up, only pay $99/month for the first six months which is pennies compared to what it’s worth. So listen up!

ChiroUp is changing the way we practice by simplifying patient education and here’s what I mean: 

In a matter of seconds, you can send condition-specific reports to your patients with recommendations for treatment, for their activities of daily living, & for their exercises. 

You can see how this saves you time – no more explaining & re-explaining your patient’s care, because they have access to it at their fingertips. 

You can be confident that your patients are getting the best possible care, because the reports are populated based on what the literature recommends and isn’t that re-assuring? All of that work has been done FOR you. 

There are more than 1000 providers worldwide using ChiroUp to empower their treatments, patients, & practice – Including myself! **Short testimony**

If you don’t know what it’s all about or you’d like to check it out, do yourself a favor and go to Chiroup.com today to get started with your FREE TRIAL – Use code Williams99 to pay only $99/month for your first 6 months

That’s ChiroUp.com and super double secret code Williams99.

OK….now, back to Part II of our marketing series. We covered some general marketing thoughts and we covered internal marketing last week. We were just about to get into External Marketing and the idea of the first big three means of external marketing which can be thought of as shotgun marketing. 

So, let’s pick back up where we left off last week. Here we go. 

#2 External Marketing

Now, let’s move on to External Marketing. This is the traditional marketing we think of. Things like:

  • TV
  • Radio
  • Billboards

Let’s talk about those three first. We can call that shotgun marketing because you are hitting random people with random pebbles. You can’t laser focus marketing with a cannonball this way. You can only hope that someone that would be interested in you happens to see your message. Some will. Most probably won’t. 

Don’t worry if you’ve fallen for some of this crap. I spent $19k one year to have the front page corner of the yellow pages. Now, that was years ago when everyone actually used the yellow pages but, trust me, I’ve done stupid crap too. 

Back to TV, no matter how smooth the sales reps are, more and more are unplugging. They’re using streaming services like Netflix or Amazon. Disney and Apple are jumping in with both feet too so sooner rather than later, I think the majority will not see a message on traditional TV. 

Same goes for radio. Hello, every heard of Sirius radio? Or, if you’re like me, I’m listening to a podcast as soon as I get in my truck to go anywhere. I don’t even listen to traditional radio anymore. If you do, I think you’re quickly becoming the minority. 

Billboards may make sense if you’re right off the highway and it leads people to your front door. Otherwise, I think it’s probably mostly a waste of money. Don’t get too tied up in whether or not you see your face or your name up on a big board or up on TV. It’s not real. It didn’t happen organically because you’re awesome. You put it there with your money. And you may have just wasted that money. 

Shotgun marketing can make sense but only after all of the base coat has been painted and now you’re just going for exposure and saturation of the market. I really don’t care what the sales reps say and how many graphs they show you. Those are manipulated to take your money. 

Another negative about shotgun marketing is that it is hard to track. Marketing needs to be traced and tracked. Either through computerized means or on a simple spreadsheet. Better believe I know where every single new patient comes from, who to thank, and where my bread and butter lies. 

Unless you’re really tracking well, many times you won’t know if someone comes in from a billboard, TV, or radio. Sometimes they’ll tell you straight up but sometimes they just don’t remember. 

But what about other means of external marketing?

What about things like:

  • BNI
  • Chamber of Commerce
  • Charity and philanthropy. 
  • Social Media
  • Sponsoring teams and events
  • If you want to do personal injury, wouldn’t you figure out how to attract and market that demographic?
  • If you wanted more pain patients, where do they hang out? Where do they go? Wouldn’t you want to figure out how and who to market for those people?
  • Direct mail – yes, it can still work and you can target it like a laser
  • Brochures
  • Marketing representative
  • Creating authority – talks, appearances, book, podcast, content creation, etc…

I have so much on external marketing. The options are endless and we could talk about them for ever. I’ve tried them all. Trust me. 

Something I forgot to mention in the beginning is the fact that marketing is always changing. It’s not a set it and forget it endeavor. You have to be on it all of the time. Yellow Pages anyone? Hello….Bueller. 

#3 Who You Are

As I said before I add this third one because we are in a personal business. You’re not a big brand like Coca Cola. Coca Cola doesn’t have a face. It doesn’t have a name behind the brand. While some would argue that it does, in the context I mean it in, Coca Cola does not have a personality and it damn sure doesn’t have a relationship with it’s drinkers. 

You could say that #3 really has more to do with internal marketing but I think it’s a cross-over thing. Who you are, your vibe, how you carry yourself….that all goes into making your business what it is and makes your reputation what it is. 

For a smaller community, this is even more vital. For a city, still vital. You are attracting people or you are repelling them. It’s not very often that you have not effect or neutral effect on people. Right? Do you ever leave a conversation or a personal encounter with someone with absolutely zero feel about it? You get the point. 

So, what if you spent on average $150 per each new patient that gets on your schedule? There are some pretty good stats you can keep on this stuff. What if you invested $150, they come to your door, you’re having a bad day, rush through their exam, are a bit of a jerk about them doing exactly what you recommend, and then maybe there’s a snafu at the front desk when they pay out because you were too lazy to get the staff trained appropriately?

You may have made the $150 back up but you’re probably not going to profit on that patient because of YOU. Your vibe was crap. You didn’t want to be there. You didn’t want that patient there. You didn’t train your front desk right. And now YOU probably won’t have another visit with that patient. 

What if you are at an event, you woke up that morning and stepped in dog crap, and that just set the tone for the day. Now you’re at this event you don’t really feel like being at and everyone can tell. Mr. Sourpuss chiropractor over there sucking on a whiskey sour with his sour face. 

These are dumb simple little examples but who you are, how you are able to talk and communicate to people, and communicate what you do can make all of the difference in the world. If you’re positive, energetic, smart, and capable…..Boom. The battle is won. 

Eyore from Winnie The Poo on the other hand gets no patients. Only your mom is coming to see you. #66 in town, #1 in mama’s heart. 

More than personality though, you MUST be a real person. Don’t pretend. Don’t sell. Patients smell that garbage a mile away. Be AUTHENTIC. That’s a key concept in marketing. 

It’s the stuff you learned in kindergarten. Treat others the way you want to be treated. Honesty, ethics, forthright, stand up, and gentlemanly or lady like. Professional. These are so important. What about loving? Of course. You better love your patients and you better love your staff. 

Our practices are made up of lots of relationships and if you aren’t interested in people and relationship building, I’m afraid no amount of marketing will make it OK or will make you succeed. No amount of money. 

When you’re providing quality care with responsible recommendations, and you salt and pepper that delicious brew with a little love and personality, you got a winning recipe on your hands. I like cajun food so I add even more personality to my spicey brew!!

Boom snap pow!

I mentioned this earlier but, I think the biggest key to anything business related is keeping and tracking stats effectively. Do you know the exact number of new patients you got last month from Google or Facebook or Instagram or from referrals from your existing patients? Do you know how many new patients you got from your own staff referring people to you?

Do you know your PVA? Do you know how much you make per patient encounter on average and how much it costs you in marketing dollars to get a new patient in your doors? Do you know what your average profit per patient visit is each month or what it averages over the course of the year?

If you can’t answer these questions, you have to figure out how to answer them and you need to do it yesterday if you get my drift. 

These numbers and metrics aren’t only important to your marketing efforts. They’re important to your business in general. How can you possibly know your return on investment for anything you do in your business? It sounds crazy to say it, right? For so many of us, record keeping and stats are just second nature. But, I wasn’t always there. I had no idea where I’d been and not a clue where I was going.

I was like a drunk pin balling off of the walls trying to get somewhere and falling down every so often. 

I’m not just trying to relate to you on some level. That’s real talk. I was on an island for so many years. No colleagues to bounce ideas off of or to ask for help. No association involvement, no network. No real continuing education. I came late to the party. But, with knowing I was coming late to the party, I jumped in with both feet, man. 

Gimme the bottle of tequila, the bottle of vodka, and throw in some fireball on top of that. Let’s get there as fast as possible. 

That’s what I did with being a chiropractor. 

Now, as far as the stats keeping, I’m working on a solution for those of you that might be interested in getting some help with keeping stats. Something that will make it easy and fast. Yes, it’ll have a monthly cost but it won’t be ridiculous and you can only pay for what you think you need. Different levels…that type of deal. But, it’s in the works and I’ll let you know more about it when we get it up and running. You numbers nerds will love it. 

Some other random thoughts and musings:

  • Having something to talk about is always important. Especially on social media. If you’re talking, people are typically listening. Even when you think they aren’t
  • Make sure your website is doing what it’s supposed to do for you. IF you can’t do it, hire it out. It really is that important. 
  • IF you can learn YouTube videos, learn it and do it. Even if you think you suck on screen. It’s important. 
  • Eliminate the risk. Do what you can to remove any and all obstacles to coming to see you. Is your insurance staff making the payment process a little bumpy? Fix it. Are people wanting to fill out paper work online but you don’t have that? Fix it. Does the majority of your population want to come in from 5-6 and you’re closed at 5? Fix it. Not for just one or two people but if the majority needs that time block, give it to them. Just remove the obstacles. 
  • Be the expert that you are and be the expert everywhere your market will allow you to be the expert. Clubs, associations, boards, etc…
  • The secret to referrals is the difference between satisfaction and enthusiasm. 

Things NOT to do pretty please for the love of all that’s holy. 

  • Do not put your office and profits above your patients for any reason ever. 
  • Do not scare patients into care. It’s rude and it’s unethical
  • Do not use curve correction as a reason to manipulate patients into setting up 70 visits. It’s rude, it’s borderline unethical, it makes all of us look bad, your actions really do reflect on the rest of us, and there’s no good, non-biased research backing the notion that curve correction matters at all. 
  • Don’t do dinner with the doctor unless you truly are simply trying to build authority in your community. If you are using them as bait and switches where you get someone in for a $29 initial treatment and then scare the crap out of them to make them sign a contract for $3500 over the course of a year, then YOU are the problem with this profession. 
  • Oh yeah, contracts between doctors and patients do not belong in healthcare. It’s embarrassing. Please stop if you do it and never start if you don’t. 

Just be honest, ethical, put the patient first, behave in a manner that would make the chiropractor next door be proud to be a chiropractor, and take care of your patients by following industry standards for treatment. Keep learning and expanding your knowledge. Be the smartest in your town. The more real, research-backed education you get the better you’ll understand things in the profession and the better you’ll understand how to carry yourself. CCSP, Diplomates, etc. 

Basically, have a moral compass which sums it up.  

So, there’s the quick form of a marketing seminar.  We could spend an hour on each one of these little nuances to marketing and could go on and on and on. 

Again, if any of you want me to put together a more robust marketing talk and have me present it for your group or association, let me know and we can see how we can make it work. 

If you have any questions or ideas, shoot me an email at [email protected]

I hope you’ve enjoyed my marketing talk. I literally sat down and just started typing. Yes, I’m sure I didn’t cover everything as thoroughly as you’d like but, if you’re really paying attention, I gave you some good solid cement to build a base out of. 

