Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Archives - chiropracticforward Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Archives - chiropracticforward

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

The Evidence For Some Surgeries, Searching for How We Help, and Opioid vs. Non-Opioid

CF 078: The Evidence For Low Back Surgery, Searching for How We Help, and Opioid vs. Non-Opioid

Today we’re going to talk about evidence for low back surgery, we’ll talk about if spinal manipulative therapy is partyly in the brain, opioid information for back, hip, or knee osteoarthritis….what does the research say?

But first, cool like a velvet Elvis, here’s that bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg


OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have flip flopped into Episode #78

Introduction

We’re here to advocate for chiropractic while we also make your life easier using research and some good solid common sense and smart talk. 

Store

I should have in my first order of the decompression brochures in in just a few days. These dudes are going to look great. I’ll put some pics in the show notes and in the email we send out once a week to our email list. 

If you’re like me, you get tired of answering the same old questions. Well, these brochures make great ways of educating while saving yourself time and breath. They’re also great for putting in take-home folders. 

Go check them out at chiropracticforward.com under the store link. While you’re there, sign up for the newsletter won’t you? We won’t spam you. Just one email per week to remind you when the new episode comes out. That’s it. 

Personal Happenings

I’ve been asked to emcee the Texas Chiropractic Association’s President’s Gala which will be during the ChiroTexpo event in Dallas, TX on June 8th. 

I’m trying to figure out if I need to be making fun of everyone I introduce or not. Maybe I should trip them? You know we chiropractors….some of us can’t take a joke right? We’ll see how it goes. Most of the guys and gals in the TCA are pretty good with having fun. 

I always heard that people don’t join state associations because they think they’re made up of a bunch of old white dudes sitting around bitching. 

Well, not at the TCA, people. We have young people and certainly not all white. That doesn’t happen in Texas these days. We are a pretty mixed state in regard to ethnicity. We are also mixed in respect to gender. Several smart and highly capable women are either on the board or in a position of influence. Heck, we have a female going through the executive chairs starting in June. I’m excited to hear her ideas and see where we go under her direction. This girl is making it happen. She has young ones too. Nothing slows her down it seems. 

Let’s get to the topics today. 

Item #1

The first item we’re talking about is called “Randomised trial support for orthopaedic surgical procedures” authored by Hyeung Lim, Sam Adie, Justine Naylor, and Ian Harris(Lim HC 2014) and published in Plos One in June 13, 2014. 

This is an interesting one because we think that the surgical procedures we undergo have been fully validated. Fully vetted. Hell, you wouldn’t lay someone open unless it’s been researched and proven beyond a doubt to fix the issue would you? One would think so…..but…..let’s dive in a bit. 

Why They Did It

The authors wanted to investigate the proportion of orthopedic procedures supported by evidence from randomized controlled trials. Trials that compared surgical procedures to non-surgical alternatives. 

How They Did It

  • Orthopedic procedures conducted in 2009, 2010 and 2011 across three metropolitan teaching hospitals were identified, grouped and ranked
  • Searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) were performed to identify RCTs evaluating the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures
  • A risk of bias analysis was conducted for included studies using the Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias tool
  • 9,392 orthopedic procedures were performed across the index period

What They Found

Of the 83 RCTs, 23% were classified as supportive of operative intervention.23%. Twenty three percent were supportive of operative intervention. 

Only 37% of the total volume of procedures were supported by at least one RCT showing surgery to be superior to a non-operative alternative. ONLY 37% y’all. 

19.6% of the total volume of procedures were supported by at least one low risk of bias RCT showing surgery to be superior to a non-operative alternative.

Sounds crazy right? 

Of the most common orthopedic surgical interventions….the most common…..of those surgeries, less than 20% of them had a low risk of bias randomized controlled trial backing them up. 

I have some problems with cussing in my personal life but I’m determined to keep this show mostly PG-13 but man. 

That’s just shocking. Cutting people open with no better evidence than that. 

One word – two syllables. Day-um. 

The Conclusion was “The level of RCT support for common orthopaedic procedures compares unfavourably with other fields of medicine.” 

Good Lord I hope the other areas of medicince have more scientific support. 

What procedures are we talking about? Let’s be fair, we’re mostly spine people and the majority of the procedures their taling about here have nothing to do with the back. They’re talking about things like:

  • Knees
  • Hips
  • Intrnal fixation of proximal or shaft fracture of the femur
  • Ankle fracture fixation
  • Shoulder arthroscopy
  • Arthroscopy of the ankle…….no studies at all. Lol

It’s just crazy to think about. If we’re talking about evidence-based practice, is this it? 20% of our profession is about half crazy I think. Well, that’s about the same number of procedures they do that only have one RCT with low bias risk. 

Is it evidence-informed? I don’t know. That still sound awfully low to even consider it evidence-informed. 

I don’t know all of the answers and I don’t pretend to. Do what you do, but…..why they hell do they question spinal manipulation and say we have weak evidence to perform it? What? Stupid. 

Makes me want to cuss in Spanish.

Item #2

This one is just building on what we understand about what a manipulation does. It doesn’t answer any questions definitively but it does lay more groundwork for the future. 

It’s called “Spinal manipulation therapy: is it all about the brain? A current reveiew of the nurophysiological effects of manipulation.” It is authored by Gile Gyer, Jimmy Michael (never trust a guy with two first names. Especially if he’s left handed), Jame INklebarger, and Jaya Tedla. Published in the Journal of Integrative Medicine in May of 2019(Gyer G 2019). 

