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CF 052: Chiropractic Forward Podcast Year One Review

CF 052: Chiropractic Forward Podcast Year One Review

One year. I started this podcast exactly one year ago. 52 weeks. 52 episodes. We’re going to talk about the highlights of the first year. We’re going to talk about chiropractic today vs. chiropractic when I started a year ago. Has anything changed? The short answer is yes. Quite a bit has changed in just a year. 

But first, here’s that sweet like honey bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

Welcome

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have collapsed into Episode #52 and it feels good to say that. To be able to do anything consistently for a year straight, every single week, it’s an accomplishment for sure and it sure as hell feels good folks. 

DACO Program

Before we get into the highlights. let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. For those new to the Chiropractic Forward Podcast, I have been going through the Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedists. I’m 92 hours into a 300-hour course. Ugh…that hurts just to say it. Lol. I don’t even feel close to being done. 

I figured it out that at the rate I’m going now, which is about 8 hours per week, I can be done around May I believe. While it seems way off, you know what? I’d be learning and educating myself anyway. Why not get something out of it, right? That’s the idea and May will be here before you know it. 

Hell, it seems like it was Summer just a couple of weeks ago. Lol. 

Products

I have been fast at work preparing some new options for you. I have noticed  a lack of what I would want in my office when it talks 

One-Year Anniversary

Let’s get on to talking about our one-year anniversary. I want to start by talking listen out our top 10 episodes so far and what we talked about that made everyone listen to each of them. I’m linking them all for quick reference in the show notes. So away we go!

Number 10

Episode #30 – Integrating Chiropractors – What’s It Going To Take? We discussed the medical field and what they are looking for in a chiropractor in regard to integrating that individual into the system. We went over The Lancet papers as well. Great episode to check out. 

CF 030: Integrating Chiropractors – What’s It Going To Take?

 

Number 9

Episode #25 – Vets With Low Back Pain. Usual Care + Chiropractic vs. Usual Care Alone. This episode revolved around a paper in JAMA from Dr. Christine Goertz where she and her co-authors showed additional support for including chiropractic as part of a multidisciplinary team for treating low back pain. Great paper by a great asset for chiropractic. 

CF 025: Vets With Low Back Pain. Usual Care + Chiropractic vs. Usual Care Alone

Number 8

Episode #28 – Will Chiropractic First Finally Take Its Place? In this installment, we went through a paper that showed non-pharma and non-opioid therapies are now the preference. Well, that’s chiropractic, right? We talked about some GREAT resources in this episode including the President’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and The Opioid Crisis report as well as a great paper by Jon Adams Ph called The Prevalence, Patterns, and Predictors of Chiropractic Use Among US Adults. That one had some marketing nuggets for the nugget pouch.

CF 028: Will Chiropractic First Finally Take Its Place?

 

Number 7

Episode #27 – Wanted – Safe, Nonpharmacological Means of Treating Spinal Pain. This episode went through treating spinal pain, thoracic manipulation, lumbar manipulation, guidelines from Canada, and the perceptions of our profession. We discussed a paper about how some in the medical profession think chiropractors go around herniating discs all the time. Pfft… 

CF 027: WANTED – Safe, Nonpharmacological Means Of Treating Spinal Pain

 

Number 6

Episode #9 – With Dr. Tom Hollingsworth of Corpus Christi, TX called The Case Against Chiropractic In Texas. We talked with Dr. Hollingsworth about the Texas Medical Association’s attacks on Texas Chiropractors and our rights. We talked about the latest in the current court case and the appeal process. 

Just a couple of weeks ago, in fact, this case had a decision that was reached and it wasn’t good for chiropractors. And I’m talking about chiropractors nationwide. We’ll have to do an updated episode with Dr. Hollingsworth because what may be on its way down the pike for all chiropractors…..well….let’s just say it’s no bueno. 

CF 009: With Dr. Tom Hollingsworth: The Case Against Chiropractic In Texas

 

Number 5

Episode #26 – Chiropractic Better Than Physical Therapy and Usual Medical Care For Musculoskeletal Issues. The title is accurate. And researched fact. There are some that don’t like that language. Can’t we all get along? That type of deal and yes, we can all get along. Most certainly. My issue is with PTs being the first referral for non-complicated musculoskeletal issues when research shows they have decreased effectiveness when compared to chiropractic care. 

They have less patient satisfaction when compared to chiropractic care as well. In addition, research shows chiropractic care to be a lot less expensive. So why in the hell is a practitioner that is exponentially more expensive, much less effective on their outcomes, and patients don’t like as much…..why the hell are they the first referral? That still makes my pee hot when I really really think about it. It’s dumb. 

I don’t think we should be doing post-surgical rehab unless we take specific training in that. I think PTs and DCs can work very well together but there should be lanes and I don’t think PTs stay in their lane. Not when they’re out there taking a weekend course on adjusting. It’s BS and that doesn’t stand for Bad Students. 

CF 026: Chiropractic Better Than Physical Therapy and Usual Medical Care For Musculoskeletal Issues

 

Number 4

Episode #29 – With Dr. Devin Pettiet of Tomball, TX, still the President of the Texas Chiropractic Association. This episode was titled Is Chiropractic Integration Healthy For the Profession? We talked with Dr. Pettiet all about chiropractic integration into a medical based case management or medical team. 

This one was one of my favorites too. For sure. Devin is a great resource and a great personality. He’s all energy and has an awesome amount of information and experience.

CF 029: w/ Dr. Devin Pettiet – Is Chiropractic Integration Healthy For The Profession?

 

Number 3

Episode #6 with Dr. Tyce Hergert from Southlake, TX. This episode is called Astounding expert Information on Immediate Headache Relief. This one was all about headaches and highlighted one service that was dressed up and parading around as another. Yes, those pesky PTs are moving in on us and this episode talked about little bit about that along with some great papers showing chiropractic’s effectiveness with treating headaches. Fun episode. 

CF 006: With Dr. Tyce Hergert: Astounding Expert Information On Immediate Headache Relief

 

Number 2

Episode #13 – DEBUNKED: The Odd Myth That Chiropractors Cause Strokes. My favorite episode and my favorite endeavor as far as really putting together information to stick a fork in an anti-chiropractic idea or myth. This is actually a three-part series consisting of #13, 14, and 15. All three episodes really paint a picture of foolishness on the part of the medical field and a coordinated attack that is easily put to rest through common sense, correct context, and research. 

It’s really so simple when you take the time to listen, learn, and just think about it for a minute. They are the three episodes I encourage you to share the very most out of all of them I have created. 

CF 013: DEBUNKED: The Odd Myth That Chiropractors Cause Strokes (Part 1 of 3)

 

Number 1

Episode #11 – called It’s Here. New Guides For Low Back Pain That Medical Doctors Are Ignoring.

The most listened-to episode for our first year was Episode #11 once again with my old friend and colleague Dr. Tyce Hergert down in Southlake, TX. He has TWO episodes in the top 10 from our first year. That’s because he’s smart, he’s the ex-President of the Texas Chiropractic Association, and he’s entertaining if he’s had his coffee. 

In this one, we talked about current healthcare guidelines, why they matter to chiropractic patients and even non-patients, and whether MDs are getting it or not. Guess what? They’re still ignoring these guides!

CF 011: With Dr. Tyce Hergert: It’s Here. New Guides For Low Back Pain That Medical Doctors Are Ignoring

 

Wrap Up

So….there you have it, folks. That’s our Top 10 in a nutshell with all of the links in the show notes. We have had a great first year. We hope you have enjoyed the content we have been bringing to you as much as we have enjoyed gathering it for you. 

There is so much going on in our profession. Both good and bad. It’s important to stay plugged in now more than ever. We’ll talk about it in a future episode but the Texas Chiropractors lost their appeal and the medical kingdom will bring their dog and pony show to your state before you know it. Believe me. 

But, for evidence-based chiropractors, there’s still no better time than today to be a doctor of chiropractic. I firmly believe that to be the truth.

Integrating Chiropractors

 

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point: 

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

Twitter

YouTube

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

CF 051: Necks, Integrity of the Cervical Spine, and the CDC on Opioids

CF 051: Necks, Integrity of the Cervical Spine, and the CDC on Opioids

Today we’re going to talk about the reliability of clinical tests assessing the cervical spine, what is happening when adjusting a neck as far as the integrity of the cervical spine, and what the CDC says about opioids. It’s all fascinating all the time here at the Chiropractic Forward Podcast 

But first, here’s that bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have drifted all slow and gently into Episode #51

DACO

As has become the tradition, let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. DACO stands for Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedist. Trudging along. I’m up to I believe 84 of the required 300. Classes this last week were on frozen shoulder, piriformis syndrome, Important aspects of lumbar MRI, and inguinal pain. 

This stuff is just invaluable, folks. I’m an organizational freak but at the end of each course, I’ll make myself a quick sheet that I can reference when something like that comes through the door. I think making these little quick sheets will really help to get some of the more rare or difficult cases figured out quickly. 

I’ve already put the lumbar differential diagnosis sheet to use a few times as well as the dizziness quick sheet I created. I have shared several times here that I don’t sit around a lot either at work or at home. I’m a busy bee. 

Vacation & Hobbies

Going on vacation, don’t even try to take me to a beach. If my wife wants to go to the beach, that’s all her. I’ll tag along and I’ll check in on her out there reading a book from time to time but, for the most part, I’ll be off doing, seeing, and experiencing. The ability to sit still and just relax…..that’s an ability I did not receive in this lifetime. 

As a result, I make live edge furniture. Go to Facebook and look up Amarillo live edge and custom furniture. I am a sculpture and charcoal artist. Go back to Facebook now and look up River Horse Art Gallery. I’m in the process of teaching myself to paint right now too. I also am a singer/songwriter. Go back to Facebook once again. Yes, once again and look up Flying Elbows Perspective.

Crazy name indeed. 

So, here’s the point. It’s not to brag or pump my tires. The point is that this is how important I’ve found the DACO program to be. While I haven’t completely put everything else on hold, the DACO has taken priority of my time. One reason is that I want to motor through it quickly and efficiently. The next reason would be that I’ll be the only DACO in all of Texas West of the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex. 

What does that get me? Maybe a pat on the back. Maybe a part time or full-time gig on staff at an FQHC. As we have mentioned in previous episodes, there are reports of DCs on FQHC staffs making as little as $120/visit up to $300/visit on even Medicaid visits. Unbelievable. But you have a better shot at getting into the system when you are specialized AKA – a Diplomate. 

Just a part of making us all better. You guys and gals need to be looking at this stuff. 

Before we hop into the papers for the week, I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. I think I have some pretty cool stuff coming down the pike you’ll be interested in. That’s in you enjoy evidence-based education.

Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

Paper #1

The first paper here is called “Reliability and validity of clinical tests to assess the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders: Part 1—A systematic review from the Cervical Assessment and Diagnosis Research Evaluation (CADRE) Collaboration” It was done my Madege Lemurnier et. al. and published in the European Spine Journal in September 2017[1]. 

Why They Did It

With a title as long as that one, what the heck are they doing here? They say they were hoping to determine the reliability of clinical tests to assess the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders. 

How They Did It

They updated the systematic review of the 2000-2010 Bone and Joint Decade Task Forst on Neck Pain and Associated Disorders. 

They searched the literature for studies on the reliability and validity of Doppler velocimetry to evaluate the cervical arteries. 