Key Takeaways

  • Have a USP
  • Have a marketing meeting regularly
  • Set goals
  • Be honest, ethical, loving, authentic, and don’t sell people
  • Don’t push people and scare care is crap care. 
  • If it takes you 100 visits to help someone, you could get better at what you do
  • Internal marketing means as much as external marketing which means as much as who you are and how you communicate and carry yourself. 
  • Track EVERYTHING

Store

I will hopefully have something in place to help you track metrics soon enough. Also Part of making your life easier is having the right patient education tools in your office. Tools that educate based on solid, researched information. We offer you that. It’s done for you. We are taking pre-orders right now for our brand new, evidence-based office brochures available at chiropracticforward.com. Just click the STORE link at the top right of the home page and you’ll be off and running. Just shoot me an email at [email protected] if something is out of sorts or isn’t working correctly. 

If you’re like me, you get tired of answering the same old questions. Well, these brochures make great ways of educating while saving yourself time and breath. They’re also great for putting in take-home folders. 

Go check them out at chiropracticforward.com under the store link. While you’re there, sign up for the newsletter won’t you? We won’t spam you. Just one email per week to remind you when the new episode comes out. That’s it. 

Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
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This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

w/ Dr. David Graber (Part Two) – Chiropractic Technique, Chiropractic Gurus, Teaching

CF 077: w/ Dr. David Graber (Part Two) – Chiropractic Technique, Chiropractic Gurus, Teaching

Today we’re going to be talking with Dr. David Graber from New Jersey. Parsippany, NJ to be specific. 

But first, here’s that bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors
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OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

Introduction

We’re here to advocate for chiropractic while we also make your life easier using research and some good solid common sense and smart talk. 

Store

Part of making your life easier is having the right patient education tools in your office. Tools that educate based on solid, researched information. We offer you that. It’s done for you. We are taking pre-orders right now for our brand new, evidence-based office brochures available at chiropracticforward.com. Just click the STORE link at the top right of the home page and you’ll be off and running. Just shoot me an email at [email protected] if something is out of sorts or isn’t working correctly. 

If you’re like me, you get tired of answering the same old questions. Well, these brochures make great ways of educating while saving yourself time and breath. They’re also great for putting in take-home folders. 

Go check them out at chiropracticforward.com under the store link. While you’re there, sign up for the newsletter won’t you? We won’t spam you. Just one email per week to remind you when the new episode comes out. That’s it. 

F4CP

We will be launching an athletes and opioids eBook toward the end of this month. It’s called A case for chiropractic disrupting the cycle of pain, prescriptions, and addiciton. I’m linking it in the show notes so go get and check it out. 

https://www.f4cp.org/package/home/viewfile/whiathletes-and-opioids-ebook

DACO

Let’s talk a bit about the DACO program

Let’s get to our guest today. As I mentioned at the top of the show, we have Dr. DavidCF ep. 76 Graber with us today. 

  • Dr. Graber graduated from New York Chiropractic College in 1985 and got his Sports Diplomate in 1996. 
  • He is a fromer NYCC assistant instructor of diagnosis and technique. 
  • He developed and taught over 20 different post-graduate courses in Chiropractic technique and theory, and rehabilitation. 
  • He was voted chiropractor of the year in 2012 by the Association of New Jersey Chiropractors
  • He is the charman of the ANJC council on technique and clinical excellence. 
  • And he’s here with us today. 
  1. I can’t think of anyone better than you to ask this question of. I see so many polar opinions concerning this: with the rising popularity of the YouTube folks like Cipriano and Gregory Johnson, AKA – Ring Dinger – what is you opinion of the Y-axis adjustment? Is it as dangerous as some think?
  2. You were a speaker at Parker Vegas this year so some of our listeners may be already very aware of you. Tell me a little about your presentation and the whole experience. I saw a lot of very positive vibes on Facebook coming from evidence-based chiropractors. 
  3. You have been teaching chiropractors for some time now. One of the power points I have is called Contextual healing in Chiropractic: The Roles of Placebo, Nocebo, and Intension. I’m not too proud to admit that there is information here that I’m not 100% up on. It looks fascinating. Can you give us a summary of what is in the course. The big ideas essentially. 
  4. You are very visible in the evidence-based facebook groups like the Chiropractic Practice Research group and the Forward Thinking Chiropractic Alliance and others that are very similar in regard to being based on science and evidence-based practice. You are particularly prolific in posting research papers of all kinds. First, where do you typically get your research? Secondly, what avenue of research seems to be your area of the most interest?
  5. You say that Evidence-based Chiropractic doesn’t exist in actual practice. OK, what you talkin’ ‘bout, Willis?
  6. I have to give you some serious props. Going through your power point from Parker Vegas….let’s just say that I just finished 300 hours of education to sit for the DACO testing to get the Diplomate for Orthopedics. So much of what we learned in that course, you are already on top of. It’s already in this power point. Things like downregulation of central faciliatation, vestibular effects, neuroplasticity, mechanoreceptor stimulation, release of entrapped synovial folds of the facet joints – I know where I learned all of this stuff. Assuming you haven’t gone through the DACO yet, where did you pick it up? Was it the Sports Diplomate?
  7. When you discuss some of the unsupported and ‘Unfavorable’ testing like manual muscle testing, paraspinal skin temperature readings, surface EMG, or x-rays to localize a site of care…..how much push back do you typically encounter and how do you go about handling that? We both know there are people that will argue these things until their last breath. 
  8. Tell me…..how does one practice non-subluxation based Chiropractic that’s not considered the same thing as a PT
  9. I wrote an article for my blog at one time called “Back Alignment: Useful Terminology Or Outdated Idea?” I noticed one of your slides that made me want to jump and cheer because we are definitly on the same page. It said “Adjustments Improve Motion, Not Alignment.” I’d love for chiropractors to hear more on* that. Can I get you to elaborate briefly on that for us? 
  10. 10.When it comes to what we do as chiropractors, in general, it can be a concept, a therapy we’re not utilizing….whatever you think…..but, what is the biggest thing we are missing as a profession? From our email exchanges, it may have to do with just getting better at what we do?
  11. 11.I’ve heard chiropractic in New York is not so good but do not know specifics on that. Being right next door to New York, can you tell me about chiropractic in New Jersey? What are your State Association’s battles?
  12. 12.After going through your Parker Vegas power point, you have a fan in me. Where will you be in the future? How do we keep up with you and hopefully catch you at a seminar and hear all of this awesome information?
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors
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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

British Medical Journal Research, Surgeons Against Back Surgery, and Pediatric Chiropractic Under Attack

CF 068: British Medical Journal Research, Surgeons Against Back Surgery, and Pediatric Chiropractic Under Attack

Today we’re going to talk about a BIG new study helping us out in the British Medical Journal, we’ll talk about spinal surgeons against back surgery, and we’ll talk about pediatric chiropractic under attack. That’s a big topic right now. Especially down in Australia. 

But first, get ready to shake your tail feathers……here’s that bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
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OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have done the mashed potato right into Episode #68. Just like we were back in the 50’s. Sometimes I wonder if I was born in the wrong generation. Seriously. Speaking of, if you’d like to hear what we listen to in my office all day every day, go to Spotify and get my Old, New, Memphis & Motown Too. My profile is amarillopacc. That’s the amarillo platypus, absinthe, crustacean, crap ton. 

You’re welcome…. I’m here all week. Tip your waitresses. 

Introduction

Now, we’re here to advocate for chiropractic while we also make your life easier. 

Part of that is having the right patient education tools in your office. Tools that educate based on solid, researched information. We offer you that. It’s done for you. We are taking pre-orders right now for our brand new, evidence-based office brochures available at chiropracticforward.com. Just click the STORE link at the top right of the home page and you’ll be off and running. Just shoot me an email at [email protected] if something is out of sorts or isn’t working correctly. 

If you’re like me, you get tired of answering the same old questions. Well, these brochures make great ways of educating while saving yourself time and breath. They’re also great for putting in take-home folders. 

Go check them out at chiropracticforward.com under the store link. While you’re there, sign up for the newsletter won’t you? We won’t spam you. Just one email per week to remind you when the new episode comes out. That’s it. 

DACO

Let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. I went on a short little spring break vacay last week so didn’t get many hours in. I got three hours I believe. The class I took was Class 3 of the Pain In The Frame series. It was over chronic shoulder pain. I have to tell you that the neurology is not something that comes naturally to me but, in the same breath, I want you to know that it is presented in a way that is finally understandable. Even by me and when it comes to hardcore neuro topics, that’s saying a lot, folks. Seriously.

And the concept is repeated repeatedly. That sounds redundant but I know you’re pickin up what I’m throwin down here. 

Dr. Anthony Nicholson who is part of the team that has set up the educational program, and who will also be a guest in the very near future here with us on the podcast, he was a neuro diplomate before getting his DACO so there is plenty of neuro but don’t let that scare you. Had I known that going in, it probably would have scared me a touch but, it’s no biggie. It’s explained very well and though I didn’t completely grasp it the first time or two it was run by me, I got by the 10th time for sure. Lol. 

I’m a slow learner. Lol. I beat myself up. I’m almost done with the whole thing and I have a 95 in the class. Trust me, I’m not a neuro guy. I hate hardcore neuro but it’s excellent stuff that you need to know and if I can do it, I promise you can too. 

Be looking for that interview with Dr. Nicholson all the way from Australia in just a couple of weeks or so.  Maybe sooner. He’s fascinating. 

Personal Happenings

If you hear something here that you really like and would like it in written form rather than spoken, just hop onto  chiropracticforward.com, find the episode, and just scroll down to copy and paste it. If you’re using it for content or on your website for some reason, just be cool and give us some credit please. I’d sure appreciate it and I’m sure the researchers we discuss would too. 

Item #1

Onward we march to the first item here. It’s a biggie and it’s brand new. It’s called “Benefits and harms of spinal manipulative therapy for the treatment of chronic low back pain: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials” and authored by Sidney Rubinstein, Annemarie de Zoete, Marienke van Middelkoop, and a herd of others[1]. It was published in the British Medical Journal on March 13th of 2019.  

Hot stuff coming through

The first thing I’ll say here is that there is a pyramid of research hierarchy out there. I’ll post it in the show notes at www.chiropracticforward.com episode #68 so go check it out.

If you look at it, you’ll see that randomized controlled trials and systematic review/meta-analysis studies are at the very top of the hierarchy. 

Well, this paper, for example, as the title says, is a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. See what I’m saying here? That’s why it’s a biggie. 

Why They Did It

They wanted to assess the benefits and harms of spinal manipulative therapy for the treatment of chronic low back pain. Ah….low back gets all the attention. Still waiting to see them get those cervical pain studies rolling. Anywhoo…..

They did a systematic review on 47 randomized controlled trials including 9,211 participants that all examined the effect of spinal manipulation or mobilization in adults over 18 years old with chronic low back pain with or without referred pain. They did not accept the studies that looked at sciatica exclusively.

What They Found

  • Moderate quality evidence suggests that spinal manipulative therapy has similar effects to other recommended therapies for short term pain relief.
  • The same quality evidence suggests a small, clinically better improvement in function. 
  • High quality evidence suggested that , compared with non-recommended therapies, SMT results in small, not clinically better effects for short term pain relief and small to moderate clinically better improvement in function. 
  • They say about half of the studies examined adverse and serious adverse events. They say most of the observed adverse events were musculoskeletal related, transient in nature, and of mile to moderate severity. 