Hot stuff coming up

Why They Did It

While spinal manipulation has become more and more accepted after being more and more validated by research, the fact remains that we still don’t know exactly HOW it works and according to my interview with Dr. Christine Goertz in Episode 67, we are far away from having that satisfaction. The authors say there are certainly biomechanical and neurophysiological reasons for it’s effectiveness, 

The paper says, “Although both biomechanical and neurophysiological phenomena have been thought to play a role in the observed clinical effects of spinal manipulation, a growing number of recent studies have indicated peripheral, spinal and supraspinal mechanisms of manipulation and suggested that the improved clinical outcomes are largely of neurophysiological origin.”

“The body of literature reviewed herein suggested some clear neurophysiological changes following spinal manipulation, which include neural plastic changes, alteration in motor neuron excitability, increase in cortical drive and many more.” The nerual plastic changes part of that is really fascinating. It was once thought that the brain is the brain and we just start chipping away at brain cells as we age and go stupid stuff. Lol. 

They’re finding out that the brain changes. It can be trained. It can be built sort of like a muscle but in a neural sense. It’s fascinating. But that’s a different episode all together. 

I don’t have access to this full paper but, the point is, they’re trying to find out HOW we are effective through spinal manipulation and they recommend we plan for long-term follow up studies to help us determine the clinical significance of the neural responses that happen from spinal manipulation. 

Pretty interesting stuff there. 

Item #3

Last one for this week. It’s called “Effect of Opioid vs Nonopioid Medications on Pain-Related Function in Patients With Chronic Back Pain or Hip or Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: The SPACE Randomized Clinical Trial.” It was authored by Dr. Erin Krebs, MD et. al(Krebs E 2018). and published in JAMA on March 6 of 2018 so a little over a year ago. 

The question to answer here was, “For patients with moderate to severe chronic back pain or hip or knee osteoarthritis pain despite analgesic use, does opioid medication compared with nonopioid medication result in better pain-related function?”

How They Did It

They had 240 patients and found that the use of opioid vs. nonopioid medication did not result in significantly better pain-related function over 12 months. But they may have gotten some folks addicted in on the way to the conclusion. Lol. 

Basically, this study says stay away from opioids for moderate to severe chronic back pain or hip and knee osteoarthritis. the official conclusions was, “Treatment with opioids was not superior to treatment with nonopioid medications for improving pain-related function over 12 months. Results do not support initiation of opioid therapy for moderate to severe chronic back pain or hip or knee osteoarthritis pain.”

Boom. Pop. Pow.

I feel like I’m preaching to the choir here but you never know who listens. 

Speaking of that, Dr. David Graber shared with me that after his episodes with us, he got an email all the way from Switzerland from a chiropractor that was pretty jazzed by his comments and thoughts and Dr. Graber wanted me to know that we are indeed reaching folks and influencing on some level. 

I can’t tell you how incredibly satisfying that is. Every now and then, I get a little bit of encouraging feedback but honestly, not enough. You never know what the reach is. Are you enjoying the show? Are you listening regularly? Send me an email at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com and let me know. I love to hear from you guys. I really do. 

Not only is it inspirational like filling up your gas tank…..but feedback can help me direct the show in a direction that I know you guys are interested in or focused on. Feed back only helps me learn more and get better so send me an email won’t you?

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg


The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

  • Gyer G, M. J., Indlebarger J, Tedla JS, (2019). “Spinal manipulation therapy: Is it all about the brain? A current review of the neurophysiological effects of manipulation.” J Integrative Med.
  • Krebs E (2018). “Effect of Opioid vs Nonopioid Medications on Pain-Related Function in Patients With Chronic Back Pain or Hip or Knee Osteoarthritis Pain The SPACE Randomized Clinical Trial.” JAMA 319(9): 872-882.
  • Lim HC, A. S., Naylor JM, Harris IA (2014). “Randomised Trial Support for Orthopaedic Surgical Procedures.” PLoS One 9(6).

British Medical Journal Research, Surgeons Against Back Surgery, and Pediatric Chiropractic Under Attack

CF 068: British Medical Journal Research, Surgeons Against Back Surgery, and Pediatric Chiropractic Under Attack

Today we’re going to talk about a BIG new study helping us out in the British Medical Journal, we’ll talk about spinal surgeons against back surgery, and we’ll talk about pediatric chiropractic under attack. That’s a big topic right now. Especially down in Australia. 

But first, get ready to shake your tail feathers……here’s that bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have done the mashed potato right into Episode #68. Just like we were back in the 50’s. Sometimes I wonder if I was born in the wrong generation. Seriously. Speaking of, if you’d like to hear what we listen to in my office all day every day, go to Spotify and get my Old, New, Memphis & Motown Too. My profile is amarillopacc. That’s the amarillo platypus, absinthe, crustacean, crap ton. 

You’re welcome…. I’m here all week. Tip your waitresses. 

Introduction

Now, we’re here to advocate for chiropractic while we also make your life easier. 

Part of that is having the right patient education tools in your office. Tools that educate based on solid, researched information. We offer you that. It’s done for you. We are taking pre-orders right now for our brand new, evidence-based office brochures available at chiropracticforward.com. Just click the STORE link at the top right of the home page and you’ll be off and running. Just shoot me an email at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com if something is out of sorts or isn’t working correctly. 

If you’re like me, you get tired of answering the same old questions. Well, these brochures make great ways of educating while saving yourself time and breath. They’re also great for putting in take-home folders. 

Go check them out at chiropracticforward.com under the store link. While you’re there, sign up for the newsletter won’t you? We won’t spam you. Just one email per week to remind you when the new episode comes out. That’s it. 

DACO

Let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. I went on a short little spring break vacay last week so didn’t get many hours in. I got three hours I believe. The class I took was Class 3 of the Pain In The Frame series. It was over chronic shoulder pain. I have to tell you that the neurology is not something that comes naturally to me but, in the same breath, I want you to know that it is presented in a way that is finally understandable. Even by me and when it comes to hardcore neuro topics, that’s saying a lot, folks. Seriously.