They had two independent evaluators look through it all

What They Found

  • Preliminary evidence showed that the extension-rotation test may be reliable and has adequate validity to rule out pain arising from facet joint. Or rule in I suppose. Just in case you are unaware of the cervical extension-rotation test, it’s exactly as it sounds. Have the patient extend and then rotate toward the side you’re testing. When you combine this maneuver with palpation you can typically get a good idea of whether the patient is suffering from a facet issue. You need to know that this test is also effective in sniffing out a low back facet issue as well. Lumbar extension and then rotation can give you some good clues sometimes.
  • The evidence suggests variable reliability and preliminary validity for the evaluation of cervical radiculopathy including neurological examination (manual motor testing, dermatomal sensory testing, deep tendon reflexes, and pathological reflex testing), Spurling’s and the upper limb neurodynamic tests.
  • No evidence found for doppler velocimetry. 

Wrap It Up

Little evidence exists to support the use of clinical tests to evaluate the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders. We found preliminary evidence to support the use of the extension–rotation test, neurological examination, Spurling’s and the upper limb neurodynamic tests.

Paper#2

On to our second paper. This one is called “Intervertebral kinematics of the cervical spine before, during, and after high-velocity low-amplitude manipulation” and appeared in Spine Journal in August of 2018 and was authored by Dr. William J. Anderst, et. al[2].

Why They Did It

Since cervical manipulation is such a common intervention for neck pain, the authors wanted to characterize the forces involved and the facet gapping that takes place during manipulation. 

How They Did It

It was a laboratory-based prospective observational study

It included 12 patients 

Each patient had acute mechanical neck pain

One of the outcome measurements was the neck pain rating scale (NPRS)

Other measurements were taken for amount and rate of cervical facet joint gapping 

What They Found

The authors concluded, “This study is the first to measure facet gapping during cervical manipulation on live humans. The results demonstrate that target and adjacent motion segments undergo facet joint gapping during manipulation and that intervertebral ROM is increased in all three planes of motion after manipulation. The results suggest that clinical and functional improvement after manipulation may occur as a result of small increases in intervertebral ROM across multiple motion segments.”

Pretty cool stuff. 

Paper #3

Our last paper for this episode is called, “CDC: Drug overdoses hit new record.” It’s an article on thehill.com written by Nathaniel Weixel and was published on August 15th of this year, 2018[3]. 

The article leads off saying that 72,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2017 and that’s based on information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That is a new record folks and we have our friends in the medical realm to thank for it. 

Who’s To Blame?

Now, that, of course, doesn’t mean pharmacists and medical doctors are bad and there was a mass conspiracy to cause this deal. But it does mean that SOME of them are bad. SOME doctors are doing time in an orange outfit right now because they knew better but the dollar was mightier than common sense and common decency. 

There were pharmacies dispensing 100x more than their population could ever consume but they want to not refer to us and talk about the integrity of the cervical spine. That kind of crap is what got us here.

But, it’s also what has brought chiropractors from the shadows into the light. When you have the mess the medical field has created, then you have to start looking for the non-pharma solutions and we are it. 

Comparison

72,000 deaths. You ever heard of the Vietnam War? Of course, you have. We all have. Some either remember or have seen what a big deal it was. The deaths, the protests, the loss. I’ve been to the Vietnam Wall in Washington DC several times. It’s profound. It’s stunning to see all of those names. 

Just to compare, the total number of those lost in Vietnam stands at 58,220. Now keep in mind, that takes into account deaths from as early as 1956 all the way up to as late as 2006 and comes from Defense Casualty Analysis System Extract Files from The Vietnam Conflict Extract Data File. 

I did my homework. I’m not giving you fake numbers here. 

Essentially, 13,780 more deaths happened because of opioids, In just one year. In just 2017. That doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface when you start totaling up 2016, 2015, and further back. Unbelievable isn’t it? 

If we look at it, 2014 had 28,647 deaths, 2015 had 33,100 deaths, 2016 saw 63,632 deaths…..and then 72,000 in 2017. 

I’m guessing you can see the trend. Hell yes, it’s an epidemic.

The Math

I’ll do the math for you because I love you and I’m glad you’re here and I don’t want you to have to think too hard while you’re giving me your time. Over the last 4 years, that’s approximately 200,000 opioid-related deaths. 197,379 to be more specific. 

The genie seems to be out of the bottle.

While we can’t put the genie back in, we can offer solutions for the future. Many of those addicted to opioids became addicted due to spinal surgery. Many of those surgeries were unnecessary. One paper I reviewed showed that approximately 5% of lumbar fusions are necessary making about 95% of the unnecessary. Yeah….95%. 

The Answer

We have the answer people. The American College of Physicians, The White House, The Lancet, 2 papers in JAMA, Consumer Report surveys, The Joint Commission, The FDA…..seriously, there is not one reason that we aren’t inundated by spinal pain referrals at this very moment. No reason at all. It actually makes me mad as hell that we are not. 

Exactly what the hell does it take to make general practitioners, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants understand that an evidence-based chiropractor is best situated to help these people as a first-line therapy?

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

Twitter

YouTube

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the Author and Host:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

CF 013: DEBUNKED: The Odd Myth That Chiropractors Cause Strokes (Part 1 of 3)

CF 012: Proven Means To Treat Neck Pain

CF 041: w/ Dr. William Lawson – Research For Neck Pain

CF 050: Chiropractic Care – Text Neck, Headaches, Migraines

 

 

 

Bibliography

1. Lemeunier N, Reliability and validity of clinical tests to assess the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders: Part 1—A systematic review from the Cervical Assessment and Diagnosis Research Evaluation (CADRE) Collaboration. Euro Spine J, 2017. 26(9): p. 2225-2241.

2. Anderst W, Intervertebral kinematics of the cervical spine before, during, and after high-velocity low-amplitude manipulation. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2018. 0(0).

3. Weixel N. CDC: Drug overdoses hit new record. The Hill 2018  5 August 2018]; Available from: https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/401961-cdc-drug-overdoses-hit-new-high-in-2017.

 

 

CF 050: Chiropractic Care – Text Neck, Headaches, Migraines

CF 050: Chiropractic Care – Text Neck, Headaches, Migraines

Today we’re going to talk about headaches, migraines, neck pain, and our favorite topic here at the Chiropractic Forward Podcast, yes….we’ll talk about Chiropractic care. Specifically, chiropractic care for the headaches, migraines, and neck pain. 

Hold on though, make way, get in the Soul Train dance line because here’s that bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have skidded all fast and furiously into Episode #50

Let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. For those that don’t know, that’s the Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedists program I’m slowly trudging through. 

I say slowly. You have 3 years to finish. But, I’m a doer if you can’t tell. I’m a worker bee if you will. When I start something, I want to finish. I don’t like unfinished bidness. I don’t like things flapping out in the wind. I want to start it and then I want to finish it quickly and move on to the next thing. 

Getting 300 hours is never going to get done quickly. Especially when you are the sole doctor in a busy practice not getting home until 7 pm or even later sometimes. Such is my life. A curse and a blessing depending on the day and my outlook on that particular day. 

However, I believe I’m on a path to finish it up in about a year from when I started. Probably much sooner. For example, I knocked out 12 hours last week. That’s pretty solid but, we had a snow day and I took advantage of being stuck at home. 

I crawled down into my basement man cave, got in my blankie and jammies with an iPad on my belly, leaned the recliner back and got some education. 

So far, I have 40 hours of the 250 online hours done and 40 hours of the 50 live hours required. In total, I’m 80 hours into a 300-hour course. Rocking and rolling folks. Rocking and rolling. 

Some of the more recent courses I’ve completed were hip pain in children, joint hypermobility disorders, TMJ, and thoracic outlet syndrome. These courses are fascinating. 

The offer is there. If you need help getting started on yours, send me an email at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com I’ll be glad to get you on your way. 

Speaking of getting in touch, I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. It makes everything easier. 

Now onto a discussion that took place on our Facebook page a couple of weeks ago that I thought was particularly interesting. 

I will put it in the show notes for you if you’d like to see the meme….funny word. My son loves it when we mispronounce it. You should try it with your kids if they’re old enough to get embarrassed by their parents.  

Anyway, the picture I posted was of a contemplative Kermit the Frog and it said, “Me when a patient tells me another chiropractor wanted 5 sets of x-rays over 9 months of treatment to correct something research doesn’t support.”

Now, let me set the stage here. The impetus for this was that one of my patients moved down to Georgia. Her daughter started having some headaches and pain so she went and got an MRI. 

The results of the MRI showed the issue to be out of the scope of chiropractic. Regardless, you guessed it, she got a recommendation for 5 sets of x-rays over 9 months of treatment. 

Absolute scare care riduculosity. 

Here’s where it got a little sticky. A colleague got on that post and expressed some dissatisfaction that I would post something like that. I guess he didn’t like my airing dirty laundry. Which is cool. I don’t mind at all but here’s what happened for me on the deal. 

I sat down and crafted a very PC response I think and in doing so, I had an opportunity to reflect on the podcast, the reason for it, and what we’ve done in just the past year. 

Here are some highlights that came to mind for me:

  1. You don’t make an omelet without cracking some eggs and I think some difference of opinion is to be expected and it’s something I just need to get used to. 
  2. I think I created this podcast to do whatever I could to move this profession forward. 
  3. Forward to me means providing research like we do every week but also to educate others, to suggest new research avenues, to encourage specialization and higher education, to push for integration, and to call out and discourage the behavior I feel holds us back from moving forward. 

If you aren’t active on our Facebook page, I’d encourage you to stop in and say, “Hi.” Tell us if you’re digging the podcast. Share some research you’ve found. Maybe give us a suggestion for a future podcast. We’re here. We also have a private Facebook group if you’d like to join the private group. 

OK, research for this week, here we go with paper #1

This one is called “Characteristics of Chiropractic Patients Being Treated For Chronic Low Back and Neck Pain[1].” The lead author is PM Herman and the paper was published in August of 2018 in the Journal of Manipulative Physiological Therapeutics. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30121129

Get your marketing hat on for this one people. 

Why They Did It

Since chronic low back and neck pain are so prevalent, and since spinal manipulation is a common non-pharma treatment for them, the authors wanted to determine the characteristics of the type of patient that visits the chiropractor. 

How They Did It

  • They collected data from chiropractic patients in regard to regions and states, sites, providers and clinics, and patients. 
  • The data was collected through an iPad questionnaire given at the chosen sites. 
  • They had 518 chronic low back pain patients complete it while 347 chronic neck pain patients finished theirs. They also had 1159 do both. 

What They Found

  • Most of the sample were highly-educated
  • Most were non-hispanic
  • White females were the dominant demographic for race and gender
  • Few used narcotics
  • Avoiding surgery was the most important reason they chose chiropractic care 
  • Over 90% of the patients reported high satisfaction with their care

That should give you some good ideas when trying to figure out who you should be marketing to. I can lead the horse to water but I cannot show the snout into the pond and make the horse drink it up. 

Text Neck

I picked this one out because I saw a discussion on Facebook last week about Text Neck. The question posed was, isn’t text neck just a new term for an old problem? Is text neck just a scare tactic?

That was the general gist of the post. 

While I did not respond, I do have an opinion on text neck. I do not think it’s an old problem. I mean, let’s back up a bit. Poor posture is most certainly an age-old problem. No doubt about it. 