They concluded, “SMT produces similar effects to recommended therapies for chronic low back pain, whereas SMT seems to be better than non-recommended interventions for improvement in function in the short term. Clinicians should inform their patients of the potential risks of adverse events associated with SMT.”

I have to say, when we dive a bit deeper in, while the study shines brightly on spinal manipulative therapy and its practitioners, we as chiropractors can’t lean on this thing completely for the good OR the bad. That’s because, of the 47 randomized controlled trials accepted, chiropractors were the practitioners delivering the manipulative therapy in only 16 of them. Fourteen were delivered by a PT, 6 by a medical manipulator (whatever the hell that is), 5 by a DO, 2 by a bonesetter…(that’s a real thing?) and on and on. 

So, keep that in mind. This isn’t fully representative of what chiropractors do and how effective we can be. 

Also, the techniques used in the 47 studies ranged from high velocity, low amplitude like a Diversified adjustment, to low velocity, low amplitude passive movement techniques or a combination of both of those. 

Again, not entirely representative of what we chiropractors that move the bones do. In my opinion. 

What they say down deep in the paper that, considering recent systematic reviews and information showing that SMT and massage should be considered cost-effective options for low back pain and then this study showing the effectiveness…..basically….what are we waiting for to get this rocking and rolling. OK, not their words exactly but….yeah, I said that but I said it based on their research speak. 

I am including an infographic the authors generated on this that cuts to the chase and may be something you can use for your waiting room. Go check it out. 

Great paper, very impactful, and it supersedes the recommendations that you heard us talking about from The Lancet Medical Journal back in episodes #16, 17, and 18 of this podcast. 

I’ve said it so many times and it remains a true, considering the forces and powers that have been against us for generations, if we were inherently wrong in what we do, we would have been wiped off the face of the Earth years and years ago. Yet we persist. It is my opinion that we do not persist because of creative sales, influential legislation, and millions and billions in lobbying efforts. It’s because we are right in what we do on the most basic levels. 

Item #2

Our second item this week is an interesting article I came across from painchats.com called “This Spine Surgeon says Avoid Spinal Surgery for Low Back Pain: Stop and Think Carefully about Back Surgery.” the article is written by David Hanscom, MD and linked in our show notes for episode 68 at chiropracticforward.com[2].

His actual website is https://backincontrol.com but this article was in painchats.com.

The article starts off with this, “If you’re considering having spinal surgery as the final fix for your back pain, I’d like to help you to think again about your options.

I’m a spinal surgeon and I want you to know that surgery is not your best option for recovery from low back pain.

Surgery for relieving back pain has never been shown to be effective in a stringent research study. The most careful research paper published in 2006 demonstrated that only 22% of patients were satisfied with the outcomes two years later. Essentially, all research shows consistently poor outcomes for fusion surgery performed for back pain.”

Well….all I have to say is….HALLELUJAH!!!

We are going to look back at x-rays of fusions in 10-15 years and wonder what in the hell the surgeons were thinking. Mark my words people. 

He breaks it down into reasons. I will shorten the article but please, go read the whole thing. It’s really good and makes so much sense. 

Reason #1: Fusion back surgery doesn’t help pain. I love everything about this section but in particular this quote, “We also know that disc degeneration, ruptured discs, bulging discs, arthritis, and narrowed discs have been clearly shown to NOT be the source of chronic back pain.” Thank you for some common sense, man! 

Reason #2: Increased risk of more pain after back surgery. Obviously, people having spinal back surgery want less pain so you can easily see the issue here. He says if you’re already having chronic pain elsewhere, totally unrelated to the surgical issue, you are going to develop chronic pain at the new surgical site up to 60% of the time. 

Day-um… But that ties in so nicely with the neurology I’ve learned in the DACO program. When your CNS is already hyper sensitized or up-regulated, it makes sense that new insult is going to behave this way. He also says that re-operation rates within the first year are as high as 20%. Aren’t you just ecstatic that we don’t have to deal with patients that have had failed spinal surgery from day to day in our offices? Good Lord, the surgeons can have it. I don’t want it. 

Reason #3: Other treatment options are more effective. Praise the Lord and Hallelujah once again. He ties in the new finding in neurology for chronic pain. The stuff I’ve been talking about in the DACO program. He says, “Your brain memorizes pain just like an athlete, artist, or musician learns his or her skill.”

The best example is that of phantom limb pain. There is no limb, yet, the pain persists, right? I’m hoping that in your mind you just agreed with me and said, “Right,” to yourself. 

He says that once a patient understands the neurological nature of chronic pain, it becomes solvable and the key is to shift off the painful and unpleasant circuits onto functional and enjoyable ones or create detours around them. Basically re-wiring the brain to an extent. 

I can’t encourage you all enough to go read this article. Again, I’ve linked it in the show notes so go check it. 

Item #3: Chiropractic used for in infants and pediatrics has become quite the hot topic recently. Especially with the government in Australia looking at restricting any chiropractic treatment to the point where it may not be able to be utilized in patients under the age of 12 years old if I remember correctly. 

In addition, this is expected to be spreading. If my information is correct, it’s already looking to head that way in British Columbia as well as Ontario. So, it’s worth paying attention to. 

My first advice would be this: If you want to film your adjustments and put them on the interwebs, then go for it but, when it comes to hanging newborns upside down and performing manipulations on them that make them cry out and things of that nature…..I would encourage you to do your fellow pediatric chiropractors a favor and NOT put those videos on the internet. 

Not because I think you’re wrong. I don’t mess with babies myself but that’s because I’m not trained in it and am honestly uncomfortable with it. But that doesn’t mean I think it’s wrong either. Regardless, it’s not about right or wrong as much as it is perception. Particularly the perception by people that don’t know anything about or don’t understand chiropractic at all. Especially those ignorant but then also in a seat of power and influence. 

Just don’t freaking do it, OK? That’s what I’m saying. 

With all that in mind let’s get going with this one called “Manual therapy for the pediatric population: a systematic review” authored by Carol Prevost, Brian Gleberzon, Beth Carleo, and others[3]. It was published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine on 24 of July 2018. Remember the research hierarchy pyramid and remember that this is a systematic review of 50 studies. 

What They Found

Moderate-positive overall assessment was found for 3 conditions: low back pain, pulled elbow, and premature infants. Inconclusive unfavorable outcomes were found for 2 conditions: scoliosis (OMT) and torticollis (MT). All other condition’s overall assessments were either inconclusive favorable or unclear. Adverse events were uncommonly reported. More robust clinical trials in this area of healthcare are needed.

This one is called “Utilization of Chiropractic Care in US Children and Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Study of the 2012 National Health Interview Survey” authored by Dr. Trent Peng, et. al[4]. Dr. Peng is also a member of our Chiropractic Forward private group on Facebook. Congratulations Dr. Peng!

Why They Did It

The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of chiropractic utilization and examine sociodemographic characteristics associated with utilization in a representative sample of US children and adolescents aged 4 to 17 years.

How They Did It

They analyzed data from 9,734 respondents to the 2012 National Health Interview Survey and chiropractic utilization in the past 12 months was the targeted outcome. 

What they found

They found that

  • The 12-month prevalence of chiropractic utilization in US children was 3.0%
  • The adjusted odds (95% confidence interval) of chiropractic utilization were higher among 11- to 17-year-olds

That’s just to give you an idea of how underserved the younger population is

Last thing, it’s  titled, “Change in young people’s spine pain following chiropractic care at a publicly funded healthcare facility in Canada” authored by Christian Manansala, Steven Passmore, Katie Pohlman[5], and others and published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice online on March 16, 2019. 

Hot stuff, coming up. 

That’s five articles this week. We are getting some serious schooling here right? The reason for this one was knowing that spinal pain in young people has been established as a risk factor for pain later in life, and considering the fact that recent guidelines recommend spinal manipulation and other modalities for back pain, the authors wanted to begin exploring the response to chiropractic treatment in young people with spinal pain. 

We already know it helps all of us old people but what about the kids?

The study utilized a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected quality assurance data attained from the Mount Carmel Clinic chiropractic program database. 

What they found

Young people 10-24 years old showed statistically and clinically significant improvement on the numeric scale in all four spinal regions following chiropractic management. 

The official conclusions reads as follows, “The findings of the present study provide evidence that a pragmatic course of chiropractic care, including SM, mobilization, soft tissue therapy, acupuncture, and other modalities within the chiropractic scope of practice are a viable conservative pain management treatment option for young people.”

Of course. For us that’s a duh sort of thing but, until it is written in research, you can’t treat it as a duh thing. While we think it’s an obvious conclusion, it’s not so obvious to others so thanks to these fine folks for doing the hard work and allowing all of us to stand on the shoulders of your efforts. 

This week, I want you to go forward with:

  • Big time research in medical journals keep proving you made the right decision to be a chiropractor. I know you didn’t need that validation personally but professionally, it’s a hell of a nice thing to have in our back pockets. 
  • Chronic back pain will never be cured by a surgery-first mentality and we knew that. But, our central nervous system plays as much a part in the resolution of pain as any mechanical factor plays a part in it. 
  • Pediatrics is under attack. Stop filming what you do. You’re not wrong but perception plays as much a part in the problems pediatric chiropractors are having as does any thing else. We get results in kids too but, if you don’t watch it, it’ll get taken away. Be smart. 
Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

1. Rubinstein S, d.Z.A., van Middlekoop M,, Benefits and harms of spinal manipulative therapy for the treatment of chronic low back pain: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. BMJ, 2019. 364(1689).

2. Hanscom D “This Spine Surgeon says Avoid Spinal Surgery for Low Back Pain: Stop and Think Carefully about Back Surgery.”. Pain Chats, 2019.

3. Prevost C, G.B., Carleo B,, Manual therapy for the pediatric population: a systematic review. BMC Comp Altern Med, 2019. 19(60).

4. Peng T, C.B., Gabriel K,, Utilization of Chiropractic Care in US Children and Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Study of the 2012 National Health Interview Survey. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2018. 41(9): p. 725-733.

5. Manansala C, P.S., Pohlman K,, Change in young people’s spine pain following chiropractic care at a publicly funded healthcare facility in Canada. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 2019.


CF 009: With Dr. Tom Hollingsworth: The Case Against Chiropractic In Texas

We’ll be talking about any and every past attack on chiropractic in Texas and on our profession by the medical field heavyweights…..what’s at risk and why. In addition, we’ll be sharing some personal opinions, some facts, some research….and we’ll be discussing what you all can do to help if you are an active person that wants to pitch in.

Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast where we talk about issues related to health, chiropractic, evidence, and research and how those things all fit into a comprehensive approach for treating different conditions. Thank you for taking time out of your day to give us a listen. I know your time is valuable and I will always try hard to fill our time with valuable content.

Right off the top today, I want to welcome a good friend and colleague of mine, Dr. Tom Hollingsworth originally from Brady, TX and now living in Corpus Christi, TX. Dr. Hollingsworth is a master of linguistics and he’s a master of the material when it comes to what we’ve been through and what we are going through currently. In fact, Tom has helped prepare the court drafts so he has intimate knowledge and it’s a special treat to have Dr. Hollingsworth here to walk us through it all.