And the concept is repeated repeatedly. That sounds redundant but I know you’re pickin up what I’m throwin down here. 

Dr. Anthony Nicholson who is part of the team that has set up the educational program, and who will also be a guest in the very near future here with us on the podcast, he was a neuro diplomate before getting his DACO so there is plenty of neuro but don’t let that scare you. Had I known that going in, it probably would have scared me a touch but, it’s no biggie. It’s explained very well and though I didn’t completely grasp it the first time or two it was run by me, I got by the 10th time for sure. Lol. 

I’m a slow learner. Lol. I beat myself up. I’m almost done with the whole thing and I have a 95 in the class. Trust me, I’m not a neuro guy. I hate hardcore neuro but it’s excellent stuff that you need to know and if I can do it, I promise you can too. 

Be looking for that interview with Dr. Nicholson all the way from Australia in just a couple of weeks or so.  Maybe sooner. He’s fascinating. 

Personal Happenings

If you hear something here that you really like and would like it in written form rather than spoken, just hop onto  chiropracticforward.com, find the episode, and just scroll down to copy and paste it. If you’re using it for content or on your website for some reason, just be cool and give us some credit please. I’d sure appreciate it and I’m sure the researchers we discuss would too. 

Item #1

Onward we march to the first item here. It’s a biggie and it’s brand new. It’s called “Benefits and harms of spinal manipulative therapy for the treatment of chronic low back pain: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials” and authored by Sidney Rubinstein, Annemarie de Zoete, Marienke van Middelkoop, and a herd of others[1]. It was published in the British Medical Journal on March 13th of 2019.  

Hot stuff coming through

The first thing I’ll say here is that there is a pyramid of research hierarchy out there. I’ll post it in the show notes at www.chiropracticforward.com episode #68 so go check it out.

If you look at it, you’ll see that randomized controlled trials and systematic review/meta-analysis studies are at the very top of the hierarchy. 

Well, this paper, for example, as the title says, is a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. See what I’m saying here? That’s why it’s a biggie. 

Why They Did It

They wanted to assess the benefits and harms of spinal manipulative therapy for the treatment of chronic low back pain. Ah….low back gets all the attention. Still waiting to see them get those cervical pain studies rolling. Anywhoo…..

They did a systematic review on 47 randomized controlled trials including 9,211 participants that all examined the effect of spinal manipulation or mobilization in adults over 18 years old with chronic low back pain with or without referred pain. They did not accept the studies that looked at sciatica exclusively.

What They Found

  • Moderate quality evidence suggests that spinal manipulative therapy has similar effects to other recommended therapies for short term pain relief.
  • The same quality evidence suggests a small, clinically better improvement in function. 
  • High quality evidence suggested that , compared with non-recommended therapies, SMT results in small, not clinically better effects for short term pain relief and small to moderate clinically better improvement in function. 
  • They say about half of the studies examined adverse and serious adverse events. They say most of the observed adverse events were musculoskeletal related, transient in nature, and of mile to moderate severity. 

They concluded, “SMT produces similar effects to recommended therapies for chronic low back pain, whereas SMT seems to be better than non-recommended interventions for improvement in function in the short term. Clinicians should inform their patients of the potential risks of adverse events associated with SMT.”

I have to say, when we dive a bit deeper in, while the study shines brightly on spinal manipulative therapy and its practitioners, we as chiropractors can’t lean on this thing completely for the good OR the bad. That’s because, of the 47 randomized controlled trials accepted, chiropractors were the practitioners delivering the manipulative therapy in only 16 of them. Fourteen were delivered by a PT, 6 by a medical manipulator (whatever the hell that is), 5 by a DO, 2 by a bonesetter…(that’s a real thing?) and on and on. 

So, keep that in mind. This isn’t fully representative of what chiropractors do and how effective we can be. 

Also, the techniques used in the 47 studies ranged from high velocity, low amplitude like a Diversified adjustment, to low velocity, low amplitude passive movement techniques or a combination of both of those. 

Again, not entirely representative of what we chiropractors that move the bones do. In my opinion. 

What they say down deep in the paper that, considering recent systematic reviews and information showing that SMT and massage should be considered cost-effective options for low back pain and then this study showing the effectiveness…..basically….what are we waiting for to get this rocking and rolling. OK, not their words exactly but….yeah, I said that but I said it based on their research speak. 

I am including an infographic the authors generated on this that cuts to the chase and may be something you can use for your waiting room. Go check it out. 

Great paper, very impactful, and it supersedes the recommendations that you heard us talking about from The Lancet Medical Journal back in episodes #16, 17, and 18 of this podcast. 

I’ve said it so many times and it remains a true, considering the forces and powers that have been against us for generations, if we were inherently wrong in what we do, we would have been wiped off the face of the Earth years and years ago. Yet we persist. It is my opinion that we do not persist because of creative sales, influential legislation, and millions and billions in lobbying efforts. It’s because we are right in what we do on the most basic levels. 

Item #2

Our second item this week is an interesting article I came across from painchats.com called “This Spine Surgeon says Avoid Spinal Surgery for Low Back Pain: Stop and Think Carefully about Back Surgery.” the article is written by David Hanscom, MD and linked in our show notes for episode 68 at chiropracticforward.com[2].

His actual website is https://backincontrol.com but this article was in painchats.com.

The article starts off with this, “If you’re considering having spinal surgery as the final fix for your back pain, I’d like to help you to think again about your options.

I’m a spinal surgeon and I want you to know that surgery is not your best option for recovery from low back pain.