However, at no other point in our time in history that I’m aware of, have little bitty children all the way up to mid-aged and elderly people had a reason to be sitting in one spot for hours with their head flexed forward, bent down almost into their laps. It pains me to see some of the kids these days. 

My poor son. Not so much my daughter right now but my son….my goodness. That kid…I’ll look at him sometimes and he has somehow balled himself up into what I can only describe as something resembling a roly-poly or an armadillo. His head bent at 90 degrees looking at his phone in his lap. Basically, the epitome of text neck.

It must really suck being a chiropractor’s kid. I’ve taken pictures of it before when he wasn’t looking. As you probably know, you can draw on pictures on your phones. So I took that picture then drew big red marks exploding out of his neck. Then, while he’s sitting there on his phone, he gets the picture in a text. 

It’s awesome. You all should try it sometime if for no other reason than to give yourselves a laugh. 

Next Paper

This paper is called, “Cervical Proprioception in a Young Population Who Spend Long Periods on Mobile Devices: A 2-Group Comparative Observational Study” and it was published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics as well[2]. The lead author was Andrew Portelli and it was published in February of 2018. 

https://www.jmptonline.org/article/S0161-4754(17)30010-6/fulltext?elsca1=etoc&elsca2=email&elsca3=0161-4754_201802_41_2_&elsca4=Physical%20Medicine%20and%20Rehabilitation%7CHealth%20Professions

Why They Did It

The purpose of this study was to evaluate if young people with insidious-onset neck pain who spend long periods on mobile electronic devices (known as “text neck”) have impaired cervical proprioception and if this is related to time on devices.

What They Found

“The participants with text neck had a greater proprioceptive error during cervical flexion compared with controls. This could be related to neck pain and time spent on electronic devices.”

This message has been brought to you by an uncool parent of a teenager. 

Paper #3

This one is called, “Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial[3].” and it was published in Spine journal in February of 2018. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29481979/

Why They Did It

The optimal number of visits for the care of cervicogenic headache with spinal manipulative therapy is unknown so the authors hoped to identify the dose-response relationship between visits and chronic headache outcomes…. and to evaluate the efficacy of chiropractic by comparison with a light-massage control.

What They Found

The authors’ conclusion was as follows, “There was a linear dose-response relationship between SMT visits and days with CGH. For the highest and most effective dose of 18 SMT visits, CGH days were reduced by half and about 3 more days per month than for the light-massage control.”

So, you guys and gals that want to take evidence-based to the extreme and get people out of your office in only 3 or 4 visits, you may not be hitting the number of visits that work the best. Everyone is different right? Everyone heals differently. Here we have 18 visits being the most effective for chronic cervicogenic headache. 

Good info to keep in mind. 

Integrating Chiropractors

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point: Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

Twitter

YouTube

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

1. Herman PM, Characteristics of Chiropractic Patients Being Treated for Chronic Low Back and Neck Pain. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2018.

2. Portelli A, Cervical Proprioception in a Young Population Who Spend Long Periods on Mobile Devices: A 2-Group Comparative Observational Study. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2018. 41(2): p. 123-128.

3. Haas M, Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial. Spine, 2018: p. S1529-9430.

CF 012: Proven Means To Treat Neck Pain

CF 033: Did You Need Proof That Chiropractors Help Headaches?

CF 005: Valuable & Reliable Expert Advice On Clinical Guides For Your Practice

 

 

CF 049: The Palmer/Gallup Poll 2018 Discussion On Chiropractic Marketing

CF 049: The Palmer/Gallup Poll 2018 Discussion On Chiropractic Marketing

Today we’re going to talk about the 2018 version of the Palmer Gallup poll that has some great info including some chiropractic marketing nuggets for your nugget pouch so stick around as we get into the details

But first, make way for that sweet sweet bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

Introduction

You have crumpled into Episode #49. Info to help with your chiropractic marketing. We are moving in on a solid year of Chiropractic Forward episodes and that feels good. Every single week. We haven’t missed one week this past year. There is most certainly a sense of accomplishment and doesn’t it feel good to feel good? Of course, it does. 

The Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedists (DACO)

Let’s talk a bit about the DACO program – Same as last week. Just trudging along. Last week I took classes on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, poster canal, anterior and horizontal canals, Epley’s maneuver and all that goes along with that. I also had a class on Lumbar spinal stenosis that I learned some new tidbits on. Great stuff. My offer stands, if any of you want to start looking at it, I’d be glad to give you a little guidance in getting yourself started. 

Newsletter

How’s about youse guys head over to chiropracticforward.com and get yourself on our newsletter. I have some cool stuff coming down the pike and I want you to be the first to know about it and I want you to save money because you were cool enough to be on our email list. No more than once a week. That’s my guarantee. It’s just an email address folks. Not a big deal. 

Personal happenings

You have heard my woes and my front desk worries over the past month or two. I told you last week that it appears my wife has herself a new full-time gig and guess what? With her help, we had not only one of the best Octobers we have ever had, but we also had one of the best months (numbers-wise) that we have ever had in 20 years. 

I believe there’s something to this “wife working the front desk” idea people. Something to think about for sure. If you can work with your wife or husband that is. You may have to pee strategically around the office just to mark your territory and let it be known this is your domain but, nobody will work as hard for the office as someone that has a vested interest in it. I’m a firm believer in that. 

Into The Information

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

This week I want to talk about the Palmer/Gallup poll that has been coming out annually for a couple of years now. I think it’s two years but cannot recall off the top of my head. 

Regardless, let’s talk about the 2018 version. I look forward to its release every year because you can get some chiropractic marketing ideas from it if you’re looking at it the right way. 

The Ideal Patient

Any time you start a new generic chiropractic marketing program, they have you create your ideal avatar or your ideal customer. The customer that not only comes in and you love to see them come through the door but the customer that is coming in and paying good money to see a good doctor. The people that love you and go out into the world to tell everyone every good thing they can about you and the ones that are the first to leave you a great Google review. 

THAT’S the ideal patient, isn’t it? If we could only fill up our offices with that specific, amazing person all day every day. We’d never even think about giving up our practices and moving to an exotic place with umbrellas and funny drinks. Chiropractic marketing would be non-existent. 

Well, we may still think about doing that but it wouldn’t occupy as much brain space if these people were all that ever came through our door. 

Don’t we just love seeing these perfect patients? Smiles, good vibes, and excitement. And sometimes food!! I have one bring us pumpkin spiced cake and sugar cookies last week. We need to work on a nutritional talk for sure but you get the point. 

On To The Poll

I am linking the poll in the show notes so go check it out Episode 49 at chiropracticforward.com

http://www.palmer.edu/uploadedFiles/Pages/Alumni/gallup/palmer-gallop-annual-report-2018.pdf

The first thing we really get into here is the Summary and I think that’s really where we are going to stay instead of going too deep in because we’ll wind up with a 4 hour episode and I don’t want that any more than you do so let’s hit the high spots and call it good. 

  1. Neck and back pain is common among adults in the US – yes, we knew that now didn’t we? They say about 2/3 of US adults (62% to be specific) have had neck or back pain that was significant enough that they saw a healthcare professional for care at some point in their lifetime, including 25% who did so in the last 12 months. 
  • 25% of the population sought care in the last year for pain. I bet 25% did not seek care for wellness. 

2. 80% of American adults prefer to see an expert in spine care for neck and back conditions rather than a general medicine professional who treats anything and everything. I think we all know who the experts are right? It’s us….

He’s a problem though, 67% of them prefer to see someone that can prescribe medication or surgery to treat neck or back pain.  Only 28% want to see someone that does not use prescription medication or surgery. That one is a bit of a kick to the nether region. I thought we were making more progress on that front. 

I can’t tell if the next point contradicts the previous one or not. You decide. They say that prescription pain meds aren’t preferred as first-line care for about 79%. I can only guess they are preferring a practitioner that can prescribe just in case it declines to the point of needing it but they don’t necessarily want to start with pills? Maybe…..

3. When it comes to healthcare providers, people say that chiropractic doctors and medical doctors are the top choices for neck or back pain care. In the last year, 62% say a medical doctor while 53% saw a chiropractic doctor. 

Peel Back The Layers

Going a little deeper there, 34% say a PT and 34% visited a massage therapist. 

I think it’s of important note here that half of the people that went to the chiropractor went because they said that chiropractors provide the most effective treatment for their pain. That’s pretty damn awesome right there. We’ll get to the other half here in just a minute. 

The overwhelming feeling in this subsection is the keyword is “EFFECTIVENESS.” Can you say, “Chiropractic Marketing Nugget?” How effectively can you relay your effectiveness? 

I would offer to you the idea that this podcast is an EXCELLENT way to speak about your effectiveness as well as to back up your effectiveness. You just have to listen and you have to take what you learn and turn that into kick-butt content and marketing material. 

Since not everyone is particularly gifted at chiropractic marketing or creating content, we are working on helping you out in that aspect. Stick with us. It’ll happen. Just go to  chiropracticforward.com and get on the email list to stay on top of that. 

Outside of ‘effectiveness,’ SAFETY was another reason people chose chiropractors and PTs for their back and neck pain. In fact, about half of those coming to the chiropractor said safety was why they chose chiropractic.

So, we have the big TWO reasons. Only two. That people go to chiropractors nationwide. They are Effectiveness and Safety. That should be useful information for you guys and gals to take and run with. Chiropractic marketing at its best. 

Next point

4. The fourth point of the summary was types of care. They found a lot of people utilizing self-management at home, as they should. They say 53% of American adults went to get massages to control pain. They say 47% had chiropractic care for their pain. And 42% went to a PT. 

That means we have a lot of people doing more than one thing right? It would make perfect sense to not be a one-trick pony in your practice. For instance, the subluxation guys and gals only adjust. They’ll see a patient 100 times a year and only adjust. Nothing else.

Oh wait, I lie. There’s a local guy here that will pray over each one before using the activator on them all so I guess it’s a little more than just the adjustment. 

I don’t want to make light of prayer. I’m a Christian and am well aware of the power of prayer but when it’s done after joining Body By God type management programs, well, it just seems a bit disingenuous doesn’t it? If we’re being honest?

Anyway, if you have to see someone that many times a year, you’re probably a terrible chiropractor and you’re probably doing more damage than you are doing good.

Diversifying

Back to doing more than one thing: it’s clear that patients are not looking for just an adjustment. It appears they’re looking for chiropractic, they’re looking for massage, they’re looking for some exercise/rehab considering 72% were looking into yoga. 

Although it’s not in this article, I believe many are looking for acupuncture these days. As discussed earlier, they may potentially be looking for meds so why couldn’t you offer anti-inflammatories like turmeric or Boswellia just to name a few. I say this because this poll showed that 73% of people took an over the counter medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Definitely food for thought. 

5. Patient Experiences

Patients that visited a chiropractor, a PT, or an MD over the last year said they received a high level of care. That’s good news. 

For chiropractors specifically, 9 out of 10 patients said

  • The chiropractor listened to them
  • DCs provided convenient and quick care
  • We demonstrated caring and compassion
  • The chiropractor explained things well
  • And they spent the right amount of time with them

Approximately 90% of patients had all of that to say about chiropractic doctors. That’s outstanding news, folks. That means that we can fight amongst ourselves and, while I would argue the straights are keeping us from full integration, in the eyes of patients, almost ALL of us are doing a good job!

For Physical Therapists, overall, they were hitting around the 83%-86% area. 