Welcome to the Chiropractic Forward podcast Dr. Hollingsworth. We’re so glad to have you with us today…

Have you ever heard the song “Corpus Christi Bay” by Robert Earl Keen and is it indeed hard to stay sober on the Corpus Christi Bay?

Tell me a little about your background and your family.

We have both been highly active in the Texas Chiropractic Association over the years. Everyone fits a certain function for sure. What have been your functions in the past on the Statewide level?

With this being an evidence-based podcast, can you offer some thoughts on whether or not there is room in an evidence-based model for chiropractic philosophy to maintain any sort of footprint in it?

There is so much material here, I want you to know that you have free-reign to interrupt, stop me, correct me, and keep me on track here. I encourage any and all participation from you on this.

When Chiropractors start talking about the attack on chiropractic in texas and other attacks we’ve endured and are enduring, we can go on for hours. We are going to try to convey a very serious and meaningful message about it all right here today but without getting into a three hour conversation.

I can only hope that all chiropractors in practice are well-aware of the trials and tribulations this amazing professions have, not only been through, but overcome and grew as a result. It is profound.

The unfortunate reality is that most do not know and, if they do, they normally lack any important details to truly place their knowledge in the correct context.

I believe that Dr. Hollingsworth will agree with me that, in our experience, lots of folks don’t know what’s going on with their profession….is that correct sir?

As a former board member of the Texas Chiropractic Association myself and a current member of the leadership statewide, we are intimately aware of many of the issues, both current and historically.

And I think, from the top here, it’s important to say that, even though Dr. Hollingsworth and myself are TCA members and leaders, our opinions may or may not represent the opinions of the TCA but we are NOT representing the TCA as we go through this podcast and in this capacity.

Anything you’d like to add to that disclaimer Dr. Hollingsworth?

We have all heard the stories of chiropractors being jailed for practicing. I remember a story from a documentary by Jeff Hayes called Doctored where a chiropractor is recalling how his father, who was also a chiropractor was in a bowling league. There was a medical doctor on the other team that refused to bowl against his father’s team simply because the team had a chiropractor on it.

Now, let’s run through the BIG ATTACK first. Folks, if you don’t know about Wilk vs. AMA, please do yourself, and all other chiropractors, a big favor and go check it out. To put it into a very brief blurb, basically, after 11 years of court proceedings, Dr. Chester Wilk and four other chiropractors, led by attorney George McAndrews, ultimately prevailed in proving the American Medical Association guilty of violating the Sherman anti-trust act. Meaning the AMA and several other medical institutions like the American Hospital Association, the American College of Surgeons, the American College of Physicians, and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals were found guilty of conspiring to eliminate chiropractic from the Earth. According to Chiro.org….”the suit claimed that the defendants had participated for years in an illegal conspiracy to destroy chiropractic. On August 24, 1987, after endless wrangling in the courts, U.S. District Court judge Susan Getzendanner ruled that the AMA and its officials were guilty, as charged, of attempting to eliminate the chiropractic profession. “

Does that about sum it up, Dr. Hollingsworth, and would you like to add to any of that?

Basically the AMA and others were proven guilty of the following acts against Chiropractic:

  • Encourage ethical complaints against doctors of chiropractic
  • Oppose chiropractic inroads into workmen’s comp
  • Oppose chiropractic inroads into health insurance and make it difficult for patients to get covered for chiropractic care
  • Oppose inroads into hospitals
  • Contain or eliminate Chiropractic schools
  • They conducted nationwide conferences on Chiropractic
  • Distributed anti-Chiropractic publications and propaganda
  • Helped other organizations prepare anti-chiropractic literature
  • Deemed it unethical for medical doctors to refer to, or accept referrals from, chiropractors.
  • And, they discouraged colleges, universities, and faculty from cooperating with chiropractic schools.

Can you believe that things have progressed to the point now that two of those organizations came out last year in support of Chiropractic for the treatment of acute and chronic and low back pain?

In referencing a blog of mine from November 11th, 2015 called Healthcare in Texas: The Battle Against a Monopoly. A True Story About David & Goliath,” I reminded myself of some more recent minor attacks. I’ll put the link in the show notes.

  • The Texas Medical Association attempted to remove Doctors of Chiropractic from the high school concussion oversight teams. They wanted to allow simple high school trainers but not chiropractors.
  • The same year, the TMA attempted to remove Chiropractors’ ability to perform physical exams on school bus drivers.
  • Same year, they tried to introduce legislation to remove our ability to perform high school exams on athletes. A function chiropractors have been performing for generations.

Now Dr. Hollingsworth, you’d think this would have put the battle to rest right? Can you go ahead and run through TMA #1 one for us please? The when, why, and what happened…

Before we get any further, how about we define Chiropractic. At least as far as the State of Texas is concerned, Tom.

I’d like to take just a second to direct everyone to an excellent video on YouTube that the Texas Chiropractic Association published about a year and a half ago concerning a lot of this. The link will be in the show notes but you can also find it by going to YouTube and searching the term “The Texas Chiropractic Defense From The Texas Medical Association A Timeline.” This ten minute video sums up what kind of constant attacks our profession is still enduring today.

So, we have Wilk vs. AMA that Chiropractic ultimately won, and we prevailed in the TMA #1 diagnosis case for the diagnosis issue…….now, surely, when the TBCE and the TCA triumphed in that one, that had to have killed any further attacks from the TMA right, Dr. Hollingsworth?

(Discuss VONT, Diagnosis #2, Sublux, and Neuro)

Tom, what is the current status on this case? It’s about to be go time right?

What kind of research is the TCA and TBCE team looking at using to bolster the case and why are we using these particular papers?

1.   MSK includes “associated” nerves

a. Concerning balance is Ex Parte Halsted

b. Careful to avoid claims toward entirety of nervous system (Hogs get slaughtered.)

2.   TMA depended greatly on UT Med School’s Leonard Cleary, PhD.’s deposition

a. Understandably supported TMA position MSK is not neuro

b. Heavily focused on structure considerations only in isolation from function

c. Ivory Tower challenged

i. by TBCE presenting Grays, and

ii. TCA presenting simpler TEA authors defining elements of muscle.

d. PRE-TRIAL appeal allowed for exam outside of MSK if it will lead to opinion of bio-mechanical condition of MSK.  So…

i. Neurotrophic effects on muscle

ii. Neurotrophic effects on bone  (Deposition Ex. 10)

3. Subluxation Complex

a. TBCE presented definitions of WHO, Dorland’s and compared them to TBCE’s. Can you expound on the different definitions for us please?

b. TCA presented Texts by Strang, Leach, King & Janig , and

i. AMA’s CPT definitions, 

ii. Bakris/Dickholtz NUCCA BP study

Now This is a paper we covered in podcast episode #7 but we also cited a couple others by AP Wong and by Yates, et. al. There’s no doubt we’re on solid ground here. 

c. TMA offered no witness qualified to opine on subluxation complex

i. However, a letter from them to TBCE when adding “subluxation” stated they preferred TBCE choosing the WHO definition (that includes “nerve”).

4. Vestibular-Ocular-Nystagmus Testing (VONT)

a. TMA offered a NeurOtologist (ENT subspecialty) and a PT

i. Argued training length (residency, etc.)

ii. Mostly Fair witness

iii. One key was distinguishing Vestib Apparatus from Vestib System

1. Had to get out of ear into processing centers

2. (Vestib Nuc and V-spinal tracts)

3. Attempt to utilize MD cultural authority on basic fact

4. Build on basic facts later.

iv. After hours of testimony from TMA’s vestibular experts, trial judge asked: “When are we going to hear about VONT?” 

Well, I suppose all we can do at this point is to continue to raise money from chiropractors that want to pitch in. We know that an appeals process is expensive. We also know that what happens in a state with over 5,000 chiropractors in it, usually tends to happen in other states down the line so it’s likely in every American chiropractor’s interest to get on board with this issue and contribute to its success.

If you would like to donate to this victory, I would direct you to the TCA since they are leading the way on this. Go to www.chirotexas.org/cdi

Please feel free to send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think or what suggestions you may have for us for future episodes. If you love what you hear, be sure to check out www.chiropracticforward.com. As this podcast builds, so will the website as we add more content, educational products, and a little further down the road, webinars, seminars, and speaking dates as they get added. Also, find our Facebook page where we’ll be sharing all kinds of good stuff from the shows and from our guests.

Reviews….folks, we need reviews over at the iTunes Chiropractic Forward page. That’s what tells iTunes that people are finding value in what we’re doing. We sure would appreciate it.

We cannot wait to connect again with you next week. From Creek Stone here in Amarillo, TX, home of the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Show Note resources

  1. Bakris G. (2007). “Special chiropractic adjustment lowers blood pressure among hypertensive patients with misaligned C-1 vertebra.”   Retrieved February 7, 2018, from http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/2007/20070314-atlas.html.
  2. Wong AP (2018). “Review: Beyond conventional therapies: Complementary and alternative medicine in the management of hypertension: An evidence-based review.” Pak J Pharm Sci 31(1): 237-244.
  3. Yates RG (1988). “Effects of chiropractic treatment on blood pressure and anxiety: a randomized, controlled trial.” Manip Physical Ther 11(6): 484-488.
  4. https://www.chiro.org/Wilk/
  5. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2616395
  6. https://www.amarillochiropractor.com/healthcare-in-texas-the-battle-against-a-monopoly-a-true-story-about-david-goliath-3/
  7. The Texas Chiropractic Defense From The Texas Medical Association A Timeline.
  8. https://youtu.be/XHGfAQwIqNo

 

Bibliography

Bakris G. (2007). “Special chiropractic adjustment lowers blood pressure among hypertensive patients with misaligned C-1 vertebra.”   Retrieved February 7, 2018, from http://www.uchospitals.edu/news/2007/20070314-atlas.html.

Wong AP (2018). “Review: Beyond conventional therapies: Complementary and alternative medicine in the management of hypertension: An evidence-based review.” Pak J Pharm Sci 31(1): 237-244.

Yates RG (1988). “Effects of chiropractic treatment on blood pressure and anxiety: a randomized, controlled trial.” Manip Physical Ther 11(6): 484-488.

 

CF 006: With Dr. Tyce Hergert: Astounding Expert Information On Immediate Headache Relief

This episode is all about headaches, it highlights one service dressed up and parading around as another sort of like it’s Halloween or something, and we’ll tell some personal stories about what we have seen in practice during our years of service to our patients. It should be a good one.

We are excited to welcome Dr. Tyce Hergert to the Chiropractic Forward podcast. Dr. Hergert has the distinct privilege of being the very first guest that we’ve ever had. Dr. Hergert was the Texas Chiropractic Association President, the head honcho, for 2016/2017 and, under his leadership the TCA was able to get 5 Chiropractic friendly bills through the legislation whereas we had failed to get even one through in all the years prior to that as far back as I had paid any attention so that was quite a feat.