Surgery for relieving back pain has never been shown to be effective in a stringent research study. The most careful research paper published in 2006 demonstrated that only 22% of patients were satisfied with the outcomes two years later. Essentially, all research shows consistently poor outcomes for fusion surgery performed for back pain.”

Well….all I have to say is….HALLELUJAH!!!

We are going to look back at x-rays of fusions in 10-15 years and wonder what in the hell the surgeons were thinking. Mark my words people. 

He breaks it down into reasons. I will shorten the article but please, go read the whole thing. It’s really good and makes so much sense. 

Reason #1: Fusion back surgery doesn’t help pain. I love everything about this section but in particular this quote, “We also know that disc degeneration, ruptured discs, bulging discs, arthritis, and narrowed discs have been clearly shown to NOT be the source of chronic back pain.” Thank you for some common sense, man! 

Reason #2: Increased risk of more pain after back surgery. Obviously, people having spinal back surgery want less pain so you can easily see the issue here. He says if you’re already having chronic pain elsewhere, totally unrelated to the surgical issue, you are going to develop chronic pain at the new surgical site up to 60% of the time. 

Day-um… But that ties in so nicely with the neurology I’ve learned in the DACO program. When your CNS is already hyper sensitized or up-regulated, it makes sense that new insult is going to behave this way. He also says that re-operation rates within the first year are as high as 20%. Aren’t you just ecstatic that we don’t have to deal with patients that have had failed spinal surgery from day to day in our offices? Good Lord, the surgeons can have it. I don’t want it. 

Reason #3: Other treatment options are more effective. Praise the Lord and Hallelujah once again. He ties in the new finding in neurology for chronic pain. The stuff I’ve been talking about in the DACO program. He says, “Your brain memorizes pain just like an athlete, artist, or musician learns his or her skill.”

The best example is that of phantom limb pain. There is no limb, yet, the pain persists, right? I’m hoping that in your mind you just agreed with me and said, “Right,” to yourself. 

He says that once a patient understands the neurological nature of chronic pain, it becomes solvable and the key is to shift off the painful and unpleasant circuits onto functional and enjoyable ones or create detours around them. Basically re-wiring the brain to an extent. 

I can’t encourage you all enough to go read this article. Again, I’ve linked it in the show notes so go check it. 

Item #3: Chiropractic used for in infants and pediatrics has become quite the hot topic recently. Especially with the government in Australia looking at restricting any chiropractic treatment to the point where it may not be able to be utilized in patients under the age of 12 years old if I remember correctly. 

In addition, this is expected to be spreading. If my information is correct, it’s already looking to head that way in British Columbia as well as Ontario. So, it’s worth paying attention to. 

My first advice would be this: If you want to film your adjustments and put them on the interwebs, then go for it but, when it comes to hanging newborns upside down and performing manipulations on them that make them cry out and things of that nature…..I would encourage you to do your fellow pediatric chiropractors a favor and NOT put those videos on the internet. 

Not because I think you’re wrong. I don’t mess with babies myself but that’s because I’m not trained in it and am honestly uncomfortable with it. But that doesn’t mean I think it’s wrong either. Regardless, it’s not about right or wrong as much as it is perception. Particularly the perception by people that don’t know anything about or don’t understand chiropractic at all. Especially those ignorant but then also in a seat of power and influence. 

Just don’t freaking do it, OK? That’s what I’m saying. 

With all that in mind let’s get going with this one called “Manual therapy for the pediatric population: a systematic review” authored by Carol Prevost, Brian Gleberzon, Beth Carleo, and others[3]. It was published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine on 24 of July 2018. Remember the research hierarchy pyramid and remember that this is a systematic review of 50 studies. 

What They Found

Moderate-positive overall assessment was found for 3 conditions: low back pain, pulled elbow, and premature infants. Inconclusive unfavorable outcomes were found for 2 conditions: scoliosis (OMT) and torticollis (MT). All other condition’s overall assessments were either inconclusive favorable or unclear. Adverse events were uncommonly reported. More robust clinical trials in this area of healthcare are needed.

This one is called “Utilization of Chiropractic Care in US Children and Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Study of the 2012 National Health Interview Survey” authored by Dr. Trent Peng, et. al[4]. Dr. Peng is also a member of our Chiropractic Forward private group on Facebook. Congratulations Dr. Peng!

Why They Did It

The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of chiropractic utilization and examine sociodemographic characteristics associated with utilization in a representative sample of US children and adolescents aged 4 to 17 years.

How They Did It

They analyzed data from 9,734 respondents to the 2012 National Health Interview Survey and chiropractic utilization in the past 12 months was the targeted outcome. 

What they found

They found that

  • The 12-month prevalence of chiropractic utilization in US children was 3.0%
  • The adjusted odds (95% confidence interval) of chiropractic utilization were higher among 11- to 17-year-olds

That’s just to give you an idea of how underserved the younger population is

Last thing, it’s  titled, “Change in young people’s spine pain following chiropractic care at a publicly funded healthcare facility in Canada” authored by Christian Manansala, Steven Passmore, Katie Pohlman[5], and others and published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice online on March 16, 2019. 

Hot stuff, coming up. 

That’s five articles this week. We are getting some serious schooling here right? The reason for this one was knowing that spinal pain in young people has been established as a risk factor for pain later in life, and considering the fact that recent guidelines recommend spinal manipulation and other modalities for back pain, the authors wanted to begin exploring the response to chiropractic treatment in young people with spinal pain. 

We already know it helps all of us old people but what about the kids?

The study utilized a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected quality assurance data attained from the Mount Carmel Clinic chiropractic program database. 

What they found

Young people 10-24 years old showed statistically and clinically significant improvement on the numeric scale in all four spinal regions following chiropractic management. 