For MD’s, they didn’t do too well honestly. But didn’t we expect that? Here’s how they fared:

  • 72% say their MD listens
  • 67% said they often explain things well
  • 66% said they demonstrate care and compassion
  • 53% said they have quick access and are convenient

No surprise there. In fact, the surprise comes when we see that so many are still going to the GP for non-complicated musculoskeletal pains. That’s the real surprise. 

Point 5 Discussion

When you consider that chiropractors hit around 90% for all of those and you see MDs around 64% for the same metrics, well…..that’s not so good, right?

I see A LOT of opportunities here. If you are of the marketing mind, I’m sure you see the same!

This podcast isn’t just for listening to some mindless drivel folks. I am trying to give you stuff that you can use immediately after you listen. If you pay attention to what I’m telling you every week, you can turn around and communicate FACTS to your patients, your staff, and to those in the medical field in your region. 

I’m friends with a neurosurgeon and a vascular surgeon because I’m not freaking crazy. I can communicate research to them in an effective way that they understand. I’ve taught them a ton they didn’t already know. Plus we all like a Cerveza here and there so that works out well for us. 

Research helps you communicate

What I’m saying is that you should be listening to this podcast to learn for sure. But you should also be listening to it with the mindset of, “How am I going to take this information and use it in either my marketing or in my communication with my community?”

Believe me or don’t. I hope you believe me. The information I am bringing to you is the information you should be using. Not the subluxation stuff. Not the philosophy stuff. Literally, straights in our profession are the only people on this Earth that give a damn about that stuff. 

Nobody else knows or cares. Nobody. 

But research, safety, and effectiveness, well…..when you’re talking in those terms, then you are getting somewhere. 

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability. It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Contact

Send us an email at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

http://www.palmer.edu/uploadedFiles/Pages/Alumni/gallup/palmer-gallop-annual-report-2018.pdf

CF 026: Chiropractic Better Than Physical Therapy and Usual Medical Care For Musculoskeletal Issues

 

CF 034: Chiropractic Information To Help You Form Your Practice

 

CF 032: How Evidence-Based Chiropractic Can Help Save The Day

 

CF 048: Do Disc Herniations On An MRI Worsen When Sitting Or Standing (PART TWO)?

CF 048: Do Disc Herniations On An MRI Worsen When Sitting Or Standing (Part TWO)?

Today we’re going to continue our talk from last week on whether or not a disc herniations change as you sit up, stand up, or move around. We went over some pretty good research last week. This week, it’s time for the cherry on the top. 

But first, here’s that bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

 

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have scampered into Episode #48. I use scamper this week because, as my son was playing with his aunt and uncle’s dog named Rowdy down in Dallas last weekend, that was the way he described when the dog would take off after the tennis ball every time. Scamper. Great word that I plan on using more from here on out where appropriate. 

Diplomate of Chiropractic Orthopedists

The DACO this weekend down in Dallas. The class was with James Lehman. Dr. Lehman, in case you do not know, is with the University of Bridgeport Connecticut. His official title from their website is Associate Professor of Clinical Sciences, Health Sciences, College of Chiropractic. 

Dr. Lehman is also one of the main drivers of this DACO program. Through Univ. of Bridgeport Connecticut, he has teamed up with CDI out of Australia and their courses in neuromusculoskeletal online education. It is VERY well done. Very professional and very worthwhile. You can find that at https://cdi.edu.au

We talked a lot about some stuff that I want you to hear straight from him so we’ll do an interview with him very soon but the gist of it all is this: get certified in something other than simply having your doctor of chiropractic degree. 

FQHC

I’ve heard a couple of opinions. I’ve heard the Diplomate programs are worthless now and that people are moving away from them. But, I think that’s coming from people that don’t want to take the time or put in the effort. The real story is most likely that our system, for good or bad, is moving away from private practice and TOWARD integrating through the group offices and through the Federally Qualified Health Centers. 

There are chiropractors being reimbursed in the system up to $300 for a Medicaid visit and around $150 on the lower end. 

I have to thank Dr. Craig Benton once again for bringing this to my attention. Did you guys know that, given the right positioning, you could make that much per appointment from freaking Medicaid?

Here’s the deal though: you have to be a specialist. A Diplomate. So, is it really useless? I say it most certainly is not. 

Whiplash Section

Now the course, the course this weekend was on whiplash. I’ve been through Art Croft’s 4 part Advanced Certification on Whiplash Biomechanics and Traumatology so I can say with a lot of honesty that a good portion of the course was a refresher for me. 

But, I absolutely learned a solid amount of new stuff as well. Such as Axillary compression. Axillary compression was not a condition of the shoulder that was on my radar screen prior to this course. 

That is one simple little example but there was a gob of nuggets for the nugget pouch and as always, I really walked away feeling that I will be better at my job on Monday. But it’s always that way. Even after just a 2-hour online course. It’s phenomenal.

Personal

Continuing the ongoing saga of hiring a front desk staff member in the year 2018. Here’s what all I’m going to say about it. Looks like my wife has found a new full-time job. Lol. Get the picture?

It looks like I may have a cool speaking gig coming up in February. Nothing solid but, if I were to come to your state convention or to some sort of event you are at, what topic along the vein of Chiropractic Forward’s typical content would you like to learn more about? 

If you are a regular listener and familiar with what we have been doing here this last year, I’d really appreciate it if you would take just a minute and email me at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com and give me a little guidance. What topics would you want to see in a presentation?

I’m glad you’re here and hopefully, I didn’t ramble too much before getting to the meat and taters. Here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

On To The Research

Picking up from last week, we want to start in on the changes disc herniations undergo when axial pressure is placed on them. In other words, what happens to disc herniations from the time the MRI is taken laying down to the point where the person sits up. 

I have to preface it all by saying go listen to last week’s episode which is #47, please. It tells you how it is very common in the medical field amongst even radiologists to assume or guess that there is no change in the disc or in the herniation when axial pressure is applied. Research tells us differently. 

This week we want to start with a paper called “Evaluation of intervertebral disc herniation and hypermobile intersegmental instability in symptomatic adult patients undergoing recumbent and upright MRI of the cervical or lumbosacral spines.” It was done by Ferreiro Perez, et. al[1]. and published in the European Journal of Radiology

How they did it

  • 89 Patients studied
  • 45 of them had their low back imaged
  • 44 patients had their necks imaged
  • The images were done in both the lying down position as well as the sitting.

What They Found

  • The overall combined recumbent (lying down) miss rate in cases of pathology was 15%
  • Overall combined recumbent underestimation rate in cases of pathology was 62%
  • Overall combined upright-seated underestimation in cases of pathology was 16%.

Wrap It Up

Upright-seated MRIs were seen to be superior to recumbent MRIs in 52 of the patients studied for conditions of posterior disc herniations and spondylolisthesis. Recumbent MRIs were only superior in 12% of the patients.

Next, this one is titled, “Effect of intervertebral disk degeneration on spinal stenosis during magnetic resonance imaging with axial loading” by Ahn et al[2].

Why They Did It

The authors in this paper were wanting to determine if disc degeneration will increase the severity of spinal stenosis when the spine is loaded with axial pressure. 

How They Did It

They had 51 patients with symptoms of neurogenic intermittent claudication and/or sciatica that had their MRIs loaded as well as non-loaded. 

The foramen involved were all measured for changes in sizes.

Wrap It Up

Here’s what they found, “More accurate diagnosis of stenosis can be achieved using MR imaging with axial loading, especially if grade 2-4 disc degeneration is present.”

AKA:” Seated or loaded MRIs are superior for assessing lumbar stenosis. 

Next, this one is by Willen[3] and it’s called “Dynamic effects on the lumbar spinal canal: axially loaded CT-myelography and MRI in patients with sciatica and/or neurogenic claudication.” It appeared in Spine Journal in 1997. 

They had 50 people with CTs, 34 were imaged with MRI, the imaging was performed laying down as well as axially loaded. 

They closed it up by saying, “Axial loading of the lumbar spine in computed tomographic scanning and magnetic resonance imaging is recommended in patients with sciatica or neurogenic claudication when the dural sac cross-sectional area at any disc location is below 130 mm2 in conventional psoas-relaxed position and when there is a suspected narrowing of the dural sac or the nerve roots, especially in the ventrolateral part of the spinal canal in psoas-relaxed position”

Next Paper

This one is by Kanno, et. al[4]. called “Axial loading during magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis: does it reproduce the positional change of the dural sac detected by upright myelography?” It appeared in Spine Journal in 2012. 

44 patients, with imaging in the supine position and then with axial load added. The dural sack was measured 

“The size of the sack was significantly reduced in the axially loaded imaging and the axial loaded MRI detected severe constriction with a higher sensitivity (96.4%) and specificity (98%) than the conventional MRI.”

Next paper

This one is by Danielson et. al. from 2001 called, “Axially loaded magnetic resonance image of the lumbar spine in asymptomatic individuals.” This paper appeared in Spine Journal in 2001 as well. 

MRIs were performed lying down as well as with axial load on the participants. The axial loading was performed lying down, face up with a compression device built for this study specifically. The diameter of the dural sack was measured to check for the differences. 

The authors said, “A significant decrease in dural cross-sectional area from psoas-relaxed position to axial compression in extension was found in 24 individuals (56%), most frequently at L4-L5, and increasingly with age.”

Pretty cool stuff right there people. 

I want you to go forward this week knowing what you get from listening to this podcast every week. You get things you can absolutely use and implement immediately. Some of you may gain confidence now that you know some research that you maybe didn’t know previously. Some of you may now be able to tell a patient that has a 5mm central posterior herniation that 5mm isn’t telling us the whole story. 

It’s telling us part of the puzzle but that discs respond to positioning and various stresses we put on the discs through our activities. 

Use it or lose it

This can give you some extra guidance in your recommendations when you consider disc herniations change and get worse, stenosis gets worse when the patient sits up or bends forward. 

If you aren’t up on directional preference exercises, McKenzie, and CRISP protocols, it’s time to get there folks. It’s time to get there. The anatomy absolutely responds to movement and positioning. 

Integrating Chiropractors

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability.

It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Contact Us!

I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. We love to stay in touch and want to offer you discount specials when we get our educational products up and rolling. 

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services.

Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

CF 047: Do Disc Herniations On An MRI Worsen When Sitting Or Standing (PART ONE)?

CF 035: Chiropractic & Disc Herniations

Bibliography

1. Ferreiro P, e.a., Evaluation of intervertebral disc herniation and hypermobile intersegmental instability in symptomatic adult patients undergoing recumbent and upright MRI of the cervical or lumbosacral spines. Eur J Radiol, 2007. 62(3): p. 444-8.

2. Ahn TJ, e.a., Effect of intervertebral disk degeneration on spinal stenosis during magnetic resonance imaging with axial loading. Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo), 2009. 49(6): p. 242-7.

3. Willen J, e.a., Dynamic effects on the lumbar spinal canal: axially loaded CT-myelography and MRI in patients with sciatica and/or neurogenic claudication. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 1997. 22(24): p. 2968-76.

4. Kanno H, e.a., Axial loading during magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis: does it reproduce the positional change of the dural sac detected by upright myelography? Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2012. 37(16): p. E985-92.