Dr. Hergert is the owner/operator of Chiropractic Care Center of Southlake as well as the owner/operator of Southlake Physical Medicine in Southlake, TX

In addition, Dr. Hergert and myself both grew up in Perryton, TX. He was a couple of years younger than myself but we grew up on the same neighborhood, went to chiropractic school at the same time roughly, and have both served in the Texas Chiropractic Association at the same time. You could say that we know each other.

Welcome to the Chiropractic Forward Podcast Dr. Hergert. How do you feel about being the very first guest that we have ever had?

In this episode, I promise that we’re going to have more fun than being on the receiving end of a purple nurple.

This week, I want to discuss headaches and conservative, alternative headache treatment. It’s common for people to look at chiropractors as “spine people” and “back doctors”.

Is that your experience as well, Dr. Hergert?

What people don’t commonly know is that chiropractors can knock it straight out of the park when it comes to treating headaches. Yes, I said, “Knock it out of the park.” That’s an old metaphor comparing baseball players hitting home runs and I’m telling you, chiropractors mostly hit home runs on headache cases.

I have to admit that I was a terrible baseball player. I played college football and I’m Texan born and raised where football is King so I should probably put it in football terms.  In football terms, you might say that we chiropractors have a record of 80-yd touchdown passes when it comes to headaches. We return headache punts for a score almost every time. We pick-six those suckers. That’s probably enough to drive the point home.

Not every single headache of course. I’ve met my match several times over my 20 years in practice. But I don’t think it’s too bold to say that about 80%-90% of headache patients just improve. And not just improve, but DRAMATICALLY improve.

Before we get into the research, let me take a minute to give you just a couple of personal experiences in treating headache patients in my practice here in Amarillo.

Case #1: We will call this patient Andy McFuddlesticks just because I’m feeling a little goofy today. That sounds a little like a Harry Potter character, doesn’t it?

Andy had experienced migraines his whole life and was around 40 years old at the time we crossed paths. He had been to all of the medical doctors. He had endured injections if his suboccipital region. I don’t recall what the injection was exactly because this was about 18 years ago. I don’t believe they did botox for migraines at that point in time. He had gone through nuclear bones scans as well. Andy McFuddlesticks had been through it you might say.

He came to see me only a few times. It was frustrating that he didn’t finish his treatment plan but the reason he didn’t finish is satisfying. Andy only came a handful of times because the headaches were gone. After all of the years and procedures, just a few visits to a very new and green chiropractor made them vanish. How do I know? Well, I was in a civic organization with his brother who confirmed months later that his brother was doing great and had not had a headaches since seeing me. How is Andy 18 years later? I have no idea. I switched towns but I know he did great for a long time and we are putting that one in the “win” column.

Dr. Hergert, would you like to share one of your more memorable headache case stories with us?

Case #2: Sally McGullicutty I believe was her name. Red hair. Irish. Anyway, Sally had migraines for years. I actually knew Sally personally and had been friends for some time. Evidently I was not skilled at getting my message out on how successfully we can deal with headaches because it took Sally way longer than it should have taken her to make an appointment with us.

Sally shared with me that she had migraines, on average, several times a week and once or twice every month would find herself in a dark bathroom floor sitting my the toilet throwing up. How awful of an existence is that? I cannot even imagine being forced to live that way. I say it often but it bears repeating, “Pain can absolutely change a person.” Not only the person but it can change everyone around the person that is consistently in and out of contact with them.

After approximately 2-4 weeks of working with Sally, she just started to not have the migraines anymore! I would say she “magically” recovered but chiropractors know this isn’t accurate. We got the right joints moving, we got the right muscles to relax, and we got out of the way and let the body do the rest. There’s no magic in that. It’s just common sense to chiropractors.

Fast forward a few years and Sally is still a patient and Sally comes here for other reasons and conditions from time to time but she doesn’t visit because of migraines anymore. She just doesn’t have them.

How about one more story Dr. Hergert?

I’m pretty sure we could both absolutely go on and on with examples from personal experience in practice. I have 20 years of dealing with headaches and I can tell you, Chiropractors are modern day headache whisperers.

Let’s dive into a little research just to show you what I’m talking about. There are more we will go over in the future episodes but I want to touch on two this week. One new study and one older.

The first one is the more recent research paper and comes to us from a group in Spain. The lead author was Miguel Malo-Urries, PT, PhD with the University of Zaragoza Aragon Spain and it was published in Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics in the November-December 2017 issue, Volume 40, Issue 9, Pages 649-658. The study was titled “Immediate Effects of Upper Cervical Translatoric Mobilization on Cervical Mobility and Pressure Pain Threshold in Patients With Cervicogenic Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” What a name.

Did you catch that word, “Translatoric?” Dr. Hergert, have you run across this term prior to this interview?

I’m going to define that word for everyone. Translatoric is not commonly in the Chiropractic verbiage or vernacular. At least I don’t recall it from my education at Parker University in Dallas but that was eons ago. I have gray sideburns now. It has been a while. The authors of the paper all have PT behind their names so we have physical therapists setting the terms for the research project. Understanding this, then the use of translatoric makes more sense.

I found a site that gives a pretty good definition of Translatoric Spinal Manipulation. The term Translatoric Spinal Manipulation or TSM “consists of a series of high and low-velocity manipulative spinal techniques, which emphasize the use of small amplitude, straight-line (or translatoric) traction and gliding impulses delivered parallel or perpendicular to an individual vertebral joint or movement segment. Furthermore, TSM emphasizes the use of either direct manual stabilization or the use of spinal pre-positioning to restrict the amount of motion occurring at adjacent spinal segments during the translatoric impulse.” The website goes on to say, “Delivering translatoric impulses (in the form of disc traction, disc glides, facet traction and facet gliding) to an individual joint or spinal motion segment while using stabilization provides the manual therapist with a manipulative tool that has a predictable effect in terms of pain reduction and motion restoration with minimal potential risk of patient injury.”

Do you know what that sounds like to me? Dr. Hergert, what does it sound like it’s describing to you?

It sounds like a “Chiropractic Adjustment.” Another term it sounds like is “Spinal Manipulative Treatment/Therapy.” Something we chiropractors have been doing for over 100 years and have been called crazies and quacks for doing. It sounds like the exact thing that the medical world has touted as being responsible for strokes for years and years. Of course, research proves that they don’t have a clue what they’re talking about on the storke issue but translatoric spinal manipulation is nothing more than a Chiropractic Adjustment.

Now that that is clear, let’s get back into the research.

Why They Did It

The good folks in Spain performing Translatoric Spinal Manipulation rather than Chiropractic Adjustments wished to assess the response in terms of range of motion and pain in patients suffering cervicogenic headaches.

How They Did It

  • It was a randomized controlled trial
  • The paper included 82 patients.
  • The patients ranged in age from about 25-55 or so.
  • All patients suffered from cervicogenic headaches.
  • The patients were randomly split up into two groups. One was a control group and one was a treatment group.
  • The treatment group received Chiropractic Adjustments…..I’m sorry…Translatoric Spinal Manipulation.
  • The control group received no treatment or sham treatment.
  • The researchers tested Cervical range of motion, they tested the pressure pain thresholds over the upper trapezius muscles, the C2-3 zygapophyseal joints and sub occipital muscles were tested, and the current headache intensity were all measured on the Visual Analog Scale prior to the Chiropractic adjustment and right after.
  • The testing was done by two blinded investigators

What They Found

  • Afterward, the Chiropractic Adjustment group had significantly increased range of motion in the neck region overall as well as in the flexion-rotation test.
  • And, while there was no changes in the pain thresholds, patients reported significantly lower intensity in their headaches!

Wrap It Up

The quote from the authors themselves reads as follows, “Upper cervical translatoric spinal mobilization intervention increased upper, and exhibited a tendency to improve general, cervical range of motion and induce immediate headache relief in subjects with cervicogenic headache.”

Dr. Hergert….do the findings in the study surprise you at all?

What are your initial impressions of the study?

I’d say that, if you have issues with chiropractors, now you can just take it straight from physical therapists with PhD’s that are performing chiropractic adjustments but calling it something else.

I want to be honest here: the frustrating part of this for me isn’t necessarily the fact that PTs are doing cervical chiropractic adjustments. Heck, chiropractors have been doing PT for years but the physical therapists claim ownership of the term so the chiropractic industry just call it exercise rehab.

Although, their doing adjustments may be irritating on some level, the most irritating thing is that a certain aspect of the physical therapy community and a larger aspect of the medical community have spent years ridiculing, mocking, and belittling generations of chiropractors. And now, doctors of osteopathy and physical therapists are trying to do the exact same thing without going through any chiropractic training. You would think they would at least release a statement saying, “You know, we have thrown rocks at chiropractors for years but it turns out they were right all along so, since we can’t beat them, we’re going to just join them.”

Wouldn’t that be refreshing?

Can I get an amen on that Dr. Hergert? Do you have any other thoughts on that?

I’m geting all bothered over here so let’s go over the older study before I start getting too ugly about the whole deal.

This one is by GV Espi-Lopez et. al. and is called, “Do manual therapy techniques have a positive effect on quality of life in people with tension-type headache? A randomized controlled trial.” It was published in the European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine  on February 29th of 2016.

Why They Did It

Although there have been lots of studies that prove the impact of manual therapy and spinal mobilization for frequency and intensity of pain suffered from tension type headaches, there have been no studies in regards to the effectiveness of the same therapies for the quality of life for the people suffering from them.

The authors of this paper wished to focus on patient quality of life.

How They Did It

•The study was again, a randomized, single blinded, controlled clinical trial.

•Comprised of 62 women and 14 men.

•Aged between 65 years old all the way down to 18 years old.

•All subjects suffered from chronic tension type headaches or episodic tension type headaches.

•The subjects were categorized into four separate groups: suboccipital inhibitory pressure, suboccipital spinal manipulation, a combination of the two together, and then a control group.

•An SF–12 questionnaire was used to help assess the subjects’ quality of life at both the beginning of treatment, the ending of the treatment, as well as at the one month follow-up.

What They Found

•The suboccipital inhibition group improved significantly in their quality of life at the one month mark as well as improvements in moderate physical activities.

•Not the control group, but all other treatment groups had an improvement in physical activities, pain, and social functioning at the one month mark.

•After treatment, as well as that the one month mark, the combined treatment category had improved vitality.

•Following treatment and at the one-month mark, both groups that had manipulation to the sub occipital region also showed improved mental health.

Wrap It Up
All three therapy approaches showed significant effectiveness toward improving the quality of life, however the combined treatment therapy had the most dramatic change for the good.
In short, manual therapy techniques and manipulation applied to the sub occipital region for four weeks or more showed great improvement and in effectiveness for several aspects that measure the quality of life of a patient having suffered from tension type headaches.

Dr. Hergert…you like apples? Lol Do these findings reflect what you have seen over the years there in Southlake, TX?

These are just a couple of studies to get us started off on the right foot for headache discussions on the Chiropractic Forward Podcast. There are several more I will be sharing in the future so stay tuned.

When Chiropractic is at its best, you cannot beat the risk vs reward ratio. Plain and simple. Spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment rather than chemical treatment such as pain killers, muscle relaxants, and anti-inflammatories.