The official conclusions reads as follows, “The findings of the present study provide evidence that a pragmatic course of chiropractic care, including SM, mobilization, soft tissue therapy, acupuncture, and other modalities within the chiropractic scope of practice are a viable conservative pain management treatment option for young people.”

Of course. For us that’s a duh sort of thing but, until it is written in research, you can’t treat it as a duh thing. While we think it’s an obvious conclusion, it’s not so obvious to others so thanks to these fine folks for doing the hard work and allowing all of us to stand on the shoulders of your efforts. 

This week, I want you to go forward with:

  • Big time research in medical journals keep proving you made the right decision to be a chiropractor. I know you didn’t need that validation personally but professionally, it’s a hell of a nice thing to have in our back pockets. 
  • Chronic back pain will never be cured by a surgery-first mentality and we knew that. But, our central nervous system plays as much a part in the resolution of pain as any mechanical factor plays a part in it. 
  • Pediatrics is under attack. Stop filming what you do. You’re not wrong but perception plays as much a part in the problems pediatric chiropractors are having as does any thing else. We get results in kids too but, if you don’t watch it, it’ll get taken away. Be smart. 
Chiropractic evidence-based products
Integrating Chiropractors
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

1. Rubinstein S, d.Z.A., van Middlekoop M,, Benefits and harms of spinal manipulative therapy for the treatment of chronic low back pain: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. BMJ, 2019. 364(1689).

2. Hanscom D “This Spine Surgeon says Avoid Spinal Surgery for Low Back Pain: Stop and Think Carefully about Back Surgery.”. Pain Chats, 2019.

3. Prevost C, G.B., Carleo B,, Manual therapy for the pediatric population: a systematic review. BMC Comp Altern Med, 2019. 19(60).

4. Peng T, C.B., Gabriel K,, Utilization of Chiropractic Care in US Children and Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Study of the 2012 National Health Interview Survey. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2018. 41(9): p. 725-733.

5. Manansala C, P.S., Pohlman K,, Change in young people’s spine pain following chiropractic care at a publicly funded healthcare facility in Canada. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 2019.


CF 058: The Patient Experience, Lumbar Stenosis, & Fibromyalgia 

CF 058: The Patient Experience, Lumbar Stenosis, & Fibromyalgia 

Today we’re going to talk about the patient experience being more important than your marketing, we’ll talk about some research from JAMA on lumbar stenosis, and some research on upper cervical manipulative therapy on fibromyalgia. 

But first, here’s that bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have clumsily stumbled into Episode #58 knocking lamps off of the end tables and generally making a mess of the place.

DACO

As with every week, let’s talk a bit about the DACO program and my progress. I was doing the Communication Drills but they kept referring to eLearning Episodes. So let’s break that down a bit real quick for those interested in the program. The bulk is made up of 40 Diagnostic Drills, 46 Communication Drills, and 17 eLearning Episodes. 

You get 2 hrs credit for each Diagnostic or Communication Drill and you get 3 hours credits for each eLearning Episode. 

Now, since Communication Drills kept referring to eLearning Episodes, I figured I would switch focus and go through them and then return to the Communication Drills. Still with me?

The eLearning Episodes are very much video based on a downloadable worksheet to take notes on. I take notes digitally though so I’m still getting my angle of attack down on these and how I want to best tackle them and have great notes I’m getting it figured out. 

DACO Classes

So far, I’ve taken classes on Adjusting locally and thinking globally about how a cervical adjustment can affect even the low back. The neurology is amazing. A class on blurry vision from a pain in the neck. Again, the neurology people. I don’t know how I made it day to day before this stuff. Then last weekend I took one on making sense of a headache. 

Outstanding information and all lined up to make you better, make you wiser in your decision-making, and making you a better communicator with your patients and colleagues. 

If you’re waiting to get started on the DACO, get started. I’ll be glad to help you if you’ll email me at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com

I’m about wrapped up with some cool stuff that you all may be interested in on our website at chiropracticforward.com. If you’ll go there and sign up for our newsletter on our home page, I’ll be able to let you know all about it when it’s ready to roll out.   

Great week for listens Y’all. Thank you for tuning in. Everyone loved Dr. James Lehman’s episode. That was a big one for us! If you missed it, it’s episode #55. Candy for your ears. I see that sucker being the number one listened to podcast pretty quickly. 

Onto the Discussion

Let’s get to trying to make your practice better. This first one we’ll discuss is titled, “Patient experience five times as likely to drive consumer loyalty as marketing” by Christopher Cheney with HealthLeaders(Cheney C 2018). It was published on December 28, 2018. Once again, I know you dig the new stuff. 

If you’re getting after it. If you’re hustling, then you’re marketing. Marketing isn’t something you do once, is it? Oh no, it isn’t. It’s something you do every damn day if you’re doing it effectively. It’s exhausting, isn’t it? But it can be fun too. 

Marketing

Isn’t it fascinating that just changing the color of the border on your marketing material has the potential to elicit a different behavior from the recipient? Or changing the color of the shirt that the person in the ad is wearing affects the response rate? It’s amazing. But, it’s also exhausting to contemplate all of the different combinations of possibilities of words, colors, placements, and all of that crap. 

Good grief. You could make yourself crazy and how many chiropractors usually have the budget to hire a full-time marketing person that actually had a marketing degree? Not many would be the answer you’re looking for if you were confused on that. It was more rhetorical than anything. 

Here in this article, Mr. Cheney says that the patient experience while in your office is the primary driver of patients’ consumer loyalty at health systems, hospitals, and physician practices. He based this information on a recent Press Ganey report I would normally link for you in the show notes but it looks like a bit of click bate. As in leave your email and get the report crapola and I’m not doing that to my peeps. Ain’t nobody got time for that. 

Hell, I can hardly get you guys to give ME your email address and most of you are loyal listeners! Lol. 