CF 046: Chiropractic Effectiveness – Chiropractic Integration – Chiropractic Future

Chiropractic Effectiveness – Chiropractic Integration – Chiropractic Future

Today we’re going to talk about what I think is some good news that bodes very well for the chiropractic future, for chiropractic integration, chiropractic effectiveness, and playing well with others. We’ll discuss a paper on non-pharma ways of treating pain and then we’ll discuss an article showing how roadblocks are set up to keep Americans from following those recommendations.

Stick with us as we shake it all out, but first, here’s that bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

Welcome to the podcast today, I am still pretty new to the podcast game so, in case you don’t know me just yet,…I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.

You have gallivanted into Episode #46 and we are so glad you did.

DACO Program

Let’s talk a bit about the DACO program, I have gone through 30 hours live and have taken 12 hours online so far. That makes 42 of the 300 but hey, who’s counting right? The last one I took had to do with Cervical pain and neural tension. I’m man enough to admit that, while I have an A in the class, I missed a question on this one and here’s what I’m going to say…..STOP. Stop asking trick questions dammit.

Honestly, you can know the material cold but the way they ask some of the questions, there’s no telling what the hell the answer is. “Which statement makes the most clinical sound?” Fine…no problem. But, as you read through them, there is maybe one answer that is very thorough while the others are not technically incorrect but aren’t quite as comprehensive as the one answer. Then, yes…..the feared…..ALL OF THE ABOVE.

Uh huh….just ask the damn question and be fair about it. That’s all I’m saying. On one hand, one answer is most definitely more clinically sound than the others. On the other hand, all of them have some correct aspects. So, you’re bound to miss some here or there and, with only 5 questions, you miss one, you make an 80. An 80 is hard for me to swallow friends.

So….cut it out, people. Be fair in your questioning. Thank you very much

The material though, my goodness. I can’t even begin to tell you all how wonderful the material is. Of course, I like some of the classes more than others. The one on pain was not necessarily my favorite but I muddled through it and still know a ton more about pain than I did prior to. Pain is a difficult topic but they did an excellent job of lining it out for us.

Every class makes a difference. Without a doubt. Let me know if you need some guidance on getting started on your DACO. Which was the main thing for me….just getting started in the first place. It’s a bit confusing but once you get enrolled and get that first class under your belt, you’re good to go. Just email me at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com

Sign up for our Chiropractic Forward Newsletter

If you haven’t yet, please go sign up for our Chiropractic Forward newsletter by going to chiropractic forward.com and it’ll pop up right there. You can’t miss it. It almost punches you right in the face. Help us keep pass along important stuff here by getting on that newsletter. Never any more than once per week. Promise.

Evidently, you and your colleagues are catching onto this here podcast. We appreciate it and we appreciate your continuing sharing it with you people. That’s the only way to grow.

Front Desk Woes

So far, we still have the front desk staff in place. So that’s been amazing to not be obsessing about. It is really hard to find the right person with the right qualities to fill that spot. I’m not spouting fake numbers when I tell you that we see an average of about 60 new patients per month by myself.

No associate. I had a colleague recently tell me they don’t think they could do that by their self. I have to admit, I didn’t realize it was an impressive amount. Lol. I was glad to hear it though. Here’s my deal though, I don’t hold onto them. I see them, get them better, and will have them again in a year or so when they re-injure something.

I have about 40 or so visits booked per day and that’s pretty manageable when you have great staff. I still work from 8-1 on Fridays too. The majority of my time is spent on new patients trying to figure them out. After we have a direction with a patient, however, we have a team of people that really help take the workload off of me other than the actual adjusting.

And, in case anyone is wondering out there, I adjust manually, Diversified with some drops here and there. Very little activator. Some muscle work when appropriate but there’s not a lot of fluff in a visit once we are rocking and rolling with a case.

I tell them that I can really drag this visit out and make it last a lot longer than it takes if they want me to but most are ready to get in and out and back to work. And that works well for us too.

Getting back on track

Anyway, back to the original point: it’s hard to find someone that is not intimidated by the insurance demands, new patients, existing patients, etc…but excited about chiropractic effectiveness….looking them in the eyes all day every day all day.

Plus, a third of the building is massage, day spa services so, the right person is key. They get intimidated and leave. Lol. I suppose it’s a good problem to have. But, so far so good with the new one!

As I’ve said before, I will certainly keep you updated.

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

Let’s get into the papers

Let’s kick off the discussion today with one from McGregor, et. al. 2014 called “Differentiating intraprofessional attitudes toward paradigms in health care delivery among chiropractic factions: results from a randomly sampled survey.” It was published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine[1].

In the background section of the abstract, the authors’ discuss how healthcare has increased in complexity and there has developed a need for interprofessional collaboration. Amen, brothers and sisters.

It goes on to talk about how different factions within the chiropractic profession are contrary to each other and how one faction holding unorthodox practice beliefs and behaviors may compromise interprofessional relations going forward.

We can have all of the research on our side but when you have one faction of the profession spouting chiropractic effectiveness for everything under the sun, well, the credibility of the profession as a whole really suffers.

The purpose of this paper was, “to quantify the professional stratification among Canadian chiropractic practitioners and evaluate the practice perceptions of those factions.”

How do you go about figuring this stuff out? Luckily, there are far more intelligent people out there in the world. They took a stratified random sample of 740 Canadian chiropractors and surveyed them in an attempt to determine faction membership and how professional stratification could be related to views that could be considered unorthodox to current evidence-based care and guides.

What they found

Out of 740 questionnaires, 503 came back.

Less than 18.8% of the chiropractors were in the faction considered to be unorthodox in the perceptions of the conditions they treat.

They also state that prediction models suggest that unorthodox perceptions of health practice related to treatment choices, x-ray use, and vaccinations were strongly associated with unorthodox group membership.

The conclusions reached here were as quoted, “Chiropractors holding unorthodox views may be identified based on response to specific beliefs that appear to align with unorthodox health practices.”

Despite continued concerns by mainstream medicine, only a minority of the profession has retained a perspective in contrast to current scientific paradigms. Understanding the profession’s factions is important to the anticipation of care delivery when considering interprofessional referral.”

Basically, what they’re saying is that, in Canada at least, there are 20% of you chiropractors walking around saying your nerve doctors, that you fix everything under the sun, and you’re releasing the innate and turning on the power. This isn’t chiropractic effectiveness. This is belief. Not research-based findings.

That 20 % is REALLY putting 80% of us that have busted our butts and learned the latest science and research….you’re putting us at risk of staying right where we’ve always been rather than expanding, integrating, and being the experts in what we do.

We are masters at what we do but there are 20% out there keeping anyone that matters from taking the rest of us seriously. When we are talking about legitimate chiropractic effectiveness, that 20% has taken away our credibility.

Parento’s principle proves to be a real thing once again. 20% of chiropractors do all of the work in discrediting the other 80% of the profession.

Next paper

Let’s go to the next paper before I lose my mind.

This one is called Evidence-Based Nonpharmacologic Strategies for Comprehensive Pain Care[2]. It was published in June of 2018 in Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing and was written by Heather Tick MD along with a team of other medical doctor/PhDs.

Dr. Tick is a specialist in pain management in Seattle Washington. She even has her own website and blog. All that good stuff. You can check it out at heathertickmd.com if you are so inclined.

A little more about her: She co-founded and directed one of the first inter-disciplinary pain centers in Toronto from 1991 – 2008 and has been involved in research with the University of Waterloo at the Department of Kinesiology, the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC), the University of Washington, and the University of Arizona.

She served as the Director of the Integrative Pain Clinic at the University of Arizona in the Department of Family and Community Medicine until Dec 2011, when the University of Arizona Health Plan recruited her to start the integrative medicine pain clinic for Medicaid patients.

Dr. Tick currently serves at the forefront of research and teaching as a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Washington in the departments of Family Medicine and Anesthesia & Pain Medicine and is also the first holder of the prestigious Gunn-Locke Endowed Professorship of Integrative Pain Medicine at the University of Washington.

In this paper, Dr. Tick starts by saying “Medical pain management is in crisis; from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addiction, diversion and overdose deaths.”

I like that opening quote. I like it a lot, folks. She’s saying that the medical way of managing pain isn’t working and throwing more pills at it is a downward spiral. And I agree as I’m sure you do as well.

She goes on saying, “There is pressure for pain medicine to shift away from reliance on opioids, ineffective procedures and surgeries toward comprehensive pain management that includes evidence-based nonpharmacologic options.

“Transforming the system of pain care to a responsive comprehensive model necessitates that options for treatment and collaborative care must be evidence-based and include effective nonpharmacologic strategies that have the advantage of reduced risks of adverse events and addiction liability.”

Conclusion

The evidence demands a call to action to increase awareness of effective nonpharmacologic treatments for pain, to train healthcare practitioners and administrators in the evidence base of effective nonpharmacologic practice, to advocate for policy initiatives that remedy system and reimbursement barriers to evidence-informed comprehensive pain care, and to promote ongoing research and dissemination of the role of effective nonpharmacologic treatments in pain, focused on the short- and long-term therapeutic and economic impact of comprehensive care practices.

Here’s what I hate to do: I hate quoting an abstract word for word. It’s usually dry and well….boring. But, what she says here is so spot-on, quoting it was the best way to get it across in an equal manner. Meaning that I couldn’t say it better myself. Chiropractic effectiveness is becoming undeniable at this point.

She nails it:

  1. It’s not working
  2. We need non-pharma options that are backed by evidence
  3. There are barriers set up to prevent non-pharma options from being utilized
  4. There is ignorance in regards to non-pharma options and that needs to be addressed through education
  5. Continued research is needed

Further down into the paper, the authors mention in one spot that chiropractic care is 60-70% less likely to be reimbursed. Is that accurate? We are typically covered by most insurance plans no?

When they are saying that there are barriers set up to prevent complementary options, this may fit her rhetoric or point but I just haven’t experienced it being that much less likely to have coverage.

They cite a paper by James Whedon, Et. al. where they found, for New Hampshire[3], there was 60%-70% less reimbursement. I wonder if that is consistent throughout the US or if it’s isolated to New Hampshire?

That’s a great question and if one of you out there in podcast listening land knows the answer, please email me at dr.williams@chiropracticforward.com and fill me in. I’m curious and I’m pretty sure the rest of us out there are too.

Under their Evidence-Based Non-pharm Therapies for Acute Pain, they point out that non-pharma therapists have shown effective in acute pain with opioid paring in the hospital setting as a result of their use and the therapies mentioned in the paper are acupuncture, chiropractic, osteopathic manipulative therapy, massage, physical therapy, relaxation, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

The authors also site spinal manipulative therapy as being effective for chronic pain including migraines, cervicogenic headache, neck pain, low back, hip pain, patellofemoral syndrome, and on and on. Of course, we chiropractors know this stuff but it’s great to see it in black and white and as part of a paper written exclusively by MDs and PhDs.

This is a long paper with a lot of excellent information. I highly encourage your checking it out. Just go to our show notes for links and citations.

Wrap it up

A great takeaway from this paper is this quote, “In general, the costs of evidence-based nonpharmacologic options are nominal compared to medical costs of treating chronic pain with risk mitigation and greater potential for engaging patients in ongoing self-care.”

This is exactly why we are discussing chiropractic effectiveness at length these days. It is paramount for the future of our patients as well as for the the chiropractic future for people to get this message.

Last Paper

The last paper I want to talk about is by our very own Dr. Christine Goertz, DC, Ph.D. with Steven George, PT, Ph.D. as her side-kick and is published in JAMA. It’s called “Insurer Coverage of Nonpharmacological Treatments for Low Back Pain—Time for a Change[4]” and published on October 5 of this year so, just this month. Brand new.