I mentioned this in episode #1 but Dr. Hergert and myself spend some time trying to generate a concise, responsible statement regarding chiropractic care in general. A statement that could easily be shared. An elevator speech for the profession if you will. You will find it at the end of every blog, every video, and every chiropractic forward podcast. It is as follows:
Research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, in comparison to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic. Chiropractic care is safe, more cost-effective, it decreases your chances of having surgery, and it reduces your chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically. In addition, we can do it with minimal time requirements and minimal hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health!

Thank you to Dr. Hergert for spending his valuable time with us today. We look forward to many more guest appearances.

Please feel free to send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think or if you have any suggestions for future episodes.

From Creek Stone in Amarillo, TX and the flight deck of the Chiropractic Forward podcast, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, & forward.

https://www.jmptonline.org/article/S0161-4754(16)30281-0/fulltext?elsca1=etoc&elsca2=email&elsca3=0161-4754_201711_40_9_&elsca4=Physical%20Medicine%20and%20Rehabilitation%7CHealth%20Professions

https://www.optp.com/Translatoric-Spinal-Manipulation-for-Physical-Therapists-Book-and-DVD

https://www.amarillochiropractor.com/get-rid-of-migraines-and-headaches-once-and-for-all/

CF 005: Valuable & Reliable Expert Advice On Clinical Guides For Your Practice

This weeks’s entry is going to be a little long and it’s definitly more geared to chiropractic practitioners rather than patients or potential patients. Unless you are a patient that is just a little bent toward practice protocols and I just don’t know very many of those types of patients. I can see where a patient may be interested in this week’s edition if they feel they have received poor treatment in the past I suppose but most patients likely won’t be interested this week.

Welcome to episode #5. We’re on a roll folks. We’re going to have more fun than walking on hot coals today.

Have you ever been in practice, especially in the early years, wondering if you’re doing things right? I mean, they taught you how to diagnose. The taught you how to evaluate and adjust. But what about all of the gaps in between? Did you get it all and, if you got it, did it stick? Did you retain it? We all have questions about certain issues. If you aren’t always learning and asking yourselves questions, then I would suggest that you do. I believe that’s how we grow.

In this episode we are going to try to help answer some age-old questions that many chiropractors get out of school not necessarily knowing the answers to. We are going to cover recommendations on how often, what, why, and how for your practices. It should be interesting for most of you. That’s my hope anyway. So buckle up.

Many of us in the chiropractic profession tend to wonder around on our own islands for years without any sort of mentorship or guidance. If I’m being honest, and I am, I was that way myself until about 11 or so years ago when I decided to start paying attention. In fact, there are still times I find myself researching the latest standards of practice and guidelines to make sure that I am not an outlier in my profession without even realizing that I’m an outlier. Healthcare tends to change so quickly that it is a scenario I would assume occurs more often than we think.

This sort of information can admittedly be monotonous and can make your eyes bleed if you allow. Some LOVE to dive into long text and technical terms but I’m guessing most do not. That is why I am offering it in different forms.

Different people communicate in different ways. Some prefer email. Some prefer texts. I like videos while others prefer blogs. Podcasts, Reddit, etc… It’s all a part of communicating in the best, most effective way possible. With this in mind, I offer you this information in blog form, on YouTube in a video, and in Podcast form in the hopes that you guys and gals out there can digest it and maybe even RECEIVE it rather than just simply take note of it, before moving on to something else.

The impetus for this week’s information comes from a blog I read that was recently published on the American Chiropractic Association’s blog. You can find this at www.ACAtoday.org/blog. The blog was posted December 28, 2017. It was titled “Research Review: Clinical Practice Guideline: Chiropractic Care for Low Back Pain,” and was submitted by Dr. Shawn Thistle(1). Dr. Thistle is the founder of RRS Education which is a continuing education company providing weekly research reviews. Much like we do right here on my blog, on YouTube, or as part of the Chiropractic Forward Podcast.

I have used Dr. Thistle’s article here as the template and simply “overdubbed” and commented on it as I went through it.

In this article, Dr. Thistle reviews a research paper called “Clinical Practice Guideline: Chiropractic Care for Low Back Pain,” The lead author and researcher for the paper was Dr. Gary Globe who has a Masters in Business, a Doctor of Chiropractic, and a PhD.  The paper was published in the Journal of Manipulative & Physiological Therapeutics in Volume 30, Issue 1, in 2016(2).

Basically, we are doing a review of a review. You may wonder why this is even necessary to do on my part. I feel it’s necessary because I believe my calling is to take more difficult or more boring concepts, terms, and ideas and to then strip them down into a very understandable and more palatable form. A transfer of information, if you will. Hopefully I can get that information distributed to folks that need it. If we just left it at this blog, it is my assumption that the people that really need the information may not get it. In other words the people that read the American Chiropractic Association’s blog probably have already familiarized themselves with much of this information. However, people that do not read their blog likely do not keep up with Chiropractic research either. If they’re not involved, then they’re just not involved usually. They may be outliers in the profession because they have likely never been exposed to this sort of evidence-based information.

I’m hoping that’s where I come into the picture.

First, why would chiropractors be interested in guidelines of any sort? I would share with you that a frustrating part of our profession for me personally is that there seems to be no standardization that is widely followed or respected by chiropractors as a population. Some practitioners in Chiropractic may think that’s a great thing and that that’s what is unique about Chiropractic. I am of the thought that it’s a good thing when you go to a practitioner of any style and you can feel comfortable knowing there are professional standards of care being followed by your caregiver. It’s when practitioners have not educated themselves or have not at least been somewhat in tune to what’s going on in their profession that they may start to be considered outliers and can run the risk of getting themselves into some sort of trouble professionally. Nobody wants that.

Let’s be clear; following guidelines don’t mean that the practitioner has no autonomy or that there is no professional decision-making going on. They are just that: guidelines. General guidelines that not only help your decision-making process, but also give you something to refer to should there be any questions down the road about your treatment plans or protocols. I call that “standing on solid ground.”

When you have so many webinar and seminar folks trying to scare chiropractors into buying their courses and marketing to them by triggering the fear of either being sued or jailed if they don’t buy, well….standing on solid ground is always a bit liberating.

Be honest here, how does it look when one chiropractor tells the patient they need to be seen 55 times this year and this happens just one or two weeks before a doctor with the second opinion says the standards of practice require 18 visits over the next 2 months or so for the same issue? Of course, that reflects poorly on the first chiropractor but wouldn’t you agree that it also reflects poorly on Chiropractic in general?

I am in no way saying that there are not conditions requiring 55 visits so don’t send me any hate email. I’m simply using a generalized example here. I’ve always felt that treatment should have a start, it should have a finish, it should be responsible and smart recommendations, and upon completion should enter the maintenance phase. If we aren’t giving good recommendations, Then we simply are not doing our job. But it’s also my opinion that if you’re not staying on top of research and current standards of practice, then that also means you’re not doing your job.

Now that we talked about standards of practice and guidelines, let’s dive into this research and guideline summary.

Why They Did It

Everyone should know by now that low back pain is the leading cause of disability around the world. Research has continued to show over and over that chiropractors are highly effective when it comes to low back pain. Even traditional chiropractic haters, at this point, mostly concede the fact. The goal of this research project seems to be focused on providing some sort of standardization and guideline protocol for an easier and smoother transition into an integrated setting in the medical world. The project focused on nonspecific low back pain.

How They Did It

The authors underwent a comprehensive search of the literature. They found 270 relevant articles. After screening the 270 articles, only 18 where accepted for the paper. Of those 18, sixteen of the papers were accepted as high-quality.

Here’s where we get into the thick of it. They break their points down into the following categories: general considerations, informed consent, severity and duration of conditions, examination procedures for lower back pain, treatment frequency and duration, initial course of care for low back disorders, re-evaluation and re-examination, benefit vs. risk, contraindications and cautions, and chronic pain management for spinal disorders.

Let’s dive into those sections a little further point by point and try to make some sense of it all.

General Considerations. 

  • If a patient gets chiropractic treatment in the acute pain phase, they usually have full recovery of the complaint. Even though they may have full recovery, recurrence of the pain can be common.
  • If not treated properly in the beginning, it could turn chronic with increased disability.
  • Practitioners, at all times, should be mindful of red flags and yellow flags. In case you don’t know, yellow flags are usually associated with chronic pain or disability. Some examples may be negative coping strategies, poor self efficacy beliefs, fear of avoidance behavior, and distress. That’s according to Dynamic Chiropractic, Nov. 30, 2002, Vol. 20, Issue 25 by Craig Liebenson, DC. Patients with high yellow flag scores should not be labeled with an injured back. For example, telling the patient they have a ruptured disc may not be the best idea. Your treatment should reduce dependency on medication and encourage active treatment rather than passive treatment and should include self-treatment protocols(3).
  • The authors of this paper feel that the goal of chiropractic should be improving the patients’ functional capacity as well as educating them to accept responsibility for their own health.

Informed Consent: Chiropractors often get into trouble because they lack a proper informed consent procedure.

  • Basically, informed consent is communication between your office and a patient that results in the patient giving you authorization for treatment.
  • An informed consent should include a clear explanation of the diagnosis, of your examination, and what you propose to do as far as treatment. This should include treatment options and possible risks involved.
  • If the person appears to be of sound mind to perform an informed consent, you have satisfied recommendations, assuming they have no further questions.

Examination Procedures for Low Back Pain:

  • While there is no limit to what the examination includes, there should at minimum be a health history, an examination that includes range of motion, orthopedic tests, and/or neurological testing, and further diagnostics when indicated. These may include lab tests or imaging.
  • This report says that range of motion should not be used to determine a person’s functional status but can be used as part of the exam to assess regional mobility.
  • As part of the exam process, they don’t recommend routine imaging for diagnostic tests in cases of nonspecific low back pain.
  • With that being said, if serious pathology is suspected or if someone is having neurological issues associated with it, then of course further diagnostics would be appropriate.
  • While the authors are not proponents of regular imaging, MRIs are indicated when the low back complaint is associated with symptoms of stenosis or radiculopathy.
  • Another condition in which a practitioner may consider getting imaging would be when the patient has not responded to a reasonable, responsible short-term conservative protocol or if you have reason to suspect something else is going on such as spondylolisthesis.

Severity & Duration of Conditions: this is a really simple section that can cause confusion by those that have just never had the information or have forgotten it.

  • An acute complaint refers to something that has been experienced for less than six weeks (1.5 months).
  • A subacute symptom has lasted between six and 12 week (1.5 months to just under 3 months).
  • A chronic condition is something that has lasted 12 weeks minimum (3 months).
  • A recurrence means the return of the symptom that is suspected to be similar to their original complaint.