Consumer Loyalty

Anyway, he says that consumer loyalty is vital for not only your profit at the end of the month but also helps you take better care of long-term patients with multiple chronic illnesses. 

Hell, that’s why we got into this business; taking care of people. I have to say that if you got into this business to get rich, you’re taking the long way around buddy. Lol. Most of us got into this business to take care of people when nobody else was able to get results with them. And then hopefully keep them that way!

Here’s what raised my antennae straight up, he said, “Patient experience is FIVE TIMES more likely to influence brand loyalty than conventional marketing tools such as billboards, or television, print, or radio ads.”

WHAT?

What was that? Let me repeat that just in case my DACO talk put you to sleep. Hey, wake the hell up and listen to this. “Patient experience is FIVE TIMES more likely to influence brand loyalty than conventional marketing tools such as billboards, or television, print, or radio ads.”

That is astounding. Of course, some of you already had this figured out and being 20 + years into this dealio, I have it figured out to an extent as well but FIVE TIMES more effective than billboards, TV, print, or radio?

I did NOT have that much figured out. Do you know how I know I didn’t have all of that figured out? Well, it’s because I am spending too much damn money on all that crapola. They interviewed over 1,000 adults on this survey. 

I do have it figured out to the extent that I tell my staff that we are certainly in the healthcare business but they’re fools if they think we are not also in the customer service business. You better believe it. I tell them that I’d much rather a patient leave feeling the same but feeling great about the people they met and the experience they had here and feeling hopeful about what we can accomplish with them as opposed to them leaving my office sore because I either rushed through the appointment or thought we’d equate appointment success with a popping noise and pushed so hard that I finally got a pop sound but ended up making the patient feel worse. 

That goes for the front desk too, doesn’t it? They’re the first point of contact and the last point of contact. If they’re not friendly when people come in and greet them warmly and are very welcoming, well….we’re already behind the 8-ball there and had better make up some ground in the back of the office. And when they leave…..oh nobody likes to pay their own money out of their own pocket and they damn sure don’t like to pay it to someone they don’t like personally. 

Here is a quote from the report, “Healthcare organizations can tap the power of patient experience, the report says. “To harness that influence, providers should capitalize on the power of word-of-mouth marketing by viewing the patient experience as an essential part of their acquisition strategy. By gaining a deep understanding of what gets people talking about positive patient experiences, identifying opportunities to advance the conversation and disseminating key information, healthcare systems can naturally align the mission of delivering safe, high-quality, patient-centered care with the business of acquiring and retaining consumers.”

The Big 4

They went on to line our 4 Big One’s that should be a part of any healthcare facility’s strategy for getting and keeping patients. They were:

  1. Give every patient a voice – They’re not just talking about listening to them when they visit your office and tell you about their conditions. They describe delivering surveys via text and email as well as the standard outreach protocols. 
  2. Identify factors that drive and erode patient loyalty. They say to really know where you can improve, you gotta know positive loyalty metrics on things like the likelihood to refer or recommend your office to their network of people. Imagine man, being a former member of BNI, they teach that each person, whether they know it or not, has a network of 250 people in their lives. I get 55-65 new patients per month. That’s 13,750-16,250 potential work of mouth contacts that can either hear the good about our office or, if we allow them to catch us on bad days….that’s up to 16,250 people that can hear bad things about us. You can see why it’s so important to have positive patient experiences in your office just as often as you possibly can. Especially in the days of social media. There is no room for ego, for talking down to your patients or scolding your patients, or any of that crap. Patient-centered is more than an idea, it’s how you’d better be carrying yourself. 
  3. Use natural language processing to analyze comments. What the hell does that mean? Well, they say that it is language that allows aggregation of comments into clear brand equities and liabilities, allowing for proactive management of both experience and brand. That sounds like an overly wordy and annoying resume if I’m being honest. Basically, it’s using computers to analyze emails, customer feedback forms, surveys and things like that to identify the root cause of customer dissatisfaction or, we hope, customer satisfaction. I’d like to lead you further down this path but, obviously, I have more to learn on it myself. 
  4. Post ratings and reviews in physician profiles. Ensure that future patients have the most convenient access to all information they seek by including comments – both positive and negative. I can’t deal with negative comments. They hurt. Lol. 

Reviews

They also say that you need to be earning quality reviews online for Yelp, Google, Facebook, and all that good stuff. If you don’t know the value of reviews at this point, you just might be a lost cause. Lol. 

They also say you must address negative reviews online in a professional way while understanding that negative reviews are an opportunity to learn and improve. 

But, when it’s not right and borderline illegal, I believe it’s OK to have your attorney contact the person leaving that negative review. Here’s what happened. We offer a service. Not chiropractic but a service that a girl that treated here for some time decided she would begin offering here in town without being certified in any way to perform. 

OK, annoying for sure but then she, one of her little buddies and her boyfriend go online and leave us bad reviews for the exact same service. So there we were with 80 or so 5-star reviews. Not one negative review. And then three 1 star reviews popping up out of nowhere. Nope, she got a call from my attorney and they went away very quickly. 

Ain’t nobody got time for that crap, right? I know I don’t and I have little tolerance for people that want to try to tear down something others have built just to try to further themselves. 

Before my face gets too red and I start to stutter, let’s move onto the next topic. 

Next Paper

This next paper is called, “The addition of upper cervical manipulative therapy in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.” The lead author on this one is Ibrahim Moustafa and it was published in Rheumatology International in July of 2015(Moustafa I 2015). 

And can we just stop a second appreciate the last name Moustafa? Can we do that? Holy cow, if I had a good head of hair and a last name like Moustafa, I’d have the world on a leash ya know. But I don’t have good hair and my name is Williams (so boring) so let’s move on. 