Dr. Goertz begins by relating low back pain with the obvious opioid crisis and goes into last year’s recommendation that you’ve heard here a million times.

The recommendations from the American College of Physicians for low back pain which recommended spinal manipulative therapy as a first-line therapy for chronic and acute low back pain.

We will talk about it in upcoming episodes but Dr. Goertz also mentions the new Gallup-Palmer Poll where they found that 78% of US adults prefer to use non-pharma options for back and neck pain.

In the article, she cites a paper by Heyward, et. al[5].  called “Coverage of Nonpharmacologic treatment for low back pain among US public and private insurers” that found coverage of some therapies (like chiropractic) was available in most health plans but that there are significant barriers to patient access identified.

Barriers such as visit limits, prior authorization requirements, and high out-of-pocket expenses. And that payment policies targeted toward coordination of pharmacological and nonpharmacological care were virtually nonexistent.

She says pretty clearly the following: In regards to most health plans surveyed, they did not have policies in place that:

  1. emphasize the use of nonpharmacological treatments at the forefront of the patient experience
  2. provide meaningful levels of coverage for care professionals who focus on guideline-adherent nondrug therapies like spinal manipulation, exercise, massage, acupuncture, and cognitive behavioral therapy
  3. us financial incentives that favor the use of nonpharmacological options over commonly prescribed pharmaceuticals, including opioids

Wrap it up

She also calls out healthcare executives quite effectively I thought by saying, “Relative to stigma, Heyward et al found that health care executives did not believe expanded coverage of nonpharmacological treatments is supported by the existing literature.

As outlined in the ACP guideline referenced earlier, in many cases nonpharmacological treatments offer equal benefit or even improved benefit, with lower risk, than commonly used pharmaceutical options.”

And by suggesting that future coverage policies should be based on unbiased reviews of the evidence appropriately balancing risk with benefit rather than prior dogma or biases.

Lastly, Dr. Goertz discusses cost-effectiveness and the need for future payment policies to decrease patient out-of-pocket expenses to strongly encourage earlier us of evidence-based non-harms options.

The Heyward paper demonstrated how trips to PTs or DCs are usually 6-12 visits with an out-of-pocket of $150-$720 or more. She then showed how Lin et. al. showed the median cost of a 30-day  supply of preferred generic opioid by commercial insurers is $10.

How does that add up for the Joe Blow citizen on the street?

It doesn’t.

I love how they sum it up by saying, “Restricting access to opioids without addressing the underlying problem of chronic care management for low back pain is unlikely to positively affect the opioid crisis. Well-conceived guidelines that encourage the use of evidence-based, nonpharmacological treatment options exist and must be enabled by changes in public health policies that better guide care delivery and reimbursement.”

Boom, Snap, kapow, Shazam…

Honestly, where would we be without Dr. Goertz? We’d still be moving the direction we’re moving in because of the opioid issue but she has done some amazing work that is putting us on the fast track where we hope to go rather than on the snail’s pace.

This week, I want you to go forward understanding that It’s happening folks. we are now able to cite papers in JAMA that are pro-chiropractic. Pro-complementary health care. Anti-pharma. This is big stuff. We are in the right place at the right time. And, it was in part, the failure of many in the medical kingdom that put us here. Integrating Chiropractors

The message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability.

It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool.

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

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TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Insurer Coverage of Nonpharmacological Treatments for Low Back Pain—Time for a Change | Complementary and Alternative Medicine | JAMA Network Open | JAMA Network

Evidence-Based Nonpharmacologic Strategies for Comprehensive Pain Care – Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28304182?dopt=Abstract

Differentiating intraprofessional attitudes toward paradigms in health care delivery among chiropractic factions: results from a randomly sampled survey | BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Full Text

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2705853

Bibliography

1. McGregor M, Differentiating intraprofessional attitudes toward paradigms in health care delivery among chiropractic factions: results from a randomly sampled survey. BMC Comp Altern Med, 2014. 14(51).

2. Tick H, Evidence-Based Nonpharmacologic Strategies for Comprehensive Pain Care. Explore J Science Healing, 2018. 14(3): p. 177-211.

3. Whedon JM, e.a., Insurance Reimbursement for Complementary Healthcare Services. J Altern Complement Med, 2017. 23(4): p. 264-267.

4. C, G., Insurer Coverage of Nonpharmacological Treatments for Low Back Pain—Time for a Chang. JAMA, 2018. 1(6).

5. Heyward J, Coverage of Nonpharmacologic Treatments for Low Back Pain Among US Public and Private Insurers. JAMA, 2018. 1(6).

CF 020: Chiropractic Evolution or Extinction?

CF 027: WANTED – Safe, Nonpharmacological Means Of Treating Spinal Pain

CF 030: Integrating Chiropractors – What’s It Going To Take?

 

 

 

CF 043: Stroke Caused By Chiropractor

CF 043: Stroke Caused By Chiropractor

Today we’re going to talk about Stroke caused by chiropractor and we’re to show you once again what a pile of hooey the idea is and we’ll even talk a bit about where it came from.Integrating Chiropractors

Stick with us but first, we’re going wade through this here bumper music. 

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have bee-bopped into Episode #43 and we are so glad to have you. I’ve noticed that podcasts are going into Seasons….Shows you how much I pay attention to stuff outside of what I’m doing. I’m ashamed. I should do Seasons. Here’s the deal though. I enjoy it so much. I actually WANT to put one out every week. It’s not work when you’re having fun right?

It can be a little stressful creating content and talking points but hey, we get through it and have a lot of fun in the process. 

Growth

What a great month this has been in regards to listens and downloads. You’ve heard me say it before but it’s fun to watch. Because I’m a numbers nerd and who the heck doesn’t like to see the growth of a brainchild?

Speaking of growth, I’ve started work on something that I hope you’ll love. I’ll hope you’ll think about using for your own offices, and I think may be pretty cool. I’ll fill you in more and more as we go along but just know, I’m working on something and you should get yourself on our email list at www.chiropracticforward.com so I can tell you about it and maybe pass along discounts, stuff like that. Email list. Do it. 

A little personal…

How has your week been? Mine….well….I have to continue the saga of hiring a new front desk person. Hell people. Actual hell. The first one just didn’t show up. The second one we hired lasted three days. Three freaking days, folks. 

But, we think we have a winner in place now. You know I’m going to keep you all updated on this deal. This by itself has been enough for its own reality show. I’ve never seen anything like it. The workforce right now just doesn’t seem to want to work. At least that’s my experience lately. 

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

Let’s get to the research papers

First thing’s first. I have covered this stroke caused by chiropractor topic in depth. As in….very in-depth. In Episodes 13, 14, and 15. If you do nothing else this week as far as educating yourself, make sure you go listen to those three episodes in stroke caused by chiropractor or read it on our blog at http://www.chiropracticforward.com all of which are linked here in the show notes. 

Podcast Episodes:

Blog: https://www.chiropracticforward.com/blog-post/debunked-the-odd-myth-that-chiropractors-cause-strokes-revisited/

YouTube Video: https://youtu.be/tRXpG_Ie0Rs

Why go over stroke again?

So, why go over stroke caused by chiropractor again? Well, one reason is that it’s been a while since we touched on the topic. Another being that I heard a prominent speaker just this year talking about chiropractors causing strokes and implying that it happens fairly often. That’s a pro-chiropractic speaker, by the way, acting as if chiropractors are the sole reason for a stroke on a regular basis. 

I don’t think that it is necessarily the way the discussion was meant but it could definitely have been interpreted in that manner if those listening didn’t have the information from our Debunked series. 

The other reason I wanted to cover stroke caused by chiropractor again is that is the main thing in regards to safety that the medical kingdom tries to hold over us. Or that they’ve been told about us. And, instead of doing their work on this, they just believe it. 

New habits take 20 days to cement. We need new habits in the medical realm so I’m doing my part by taking away one of the main things they have against us. One may argue that the philosophy and subluxation model is another thing they hold against us but, all I can do about that is continue to disseminate evidence-based information and keep plugging. We’ll see where that part of it goes in the future. 

Common sense talk

For now, though, it’s about stroke caused by chiropractor this week here on the Chiropractic Forward podcast. Now, let’s compare and contrast shall we?

Did you know that the RAND Institute estimates a chiropractic adjustment is the sole cause of a vertebral artery dissection at the rate of only about 1 in 1 million or more adjustments? And did you know that your chances of winning an Oscar stand at about 1 in 11,500? Your chances of being hit by lightning are 1 in 176,426? 

How about this: NSAIDS like ibuprofen and acetaminophen cause around 16,000 deaths per year and send 100,000 people to the ER in America….EVERY YEAR.

Let’s let all that sink in. I say all of that just to put things into context and to make the point that the medical kingdom needs to quit making such a big damn deal out of trained and licensed chiropractors adjusting necks. 

We’re starting with this paper 2015 by Kosloff and friends titled, “Chiropractic care and the risk of vertebrobasilar stroke: results of a case-control study in U.S. commercial and Medicare Advantage populations[1].” It was published in Chiropractic & Manual Therapies. 

Why They Did It

This is obvious. We’re looking at the real chances of chiropractic adjustments being the culprit for strokes. 

What They Found

There were 1,829 vertebral basilar artery stroke cases

Findings showed no significant association between chiropractic visits and VBA stroke

The Authors’ Conclusion

“We found no significant association between exposure to chiropractic care and the risk of VBA stroke. We conclude that manipulation is an unlikely cause of VBA stroke. The positive association between PCP visits and VBA stroke is most likely due to patient decisions to seek care for the symptoms (headache and neck pain) of arterial dissection. We further conclude that using chiropractic visits as a measure of exposure to manipulation may result in unreliable estimates of the strength of association with the occurrence of VBA stroke.”

Research Paper #2

Just like a rolling stone we are moving on and gathering no grass…..

This next paper is from Church, et. al. and is called, “Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Chiropractic Care and Cervical Artery Dissection: No Evidence for Causation[2].” It was published in Cureus in February of 2016. 

Just to review the research hierarchy for those unaware, systematic reviews and meta-analysis papers are at the tippy top of the food chain just above randomized controlled trials. It’s like people in the animal kingdom. We’re the top predators ya know. 

Anyway, the point is: this is reliable information folks. 

We already know why they did it so let’s skip to what they concluded. “ There is no convincing evidence to support a causal link between chiropractic manipulation and CAD. Belief in a causal link may have significant negative consequences such as numerous episodes of litigation.”

Uhhuh….numerous episodes of litigation based on belief and NOT based on fact or research. Believing stroke caused by chiropractor is unfortunate.

Now we come to the guy that helped put the matter to rest once and for all. If you are unaware of John David Cassidy, let me introduce you. He is a professor at the University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health and is a Ph.D.

Research Paper #3

Let’s start with his newer one concerning this topic. It’s called “Risk of Carotid Stroke after Chiropractic Care: A Population-Based Case-Crossover Study[3].” It was published in the Journal of Stroke & Cerebrovascular Diseases in 2017. Newer stuff from JD Cassidy, folks. 

As you’ll see, this paper deals with CAROTID artery and stroke specifically whereas the next and last paper deals with the VERTEBRAL artery and stroke. 