Treatment Frequency & Duration:

  • The authors indicate that most patients respond to your care but that the treatment frequency and duration may change depending on the patient themselves. They may have other issues including red and yellow flags that extend, or alter in some way, the duration or the frequency of treatment. Again, the practitioner must always be mindful of the red and yellow flags.
  • The paper suggests that the effectiveness of care should be evaluated both subjectively and objectively during or after each course of care. In our office we use the Functional Rating Index (FRI) every single day upon the patient’s arrival. We also use outcome assessment questionnaires fairly often. We use them for a baseline during the initial treatment, again at each re-examination, and then again upon the conclusion of the treatment schedule. In addition to that, our patients are asked to rate their pain on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for each complaint at each visit. It takes seconds. Yes, it’s subjective and can have a wide variance from day to day for the same person but, when you are keeping these types of records, you are standing on more solid ground if anything about you or your treatment ever comes into question. Not to mention, it’s just better for the patient to be kept track of in this manner.
  • Here is a quasi-answer to a big question. The question I’m referring to is, “How often should I see someone?” Well, the full answer is not in this paper but there are hints at it. The researchers here suggest that a therapeutic trial of chiropractic is usually between 6 and 12 visits that takes anywhere from 2 to 4 weeks to complete. That seems to be about the average. For further insight into generally accepted treatment protocols, you may try looking at the Council on Chiropractic Guidelines & Practice Parameters (CCGPP) guidelines(4).

Initial Course of Care for Low Back Disorders

  • The best evidence of efficacy is in High Velocity/Low Amplitude manipulation and in mobilization. 
  • A good starting point in care is passive physiotherapy like electric stim, cold laser, ultrasound, etc for pain. Additionally a practitioner should attempt to educate the patient about their complaint and set in place recommendations for self-management of the complaint.
  • As the authors state, physiotherapy shouldn’t be used individually or isolated as the lone means of treatment. As I tell my patients, “There is a mountain of evidence for manipulation/mobilization, for certain physiotherapies, and for exercise/rehab but the best evidence show the greatest effectiveness comes from the three being combined and integrated into a treatment protocol that is reasonable and makes sense.” How it is used will come down to practitioner judgement and patient preference.
  • The authors here state that they cannot recommend the use of lumbar supports like bracing, taping, or orthoses because the research just isn’t there to support it at this time.
  • Active care, otherwise known as exercise/rehab, should become a bigger and bigger part of all chiropractic clinical protocols. I often will try to relate this to patients in a way that make sense in the medical world. When appropriate I may say something like, “What happens on the day after someone has a knee replacement, appendectomy, or a C-section? They have them up walking, which may seem counterproductive to do so soon after a surgery. In fact, for low back pain, a common recommendation used to be to go home, get in bed, and wait it out. But, they realized that movement is healing. Part of the healing is getting the joints moving properly through manipulation and joint mobilization but that’s just part of it. Another big aspect of it is exercise/rehab; both here in the office and at home.” Chiropractic practitoners need to stress it.
  • The more you explain why you want them performing exercise/rehab and the more you stress that exercise/rehab is part of the protocol from the very start, the less resistance you tend to run into later down the road.

Re-examination & Re-evaluation

  • After your initial recommendations are fulfilled, then what? You need to determine whether any further treatment is indicated and why it’s indicated. What was the patient’s response to your care?
  • If you threw everything in your office including the kitchen sink at someone for 2-4 weeks for 6-12 visits and saw little to no improvement, do you think any further treatment is likely to bring about positive change? Not very likely. It’s times like these that I swallow my pride and, in the best interest of the patient and my reputation, I find them a referral to a reputable practitioner that may be better-suited to address the complaint. I wouldn’t want a family member of mine treated any differently so I don’t treat patients any differently.
  • On the other hand, if the patient’s complaint is resolved, you should perform a final exam and outcome assessment questionnaire, make sure the patient is adequately educated on your recommendations going forward (exercise, maintenance care, etc.), and then release the patient from the active care protocol.

Benefit vs. Risk

  • The authors state that chiropractic care is remarkably safe and effective. Certainly when compared to our medical counterparts. Even though we all know this already, it never hurts to re-state the obvious. I hope you don’t mind.
  • The paper says that serious adverse reactions to chiropractic care tend to only happen to the tune of 1 in 1 million patient visits when referring to treatment for low back pain.
  • The authors went a little further by saying that, while adverse reactions were very rare, other more mild-moderate events were noticed like muscle soreness or stiffness. We see this in my office here and there as well. If they have never been to a chiropractor and then get sore after the first one or two visits, one could compare that to going to the gym after laying off for an extended time. You are doing something new and something different with the body. It makes sense for people to get a little sore sometimes.

Contraindications & Cautions: have you always been completely aware and knowledgeable on what constitutes a hard contraindication to chiropractic care? The authors try to help us all out here so listen up. This is a biggie. Since I feel the importance of knowing these are paramount to your longevity in practice, I am going to quote these conditions directly from the source(1) for accuracy. Don’t be caught having treated these conditions. 

  • General Conditions: severe osteoporosis, multiple myeloma, osteomyelitis, local primary bone tumors where osseous integrity is questionable, local metastatic bone tumors, Paget’s disease.
  • Neurological Conditions: progressive or sudden neurological deficit (including cauda equina syndrome) or spinal cord tumors demonstrating neurological compromise (care may be appropriate after specialist investigation and clearance)
  • Inflammatory Conditions: rheumatoid arthritis in active systemic stage (or locally in the presence of inflammation or atlantoaxial instability), inflammatory phase of ankylosing spondylitis or psoriatic arthritis, or Reiter’s syndrome (reactive arthritis).
  • Bleeding Disorders: congenital or acquired, unstable aortic aneurysm, etc.
  • Other: structural instability, inadequate physical exam, or inadequate SMT training/skills

Chronic Pain Management for Spinal Disorders:

These conditions can no longer be referred to as “acute” or “uncomplicated” as they are beyond 3 months in duration at the point of being labeled “chronic” and other factors must be considered in a robust treatment protocol. Some complications may include:

  • Work environment, including ergonomics
  • Work requirements
  • Comorbidities. Some may wonder, “What the heck is that?!?” Well, that is when you have two or more other conditions occurring in addition to the initial diagnosis. Low back pain in addition to arthritis and diabetes is an example. Low back pain in addition to obesity and depression could be another.
  • The history of the condition’s prior treatments
  • Lifestyle factors including bad habits
  • Other psychological factors which may include depression, anxiety, etc….

Whew….that was a lot, right?

With such an amount of information to wade through, I would say, that Dr. Thistle did a great job of reviewing this paper for the American Chiropractic Association’s blog and I hope, in turn, that I have been able to bring even more clarity and maybe even relate it to my personal practice and your practice in a way that really drives home the need for more regulation and practice standards in our profession.

As the internet and the “Age of Information” has brought the world together, I believe the days of being a lone wolf and/or being an outlier may be numbered. When they say that ignorance is not a defense, that especially rings true now that information is at our very fingertips at all times of the day no matter where we may be.

You may agree with me that this is a good thing. You may disagree and think I’m off my rocker for wanting some standards in the profession. Chiropractic practitioners differ from one to the other. That’s OK. Differences in opinions is American to the core. Usually what triumphs is reason and, if you find these guidelines or those of the CCGPP to be reasonable guides, I hope you will consider giving them more thought and maybe even implement them into your regular treatment protocols.

Regardless of how you go about practicing, I’m a firm believer that we chiropractors can absolutely change the world when it comes to the treatment of non-complicated neuromusculoskeletal conditions of the body. Not just low back pain either, but the whole shibang. As I said last week, if we were wrong in what we do as a profession, we would have been wiped off the face of the Earth years ago. Lord knows they tried and keep trying.

We are still here because we are naturally right but, we give our detractors ammunition for the battle when we are not holding ourselves and our profession to certain reasonable and responsible standards.

I hope you will stop by our websites and get involved with what we are doing. chiropracticforward.com is our podcast site. We have years of research-based blogs available right now at amarillochiropractor.com/blog as well. Not to mention our YouTube channel which can be found by searching Creek Stone Integrated Care Jeff Williams in a YouTube search. Find Chiropractic Forward on Facebook as well as Twitter which is @Chiro_Forward. Subscribe, share, and do all the things that help us grow and spread our message.

When Chiropractic is at its best, you cannot beat the risk vs reward ratio. Plain and simple. Spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment rather than chemical treatment such as pain killers, muscle relaxants, and anti-inflammatories.

Just another reason to call a chiropractor TODAY!
Research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, in comparison to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic. Chiropractic care is safe, more cost-effective, it decreases your chances of having surgery, and it reduces your chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically. In addition, we can do it with minimal time requirements and minimal hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health!

Please feel free to send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think or if you have any suggestions for future episodes.

From Creek Stone in Amarillo, TX and the flight deck of the Chiropractic Forward podcast, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, & forward.

  1. https://www.acatoday.org/News-Publications/ACA-Blogs/ArtMID/6925/ArticleID/315/Research-Review-Clinical-Practice-Guideline-Chiropractic-Care-for-Low-Back-Pain
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26804581
  3. https://www.dynamicchiropractic.com/mpacms/dc/article.php?id=15493
  4. https://clinicalcompass.org

 

CF 004: And Instantly, Treatment of Back Pain Changes Due To Increase In Opioid-Related Deaths

This week we’re going to discuss some attacks on the profession in the not-so-distant past, we’ll talk about the current state of the opioid epidemic, and we’ll talk about why right now is such a good time for what is going on with Chiropractic research.

Before we get to the meat of the subject this week, I want to say that I hope you all had a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. My family brought it in sitting on the couch drinking decaf coffee. It was very uneventful but pleasant. I used to be a traveling musician in what seems like a former life now and…if you’d have told me 10 years ago that I’d be bringing in the new year sitting on the couch drinking coffee, I would have laughed at you in a dismissive way and probably had given you a look that you would not have taken as being positive. But, jobs and kids and family have a way of forcing the needed changes and that’s OK with me. It’s all a part of life and you better believe I’m living it.

Here’s wishing you all a happy and prosperous 2018.

Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming. This week, we’re going to have more fun that Chinese algebra. Just sit back and watch. I tell you the truth.

Seriously though, this is the place where we talk about some pretty cool stuff going on in the Chiropractic field that is based on research and evidence. How cool is that? When you can just sit back and let all the super smart guys and gals validate everything you do? What a blessing. Of course, we chiropractors have always known we were right about how to go about treating our patients. Think about it. Think about the generations of attacks this profession has endured through the years from extremely powerful people in the legislative and in the healthcare world. The American Medical Association. I’m not sure it gets more powerful than that. Heck, they even lost an anti-trust case in the Supreme Court when chiropractors sued them. In short, chiropractors proved in Federal Court that the American Medical Association did the following or encouraged their members in the following manner:

  • They encouraged ethical complaints against doctors of chiropractic;
  • They opposed chiropractic inroads in health insurance;
  • They Opposed chiropractic inroads in workmen’s compensation;
  • They opposed chiropractic inroads into labor unions;
  • They opposed chiropractic inroads into hospitals; and
  • They attempted to contain chiropractic schools.
  • They conducted nationwide conferences on chiropractic;
  • They distributed publications critical of chiropractic;
  • They assisted others in preparation of anti-chiropractic literature;
  • They warned medical doctors and their underlings that professional association between medical physicians and chiropractors was unethical; and
  • They discouraged colleges, universities and faculty from cooperating with chiropractic schools.

If you hear all of this ridiculousness and you say to yourself, “There’s no way that’s true,” then please do us both a big favor and Google the term Wilk vs. AMA and that should tell you all you need to know about the matter.