Why They Did It

The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate and long-term effects of a one-year multimodal program, with the addition of upper cervical manipulative therapy, on fibromyalgia management outcomes in addition to three-dimensional (3D) postural measures.

It was a randomized controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. 

What They Found

The addition of the upper cervical manipulative therapy to a multimodal program is beneficial in treating patients with fibro.

I threw that one in for you Upper Cervical guys. You’re getting some love when it comes to treating fibro and I know fibro sufferers will appreciate that. 

I think, after learning more about the upper cervical spine in the DACO course, that it’s fascinating to think about. There is so much going on in the upper three segments in terms of sensorimotor and proprioception that it just blows your mind. 

Last Paper

OK, on to the last paper. This one is called “Comparative Clinical Effectiveness of Nonsurgical Treatment Methods in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial(Schneider M 2019)”. It was authored by Michael Schneider, DC, Ph.D., Carlo Ammendolia, DC (who we have covered here before for stenosis), and Donald Murphy, DC et. al. It appeared in JAMA on January 4, 2019, and here’s how it goes. 

Why They Did It

The question to answer for them was, “What is the comparative effectiveness of 3 types of nonsurgical treatment options for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis?”

Now the 3 types of protocols they tested were medical care, group exercise, and manual therapy/individualized exercise. 

The medical care consisted of medications and/or epidural injections. 

The group exercise classes were supervised by fitness instructors in senior community centers. 

The manual therapy/individualized exercise consisted of spinal mobilization (because it works and is awesome I assume), stretches, and strength training provided by chiropractors and PTs. 

A combination of manual therapy/individualized exercise provides greater short-term improvement in symptoms and physical function and walking capacity than medical care or group exercises, although all 3 interventions were associated with improvements in long-term walking capacity.

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out.

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

  • Cheney C (2018) “PATIENT EXPERIENCE FIVE TIMES AS LIKELY TO DRIVE CONSUMER LOYALTY AS MARKETING.” HealthLeaders.
  • Moustafa I (2015). “The addition of upper cervical manipulative therapy in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.” Rheum Inter 35(7): 1163-1174.
  • Schneider M, A. C., Murphy D, (2019). “Comparative Clinical Effectiveness of Nonsurgical Treatment Methods in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis A Randomized Clinical Trial.” JAMA Network Open 2(1): e186828.

CF 045: Harvard Health, Low Back Stenosis, Allergy Autism

CF 016: Review of The Lancet Article on Low Back Pain (Pt. 1)

 

CF 045: Harvard Health, Low Back Stenosis, Allergy Autism

CF 045: Harvard Health, Low Back Stenosis, Allergy Autism

As the title this week indicates, I’ve taken some files that have been gathering a little bit of dust in the dark corner and I’m bringing them out into the light.

Today we’ll talk about an article in Harvard Health, we’ll talk about low back stenosis research (something that doesn’t get a lot of attention), we’ll talk about a JAMA article on allergies and autism, and we’ll hit on a paper attempting to explain why some patients respond while others do not. 

Integrating Chiropractors

 

But first, you know what’s up, I wrote and recorded our jingle so you might as well just sit back and enjoy this candy for your ears. When you do create something, it’s going to be in EVERY show don’t ya know!! Here’s that bumper music

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have collapsed into Episode #45

OK, first thing, we should probably talk about the Texas vs. Oklahoma game that just happened this last weekend. By the time this posts, it’ll be two weeks ago but, still need to brag. What a game that was. I’m a Texas boy but either way would have been fine since most of OU’s players are from Texas anyway. I go for all of the Texas teams. 

I want to thank Kyle Swanson for the shout out on the Forward Thinking Chiropractic Alliance group a couple weeks ago. He’s a Texas A&M Aggie. Look, like I said, I root for A&M too so we would probably be buddies in the real world if I’m guessing out loud. 

Front Desk Staffing

Let’s get to the ongoing saga of hiring a new front desk staff. If you’ve been following along, you’ll remember that hiring a new front desk staff member has been nothing but a soup sandwich. 

Messy. Gloppy, Unreal and confusing. Those are just some words I’m laying on you. I have more words for what we’ve been through on this deal but then my podcast would have an explicit designation and I try to keep it clean around here. 

But, I believe progress has been made. We seem to have a new one that seems to be on top of her game. If she’s a “sticker,” then the search may very well be over. Of course, she’s not young which is probably why she’s a sticker so far. She’s closer to my age than any of the others have been. I’m not saying that young people have no work ethic…..I’m just saying that all of the young people that we interviewed for this job have no work ethic. 

That sounds like I’m against young people, millennials, blah blah blah. I’m not. I have had some VERY intelligent and capable young people come through here as employees over the years. There are very smart, very talented young folks out there. We just didn’t encounter any of them for this round of hiring. That’s all I’m saying. 

Moving on

October has really taken off in terms of listens for the podcast. I can only guess you’re sharing episodes here and there with your network. To that, I say thank you. If I ever see you somewhere and you tell me you have been sharing my stuff, and hold your hands out like, “bring it in big boy,” well then…you’re getting a hug my friend.

I’m a hugger. Which can probably be scary if you don’t know me. I’m 6’4” and like 280 so….big guy coming through! But, those that know me know that I’m a teddy bear. Unless you try to steal my food. Then it’s pretty much on at that point. 

On to the research

Let’s get on with trying to make your practice better. When your practice is better, your life is better. 