  • The why is obvious once again so, what did they find?
  • They compared 15,523 cases to 62,092 control periods using exposure windows of 1, 3, 7, and 14 days prior to the stroke. 
  • There was no significant difference between chiropractic and PCP risk estimates. 
  • They found no association between chiropractic visits and stroke in those 45 years of age or older. 

The Conclusion

“We found no excess risk of carotid artery stroke after chiropractic care. Associations between chiropractic and PCP visits and stroke were similar and likely due to patients with early dissection-related symptoms seeking care prior to developing their strokes.”

Research Paper #4

You’re about to notice a trend here. Next paper is by Cassidy et. al. as well and is called, “Risk of Vertebrobasilar Stroke and Chiropractic Care: Results of a Population-Based Case-Control and Case-Crossover Study[4].” This is the Daddy of papers proving that chiropractic adjustments are not the sole cause of strokes. 

Again, everyone knows why the research was done so let’s get to the meat and taters. 

  • It was done over a nine-year period from April 1993 to March of 2002. 
  • There were 818 vertebrobasilar artery strokes hospitalized in a population of more than 100 million person-years. 
  • There was no increased association between chiropractic visits and VBA stroke in those older than 45 years. 

The Conclusion and nail in the coffin

“VBA stroke is a very rare event in the population. The increased risks of VBA stroke associated with chiropractic and PCP visits is likely due to patients with headache and neck pain from VBA dissection seeking care before their stroke. We found no evidence of excess risk of VBA stroke associated chiropractic care compared to primary care.”

It’s like the action hero cartoons “Shazam” “Pow” “Bang” “Smack!”

Again, believing stroke caused by chiropractor unfortunate.

Wrap It Up

I’ve said it a thousand times. “If we were wrong, we’d have been wiped out years ago.” Lord knows every force of the medical kingdom focused on our demise for generations and that goes from the national and state associations all the way into the national and state legislatures. 

How do you fight against that amount of money and power and survive if you’re not inherently right in what you’re doing?

We can argue amongst ourselves till the cows come home about how to do our jobs but, in the end, we help our patients, we get them better when nobody else can, and….well…we’re right. 

So, the haters in the medical field can take a long walk off a short pier and stick it in their ears. I’m not always professional and that’s OK. I’ve always felt being strictly professional all of the time is more than just a little bit boring. We need more spice, personality, and a lot more laughter in life don’t we? 

Integrating Chiropractors

Affirmation

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability. It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Contact us

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Research Paper Links:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26085925

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/18204390/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27014532

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/27884458/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2271108/

Bibliography

1. Kosloff T, e.a., Chiropractic care and the risk of vertebrobasilar stroke: results of a case–control study in U.S. commercial and Medicare Advantage populations. Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, 2015. 23(19).

2. Church E, e.a., Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Chiropractic Care and Cervical Artery Dissection: No Evidence for Causation. Cureus, 2016. 8(2): p. e498.

3. Cassidy, e.a., Risk of Carotid Stroke after Chiropractic Care: A Population-Based Case-Crossover Study. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis, 2017. 26(4): p. 842-850.

4. Cassidy, e.a., Risk of Vertebrobasilar Stroke and Chiropractic Car. Spine, 2008. 33(4S): p. S176-S183.

CF 032: How Evidence-Based Chiropractic Can Help Save The Day

CF 029: w/ Dr. Devin Pettiet – Is Chiropractic Integration Healthy For The Profession?

CF 028: Will Chiropractic First Finally Take Its Place?

 

 

CF 042: w/ Dr. Tyce Hergert – Chiropractic Maintenance Care / Chiropractic Preventative Care

CF 042: w/ Dr. Tyce Hergert – Chiropractic Maintenance Care / Chiropractic Preventative Care

Tyce hergert chiropractor southlake

Integrating Chiropractors

Today we have a special return appearance from a friend of the show and we’re going to talk about chiropractic maintenance care also known as chiropractic preventative care. Chiropractors have recommended a regular schedule to their patients for generations but it was mostly as a result of experience and intuition. But what about research on the matter? We’ll get to it.

But first, here’s that bumper music

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

Be sure you have signed up for our newsletter slash email. You can do that at chiropracticforward.com and it lets us keep you updated on new episodes and new evidence-based products when they come out. Yes, eventually there will be some pretty cool things available through us. We won’t email any more than once per week and the value outweighs the risk. Kind of like in cervical manipulation. So just go get that done while we’re thinking about it. 

You have confidently strutted right into Episode #42 and we are so glad you did. 

I would really like to just turn this mic on and automatically be the #1 chiropractic podcast in the world but that’s not the real world, right? But I have to say that we continue to grow. I’m impatient and it’s never quite fast enough but we are continually growing and that’s always exciting. When you see the growth chart consistently going up and to the right, then hell yeah. Ka-bam shazam. 

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

My Week

But first, my week has been nuts. When was the last time you tried to hire someone? It’s absolutely stupid these days. Honestly, I posted a job on indeed.com. I got literally 175 resumes, scheduled 15 interviews, only 7 showed up for the interview, and we have one really good prospect. 

This is the second round by the way. We tried to hire for the front desk position a few weeks ago and went through 120 resumes. We actually hired a girl but then her dad got sick and after thinking it over, decided we weren’t a good fit. Lol. Can you imagine? 

I don’t know if you can tell from this podcast or not but….I’m generally a pretty darn good guy and really care about my staff and care about people and care about making connections with others. 

I don’t yell, I don’t fuss a lot. Even when they’re wrong. That’s just not my style. I don’t think I stink or anything having to do with body functions so, I can’t figure it out other than people have just changed. Or has it always been hard to find good help? All I know is that I’m having a hell of a time finding the right front desk personnel and it’s making me more than a little crazy. 

Welcome Dr. Tyce Hergert from Southlake, TX

Now that we have all of that out of the way, I want to welcome our guest today. You could say we sort of know each other. In fact, we grew up in the same neighborhood from elementary school all the way through high school. Even though I was a couple years older, we definitely knew each other. He lived right next door to my best friend and we played football in his front yard pretty often. 

We were at the University of North Texas at the same time living in Denton, TX and then we were down at Parker College of Chiropractic at the same time as well. If that weren’t enough, we have both served in statewide leadership positions for the Texas Chiropractic Association. In fact, Tyce is part of the reason I got involved in the first place. 

He took it a step further than me though. Dr. Hergert actually served as the President of the TCA two terms ago and helped steer the profession to a historic 4 chiro-friendly bills passed in the state legislature that year. This is important because the bills that were passed in our favor prior to that would be basically zero, none, nada, goose-egg, zilch. 

About an Integrated Practice

Dr. Hergert also runs an integrated practice down in Southlake, TX so he’s an excellent resource for our kind of podcast. 

Some people kind of think he’s a big deal and there’s a good argument to be made for that but I’m not going to be the one making it because I’ve known him way too long. 

Not only is he an ex-Pres for the TCA, but he also has the bragging rights of being a guest on 2 of our top five most popular episodes of all times here at the Chiropractic Forward Podcast. Those are episodes 6 and 11 with 11 actually being our most listened to episode of all time so congrats to Dr. Hergert on that. 

If you enjoy his guest appearance on this episode, although I’d be a bit flabbergasted as to why you enjoyed it….you can always get more of Tyce on those. Again, I’m not sure why you’d ever want to do that. Lol. 

Welcome to the show Dr. Hergert. Thank you for taking the time to join us. 

Tell us a little bit about Southlake, TX for the ones unfamiliar with the Dallas/Ft. Worth area. 

Tell us a little bit about running an integrated practice. What’s it like? Have you become more of an owner/administrator or are your elbow deep in treatment and the physical aspects of seeing patients all day every day still?

Getting To The Research

This first paper….I alluded to back in episode #36 but very briefly. We covered a little more in depth back in Episode #19 as well which posted back in April of this year. I think in light of a brand new paper that just came out, it’s worth covering this one again if you do not mind. It’s all about chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment.

It’s called “Does maintained spinal manipulation therapy for chronic nonspecific low back pain result in better long-term outcome?” and was published in the prestigious Spine journal[1]. 

For the purpose of this study, keep in mind that SMT stands for spinal manipulation therapy. Also of special note is that chiropractors perform over 90% of SMTs in America so I commonly interchange SMT or spinal manipulation therapy with the term “Chiropractic Adjustment.”

Why They Did It

The authors of this paper wanted to check how effective spinal manipulation, also known as chiropractic adjustments, would be for chronic nonspecific low back pain and if chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment adjustments were effective over the long-term in regards to pain levels and disability levels after the initial phase of treatment ended.

How They Did It

  • 60 patients having chronic low back pain of at least six months duration
  • Randomized into three different groups:
  • They included 12 treatments of fake treatment for one month
  • One group had 12 treatments of chiropractic adjustments for a month only
  • They also had a group with 12 treatments for a month with maintenance adjustments added every 2 weeks for the following 9 months.
  • Outcome assessments measured for pain and disability, generic health status, and back-specific patient satisfaction at the beginning of treatment

What They Found

  • Patients in groups 2 and 3 had a significant reduction in pain and disability scores.
  • ONLY group 3, the group that had chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment adjustments added, had more reduction in pain and disability scores at the ten-month time interval.
  • The groups not having chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment adjustments, pain and disability scores returned close to the levels experienced prior to treatment.

Wrap It Up

The authors’ conclusion is quoted as saying, “SMT is effective for the treatment of chronic nonspecific LBP. To obtain long-term benefit, this study suggests maintenance SM after the initial intensive manipulative therapy.”

Dr. Hergert, what do you have to say on this one? I’m not sure what there is to say except, “Told you so!”

What do you typically recommend to your patients as far as chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment care goes?

Paper #2:

Actually, this one is a webpage linked in the show notes for you at ChiropracticForward.com in episode #42. 

http://www.chiro.org/research/ABSTRACTS/Documentation_Supporting_Maintenance_Care.shtml

This article was compiled by Dr. Anthony Rosner, Ph.D and called Documentation Supporting Maintenance Care[2]. 

The article starts by saying that the RAND Corporation studied a subpopulation of patients who were under chiropractic care compared to those who were NOT and found that the individuals under continuing chiropractic care were:

  • Less likely to be in a nursing home
  • Were less likely to have been in the hospital the previous 23 years
  • They were more likely to report better health status
  • Most were more likely to exercise vigorously

Although it is impossible to clearly establish causality, it is clear that continuing chiropractic care is among the attributes of the cohort of patients experiencing substantially fewer costly healthcare interventions[3]. 

The next paper on chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment is by Dr. Rosner and talks about was a review of a larger cohort of elderly patients under chiropractic care and those not under chiropractic care. Basically, comparing monies spent on hospitals, doctor visits, and nursing homes[4] They found the following: Those under chiropractic care saved almost three times the money those NOT under chiropractic care spent for healthcare. 

  • $3,105 vs. $10,041

How’s it looking so far, Tyce?

Tyce, you’re going to like this one. Chances are, you’re probably going to want to tell people all about this one. 

Let’s get to the newer paper I mentioned before. It’s called The Nordic Maintenance Career program: Effectiveness of chiropractic maintenance care versus symptom-guided treatment for recurrent and persistent low back pain – pragmatic randomized controlled trial and it was compiled by Andreas Eklund, et. al[5]. 

Why They Did It

The authors wanted to explore chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment in the chiropractic profession. What is the effectiveness for prevention of pain in patients with recurrent or persistent non-specific low back pain?