Anyway, to my original point, if we weren’t right, we would have been destroyed years ago by the machine. I want you to listen to me here. Let me say it again, if we chiropractors were not right, we would have been wiped off the map years ago. It certainly wasn’t from a lack of effort on the part of the powers that be.

The best part about the blogs and podcasts and videos I share every week is that most everything we talk about has its roots in research. How do you generate facts? I’d argue it’s through research. I hear it all the time: “I believe in chiropractics.” My response is pretty simple. We’re not a church. You don’t have to believe. We have mountains of research. The problem is, few people know about it.

I don’t like the fact that our national debt and deficit is what it is. But, they’re just facts and we have to learn to live with it. Well, the medical field is starting to learn to live with some new facts. In fact, they’re getting smacked down like a red-headed step kid by these facts!

Facts like this…the opioid crisis cost the US economy $504 billion dollars in 2015 according to an article from Reuters this year written by Lucia Mutikani and Ginger Gibson. There authors of the article were relaying information taken from the White House Council of Economic Advisers (CEA).

There is no reason to expect this number to improve any time soon either. If indicators are correct, as numbers become more available for 2016 and 2017, you’ll see this amount explode.

The opioid crisis has reached the point that President Trump was forced to declare it a public health emergency.

The article goes on to discuss the fact that there was a total of $221 billion to $431 billion in lost economic output due to there being 33,000 opioid-related deaths in 2015. The wide range in dollar amounts is to take into account the fact that there are several different models but, I think you get the idea. It’s incredibly significant.

“The crisis has worsened, especially in terms of overdose deaths which have doubled in the past ten years,” the CEA said. Wow. And, if I’m correct, yo u can compare the crisis to a fire. While it may have taken 10 years to double (which is bad), I believe the rate of expansion of the problem has increased exponentially.

The article wraps up by citing the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as saying more than 100 Americans die daily from related overdoses. On top of that, new information is out that opioid-related deaths have now surpassed breast cancer. I love that the NFL does the pink uniforms during October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month but I’m wondering if now we’ll start seeing a specific color and more awareness for the Opioid Addiction Awareness Month or something of that nature. It’s bad, y’all.

https://www.reuters.com/article/legal-us-usa-opioids-cost/opioid-crisis-cost-u-s-economy-504-billion-in-2015-white-house-idUSKBN1DL2Q0

How bad is it? It’s so bad that a recent article in The Guardian says that overall life expectancy in the US has declined for the second year in a row as a result of the opioid crisis. Can you imagine? It’s the first time in 50 years that the US life expectancy has gone down for 2 years in a row. The last time was the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and sixty-three!

The article in The Guardian was written by Jessica Glenza and was published on December 21, 2017. In the article, she shares that there were 63,600 opioid-related deaths in 2016 which was an increase of 21% from the 2015. These numbers came from the National Center for Health Statistics.

As I hinted in the beginning of this blog, early indications for 2017 aren’t looking very bright. Robert Anderson of the National Center for Health Statistics says of 2017, “It doesn’t look any better.” Anderson goes on to say, “We haven’t seen more than two years in a row in declining life expectancy since the Spanish flu100 years ago,” said Anderson. “We would be entering that sort of territory, which is extremely concerning.”

There are guesstimates that this crisis is going to take a good 10-20 years to turn around now that multiple generations are already hooked.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/dec/21/us-life-expectancy-down-for-second-year-in-a-row-amid-opioid-crisis

Realizing that the first phase of the opioid crisis was started by physicians over-prescribing these opioids, the American Medical Association and the American College of Physicians have really stepped up in a way that I would believe most alternative caregivers would describe as rather unexpected considering the history of these organizations. They have consistently and constantly attacked – verbally, in the courts, and legislatively – just about any and all alternative healthcare protocols up to this point in history.

However, in new recommendations put out in February of 2017, the American College of Physicians have now started recommending Chiropractic, Massage, and/or Acupuncture as first-line treatment for acute and chronic low back pain before even taking an over-the-counter anti-inflammatory such as Aspirin, Tylenol, or Ibuprofen.

Quickly thereafter (2 months), the American Medical Association published an article in its journal called Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in support of the updated recommendations made by the American College of Physicians.

I would say they need to go ahead and expand it to the entire musculoskeletal system but acute and chronic low back pain is a good starting point I suppose.

In the end, it is my firm belief that patients are entitled to the best treatments that do the least harm. There is nothing out there safer and more effective than chiropractic, massage, and/or acupuncture.

Through the years, I have carried with me a wonderful quote by Dr. Lee Green, a Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan. He said, ”Neck pain is a mechanical problem, and it makes sense that mechanical treatment works better than a chemical one.”

Doesn’t it?

Just another reason to call a chiropractor TODAY!

  • Research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, in comparison to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic. Chiropractic care is safe, more cost-effective, it decreases your chances of having surgery, and it reduces your chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically. In addition, we can do it with minimal time requirements and minimal hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health!

https://www.amarillochiropractor.com/evidence-backed-reason-add-chiropractic/

I want you to be sure you know all about our blog and our YouTube channel. Currently, we have these entities set up under Creek Stone Integrated Care. Now, with the building of the Chiropractic Forward podcast site, how’s that going to change and how’s that going to look? I haven’t figured that part out just yet but know this, you can get your fix on all things chiropractically researched by going to amarillochiropractor.com and clicking on the blog button. Or, you can visit our youtube channel by searching Creek Stone Integrated Care in the YouTube search

Be looking for our upcoming website at chiropracticforward.com. It is not ready but it will be soon enough. It’s closer every week. I don’t know if you know this but I am all over social media in a whole bunch of areas. For a list of links, see the show notes and we’ll see you somewhere in that list I hope.

Thank you for listening. You know, sharing is caring and that’s how we get to more and more ears. If you like what you hear and you know other chiropractors or medical field professionals…..or even potential chiropractic patients….make sure you share our podcast with them. Together we can make a difference and help people get off of medication, get out of pain, and get healthier overall.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams from the Chiropractic Forward Flight deck saying upward, onward, and forward .

CF 002: Research Information – Integrating Chiropractors Into Overall Healthcare System

We going to talk a little about Canada in this episode. We’re going to talk about small town healthcare. And we’re going to tell you about a great research project paper that is suggesting that Chiropractors have a lot to offer mainstream medicine.

In a recent article that I wrote, I mentioned how the Canadian health system was ahead of the American health system. Not in the traditional sense but, when speaking about the groundwork their government is laying in respect to the chiropractic profession and its integration into the overall healthcare system in Canada.

The American healthcare system is lagging far behind Canada in that respect.

Imagine that you live in a rural community.

Some of you actually do live in a rural community in the middle of nowhere so that won’t be much of a leap for you. Now imagine that your choice of healthcare practitioners is only limited to 2 or 3 medical doctors. In addition, imagine that one or two of the three or four doctors in town like to prescribe pills rather than actually try to deal with the root of a musculoskeletal issue.

As I shared in episode #1, I got hurt skiing….no x-rays, etc…

In a case such as that, you had better hope that the one or two remaining doctors in that town are rock stars when it comes to treating non-complicated musculoskeletal issues. Unfortunately, the chances are that he or she will not be a rockstar for musculoskeletal issues.

They may be excellent at dealing with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. However, research is clear that medical doctors don’t graduate medical school with a high degree of proficiency in musculoskeletal issues. We will have future episodes that compare some medical vs. chiro education and that shows what chiropractors can do when they graduate.

Saying that medical doctors aren’t generally musculoskeletal rock stars is simply a fact of life, not a knock against medical schools or medical doctors.

Now that the American College of Physicians as well as the American Medical Association have come out with updated recommendations that recommend chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage as first-line treatments for acute and chronic low back pain, the doors are going to be kicked wide open for Chiropractic to start shining.

Finally.

This is especially important for those living in small towns that are well-removed from larger cities with a wider healthcare practitioner selection.

With that in mind, I offer this latest research paper.

This one was published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. It’s brand-new (2017) and was published in November of 2017. The title of the paper is called “Management of back pain related disorders in the community with limited access to healthcare services: a description of integration of chiropractors as service providers.” and the lead author was Dr. Peter Emary.

Why They Did It

The authors of this paper wanted to attempt to evaluate the value of chiropractic service for back pain patients when integrated into the Canadian healthcare system in a multidisciplinary, primary care setting.

How They Did It

  • Canadian medical doctors and/or nurse practitioners began referring their back pain patients at the Community Health Center to chiropractors for treatment.
  • The information from their treatment was collected over a two-year process from January 2014 to January 2016 and consisted of questionnaires that the patients completed before they began treatment and at the conclusion of the chiropractic treatment.

What They Found

  • The questionnaires containing quality information were collected from 93 patients.
  • The mean age was 49 years old and 66% of them were unemployed.
  • 77% of the patients experienced their back pain for over a month and 68% of those described it as being constant.
  • The questionnaires used in the information collection process were the Bournemouth Questionnaire, Bothersomeness, and global improvement scales.
  • A significant majority of the patients treated with chiropractic care enjoyed outstanding improvement in their condition upon the conclusion of treatment.
  • 82% of the patients reported a significant reduction in the amount of pain medication they were taking.
  • 77% of the patients had no visits with their primary doctor while they underwent chiropractic treatment.
  • 93% of the patients were fully satisfied by the care they received while treating with a chiropractor.
  • And for the cherry on the top, the patients also completed a EuroQol5 Domain questionnaire and almost 40% reported better overall, general health improvement upon completion of chiropractic treatment.

Wrap It Up
To wrap up this article, I simply offer a quote from the paper itself,


I believe that wraps it up better than I could ever do it myself, so we will just end it right there.
Source material:

  • Emary P, et. al., “Management of Back Pain-related Disorders in a Community With Limited Access to Health Care Services: A Description of Integration of Chiropractors as Service Providers” November-December 2017(40), 9, 635-642

Just another reason to call a chiropractor TODAY!

  • Research and clinical experience shows that, in about 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, in comparison to the traditional medical model, patients get good or excellent results with Chiropractic. Chiropractic care is safe, more cost-effective, it decreases your chances of having surgery, and it reduces your chances of becoming disabled. We do this conservatively and non-surgically. In addition, we can do it with minimal time requirements and minimal hassle on the part of the patient. And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, we can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health!

https://www.amarillochiropractor.com/evidence-backed-reason-add-chiropractic/

I want you to be sure you know all about our blog and our YouTube channel. Currently, we have these entities set up under Creek Stone Integrated Care. Now, with the building of the Chiropractic Forward podcast site, how’s that going to change and how’s that going to look? I haven’t figured that part out just yet but know this, you can get your fix on all things chiropractically researched by going to amarillochiropractor.com and clicking on the blog button. Or, you can visit our youtube channel by searching Creek Stone Integrated Care in the YouTube search

Be looking for our upcoming website at chiropracticforward.com. It is not ready but it will be soon enough.

Thank you for listening. You know, sharing is caring and that’s how we get to more and more ears. If you like what you hear and you know other chiropractors or medical field professionals…..or even potential chiropractic patients….make sure you share our podcast with them. Together we can make a difference and help people get off of medication, get out of pain, and get healthier overall.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams from the Chiropractic Forward Flight deck saying upward, onward, and forward.