Let’s start with the Harvard Article. It was published in November 2017. I have it linked at chiropracticforward.com for you all in the show notes for episode 45. The name of the article is “Where to turn for low back pain relief[1]” and I couldn’t find the name of the author so there ya go. 

https://www.health.harvard.edu/pain/where-to-turn-for-low-back-pain-relief

The subtitle of this Harvard Medical journal….medical journal……is this: in most cases, a primary care doctor or chiropractor can help you resolve the problem. What the hell??? It seriously says that in a Harvard Medical article. I’m trying to catch my breath here. Sorry…..

It was published in November of 2017. The article says that there are many causes of low back pain and some of the most common is an injury to muscles or tendon which we know is called a strain and then injury to back ligaments which we call a sprain. And then there are herniated or bulging discs. 

Going through the DACO program tells me that the prevalence between disc, facet, and SI joint pain stands at 40% for the disc, 30% for the facet, and 22.5% for the SI joint pain. BUT….over the age of 50 years old, it flips a little and the Facet joint gains prevalence over disc or SI pain. Just some nuggets to tuck away in your nugget pouch. 

This article just blows me away when it gets to the “Where to Turn” subtitle. Beneath this subheader, it says, “Since you shouldn’t try to diagnose your own back pain, make your first call to a professional who can assess your problems, such as a primary care physician or a chiropractor.”

Both can serve as the entry point for back pain says Dr. Matthew Kowalski who serves as a chiropractor with the Other Clinical Center for Integrative Medicine at the Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital. 

What the hell is happening here? Am I in the Twilight Zone where everything is flipped and the medical world finally gets it?

The article goes on to say “A well-trained chiropractor will sort out whether you should be in their care or the care of a physical therapist or medical doctor.”

And here’s the difference between evidence-based/patient-centered chiropractors and those that are not. 

The more not evidence-based amongst us, the ones that drive a billion people through their doors for everything from allergies to whatever…..they will not typically be turning those patients over to the medical doctor or the PT. 

Moving to the next paper, it’s called “Comprehensive Nonsurgical Treatment Versus Self-directed Care to Improve Walking Ability in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Randomized Trial” authored by Carlo Ammendolia, et. al. It’s all about low back stenosis. This paper is co-authored by DCs, AND MDs. It was published in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation on October 27, 2017[2]. 

Why They Did It

They wanted to the effectiveness of a comprehensive nonsurgical training program to a self-directed approach in improving walking ability in low back stenosis.

How They Did It

  • It was a randomized controlled trial
  • It was done in an Academic hospital outpatient clinic
  • Participants suffered neurogenic claudication
  • MRI confirmed lumbar spinal stenosis
  • Subjects were suffering low back stenosis and randomized

What They Found

The conclusion stated, “A comprehensive conservative program demonstrated superior, large, and sustained improvements in walking ability and can be a safe nonsurgical treatment option for patients with neurogenic claudication due to LSS”

Low back stenosis can be helped

Dr. Ammendola has an amazing lumbar spinal stenosis program and training course. I have not personally taken it just yet but, it’s on my list after I finish up the DACO program. It comes HIGHLY recommended and this paper shows us why. 

Trucking on, this one is called “Do participants with low back pain who respond to spinal manipulative therapy differ biomechanically from nonresponders, untreated controls or asymptomatic controls?” It was published in Spine Journal in September of 2015 and authored by Wong, et. al. [3]

Why They Did It

To determine whether patients with low back pain (LBP) who respond to spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) differ biomechanically from nonresponders, untreated. Some, but not all patients with low back pain report improvement after a visit to the chiropractor. Why does that happen?

What They Found

After the first SMT, SMT responders displayed statistically significant decreases in spinal stiffness and increases in multifidus thickness ratio sustained for more than 7 days; these findings were not observed in other groups.

Wrap It Up

Quote, “Those reporting post-SMT improvement in disability demonstrated simultaneous changes between self-reported and objective measures of spinal function. This coherence did not exist for asymptomatic controls or no-treatment controls. These data imply that SMT impacts biomechanical characteristics within SMT responders not present in all patients with LBP.”

And our last one this week comes to us from JAMA, also known as the Journal of the American Medical Association. This one is called, “Association of Food Allergy and Other Allergic Conditions With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children.[4]” It was authored by Guifeng, et. al. and published in 2018. Again, these papers are cited in the show notes at chiropracticforward.com under episode 45 so check them out yourself please. 

The question they attempt to answer here is, “What are the associations of food allergy and other allergic conditions with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children?”

They say in the paper that Common allergic conditions, in particular, food allergy, are associated with autism among US children, but the underlying mechanism for this association needs further study.

The study was a population-based, cross-sectional study used data from the National Health Interview Survey collected between 1997 and 2016

The conclusion was quote, “In a nationally representative sample of US children, a significant and positive association of common allergic conditions, in particular, food allergy, with ASD was found.”

They now need to find out the cause and underlying mechanisms so they can attempt to reverse the upswing of autism here in America. 

So….it appears maybe it’s not all due to vaccines after all. 

Integrating Chiropractors

That wraps it up for us this week. I hope you enjoyed it. Research can be boring but, it can be fascinating too when you allow it to help guide your thought process when you are approaching your daily tasks and deciding on treatment options for your patients. 

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability.

It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. School, H.M., Where to turn for low back pain relief. Harvard Health Publishing, 2017.

2. Ammendolia C, Comprehensive Nonsurgical Treatment Versus Self-directed Care to Improve Walking Ability in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Randomized Trial, in North American Spine Society Meeting. 2017, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabiliation: Orlando, FL.

3. Wong AY, Do participants with low back pain who respond to spinal manipulative therapy differ biomechanically from nonresponders, untreated controls or asymptomatic controls? Spine, 2015. 40(17): p. 1329-37.

4. Guifeng X, Association of Food Allergy and Other Allergic Conditions With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children. JAMA, 2018. 1(2).

 

CF 016: Review of The Lancet Article on Low Back Pain (Pt. 1)