How They Did It

  • 328 patients
  • Pragmatic, investigator-blinded. Pragmatic. What does that mean exactly? According to Califf and Sugarman 2015, It means it is “Designed for the primary purpose of informing decision-makers regarding the comparative balance of benefits, burdens and risks of a biomedical or behavioral health intervention at the individual or population level” Meaning they are attempting to run a trial to inform decision-makers of responsible guidelines going forward. That’s it for the dummies like me in the room. 
  • Two arm randomized controlled trial
  • Included patients 18-65 w/ non-specific low back pain
  • The patients all experienced an early favorable result with chiropractic care. 
  • After an initial course of treatment ended, the patients were randomized into either a maintenance care group or a control group. 
  • The control group still received chiropractic care but on a symptom-related basis. 
  • The main outcome measured was the number of days with bothersome low back pain during a 1 year period. 
  • The info was collected weekly through text messaging. 

What They Found

  • Maintenance care showed a reduction in the number of days per week having low back pain
  • During the year-long study, the chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment group showed 12.8 fewer days. 
  • The chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment received 1.7 more treatments than the symptom-related group. 

Wrap It Up

The authors wrap it up by saying, “Maintenance care was more effective than symptom-guided treatment in reducing the total number of days over 52 weeks with bothersome non-specific LBP but it resulted in a higher number of treatments. For selected patients with recurrent or persistent non-specific LBP who respond well to an initial course of chiropractic care, MC should be considered an option for tertiary prevention.”

Basically, both groups still underwent chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment. It’s like we tell people, stay on a schedule and you’ll do well. Wait until you hurt and the chances are good that you’ll spend the same amount getting over that complaint anyway. 

This study showed that exactly except, over the course of just one year, the maintenance chiropractic care (preventative chiropractic care) people had 1.7 more visits but suffered pain almost 13 days less. 

Bring it home

Are two appointments extra worth almost 2 weeks less of having pain in a year’s time? I say hell yes. 

Dr. Hergert…what say you?

Lay some sage-like wisdom on us here and bring it all home for us won’t you please?

This week, I want you to go forward with the knowledge that, when you write “patient recommended preventative chiropractic care schedule going forward” you can do so confidently knowing your are right and there is research showing it. 

You don’t have to recommend chiropractic maintenance and chiropractic preventative treatment simply because you heard to do that at school or because your old boss always did it. 

You can make those recommendations because it’s best for your patients. 

Dr. Hergert, do you have anything to add, this is probably your last time on the podcast after all. 

Thank you so much for hanging out with us today, I was kidding of course. We will make time and do it again down the road. 

Integrating Chiropractors

Affirmation

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability. It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. Senna MK, Does maintained spinal manipulation therapy for chronic nonspecific low back pain result in better long-term outcome? Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2011. Aug 15; 36(18): p. 1427-37.

2. Rosner A. Documentation Supporting Maintenance Care. Chiro.org 2016; Available from: http://www.chiro.org/research/ABSTRACTS/Documentation_Supporting_Maintenance_Care.shtml.

3. Coulter ID, Chiropractic Patients in a Comprehensive Home-Based Geriatric Assessment, Follow-up and Health Promotion Program. Topic in Clinical Chiropractic, 1996. 3(2): p. 46-55.

4. Rupert R, Maintenance Care: Health Promotion Services Administered to US Chiropractic Patients Aged 65 and Older, Part II. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2000. 23(1): p. 10-19.

5. Eklund A, The Nordic Maintenance Care program: Effectiveness of chiropractic maintenance care versus symptom-guided treatment for recurrent and persistent low back pain—A pragmatic randomized controlled trial. PLoS One, 2018. 13(9).

CF 040: w/ Dr. Brandon Steele: Chiropractic Standardization & The Future of Chiropractic

 

CF 038: w/ Dr. Jerry Kennedy – Chiropractic Marketing Done Right

CF 029: w/ Dr. Devin Pettiet – Is Chiropractic Integration Healthy For The Profession?

CF 005: Valuable & Reliable Expert Advice On Clinical Guides For Your Practice

 

CF 041: w/ Dr. William Lawson – Research For Neck Pain

Research for neck pain

Integrating Chiropractors

Today we’re going to talking with Dr. William Lawson from Austin, TX about research for neck pain and what research is available for it. While low back gets all of the attention in the research, neck pain has taken a back seat but not today!

But first, here’s that bumper music

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast because I’m the only one that’ll do it.  

Have you taken the time to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter? It’s important because doing that makes it easier to let you know when the newest episode goes live and we have a ton of ideas around here for the future and we want to be able to let you know about it. An email once per week isn’t going to make you crazy so please go do that so we’re on the same page.  

I also want to let you know about our Facebook page AND our separate Facebook group because they’re important supplements to the podcast. Both are called Chiropractic Forward oddly enough. On the page, we let you all know when a new episode goes live and we share some quotes from the episodes. Through the private Facebook group, we share the papers we went over and lots of time we connect and discuss there so go join up and let’s connect.

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

You have done the mashed potato all James Brown, 60’s style into Episode #41. You know what that means? It means it’s going to be cooler than usual episode. 

Dr. William Lawson, Austin, TX

That’s because, as I mentioned before, we have a guest with us. Dr. William Lawson hails from Austin, TX and has his Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedists designation. Yes, ladies and gentleman, I brought another DACO to you today. Last week, we had Dr. Brandon Steele, also a DACO, so you may be starting to notice a slight trend. We are going to get into the thick of things with research for neck pain.

I met Dr. Lawson through his involvement in the Texas Chiropractic Association. Dr. Lawson is responsible for getting the DACO program to come to Texas and for having the TCA host the program. He’s responsible in a roundabout way for getting me into this whole DACO mess and I thank him for it. 

A little more about Dr. Lawson

  • Prior to attending Parker College of Chiropractic in Dallas, -Texas, I served in the United States Air Force.
  • Graduated from Parker College of Chiropractic 1993.
  • Designated Doctor with Tx Workers Compensation since 1996
  • He has the Diplomate American Academy of Integrative Medicine, college of pain management, 2000.
  • Dr. Lawson acheived Diplomate American Academy of Pain Management 2001.
  • Diplomate American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedists, 2002
  • Certified in acupuncture, 2004
  • Former hospital privileges Vista Hospital Houston and Pecan Valley Surgical Center in San Antonio.
  • Masters degree from UT Pan American in Health Care Administration, 2015
  • Current Chair of State Affairs with TCA
  • Current VP of Texas Council of Chiropractic Orthopedists.

Welcome to the show Dr. Lawson. Since we are friends, formality seems awkward, if you call me Jeff, I’ll call you what? William or Bill? 

Questions for Dr. Lawson

When did you become a DACO and what was the impetus? What started that journey?

What have you noticed about yourself and about your business in regards to pre-DACO and post-DACO?

Let’s get into the research for neck pain. The first thing I want to say here is that we cannot talk about cervical manipulation without addressing the yoke the medical field has tried to lay on us for generations. That is the myth that chiropractors go around causing strokes in everyone all the time. 

I took three episodes of this podcast to address this myth. The series is called “DEBUNKED: The Odd Myth That Chiropractors Cause Strokes” and are specifically episodes #13, #14, and #15. It’s just common sense talk and, if you have any questions in your mind prior to listening to them, they should all be answered by the time you are done. 

I will link them in the show notes as well as the corresponding YouTube Video and the Blog so that you can get the information in your preferred method. 

PODCAST EPISODES:

BLOG:

YOUTUBE:

https://youtu.be/tRXpG_Ie0Rs

Now that we’ve addressed this craziness, we can get on with how well we take care of our neck pain patients. 

Dr. Lawson, I want to hear from you as much as you want to be heard from so, please….if I cover something that you have some extra info on or you just want to add a comment to, please interrupt me and lay it on us!!

We’ll start with the oldest one we have tee-d up here and go to the most recent. 

This first one is from 2001 and is called “A randomized clinical trial of exercise and spinal manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain[1].” The lead author is G. Bronfort and, if I recall correctly, his full first name is Gert. If you’ve spent any time listening to our podcast, you’ve probably heard his name. He’s fairly prolific with research papers. 

Why They Did It

Their stated goal for this project was to compare the effectiveness of rehab exercises vs. spinal manipulation for chronic neck pain. This one really focuses on research for neck pain.

What They Found

  • Patient satisfaction was higher spinal manipulation + exercise was superior to spinal manipulation alone
  • There was no statistical difference noted between the two groups
  • However, when combined, exercise + manipulation showed greater gains in all measures of strength, endurance, and range of motion. 

Wrap It Up

The authors concluded, “For chronic neck pain, the use of strengthening exercise, whether in combination with spinal manipulation or in the form of a high-technology MedX program, appears to be more beneficial to patients with chronic neck pain than the use of spinal manipulation alone.”

Dr. Lawson, what’s your take on this study? At this point, it’s 17 years old. Is it relevant still and how?

Next paper, this one’s called, “Chronic mechanical neck pain in adults treated by manual therapy: a systematic review of change scores in randomized clinical trials[2].” It is by H. Vernon, et. al. and was published in the Journal of Manipulative Physiological Therapeutics in 2007. 

Why They Did It

This was a systematic analysis of effectiveness in randomized clinical trials of chronic neck pain. The stipulations here are that the neck pain could not be caused by whiplash and could not include a headache or arm pain. Just straight up chronic neck pain. 

What They Found

Out of 1980 papers, they found 16 to accept and include in this project. 

No trials included trigger point therapy or manual traction

Wrap It Up

“There is moderate- to high-quality evidence that subjects with chronic neck pain not due to whiplash and without arm pain and headaches show clinically important improvements from a course of spinal manipulation or mobilization at 6, 12, and up to 104 weeks post-treatment. The current evidence does not support a similar level of benefit from massage.”

Dr. Lawson, on this study, for those that don’t know research hierarchy, a randomized clinical trial is some of the more reliable, solid research for neck pain wouldn’t you agree?

The only thing more impactful in the research world than randomized clinical trials are meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Well, this is a systematic review of 16 randomized clinical trials. 

My point being: this is a reliable systematic review. No doubt about it. This is a great paper, Dr. Lawson and I have no idea how it’s escaped me 11 years into this thing. I have other papers by the same group of authors but somehow missed this research for neck pain?

Would you like to add any comments on this paper?

OK, moving on, this paper is called, “Spinal manipulation, medication, or home exercise with advice for acute and subacute neck pain: a randomized trial[3].” This one comes to us by G. Bronfort, et. al. as well and was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2012. 

This is not my favorite research for neck pain as we’ll talk about after we go through the conclusion. 

Why They Did It

“To determine the relative efficacy of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT), medication, and home exercise with advice (HEA) for acute and subacute neck pain in both the short and long term.”

How They Did It

  • It was a randomized controlled trial
  • They used 1 university research center and 1 pain management clinic in Minnesota
  • The sample was 272 people from 18-65 years old having nonspecific neck pain from 2-12 weeks
  • The treatment consisted of 12 weeks of spinal manipulative therapy or home exercise advice. 

What They Found

For pain, SMT had a statistically significant advantage over medication after 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks

Home exercise was superior to medication at 26 weeks

No important differences in pain were found between SMT and HEA at any time point

Wrap It Up

Bronfort concluded, “For participants with acute and subacute neck pain, SMT was more effective than medication in both the short and long term. However, a few instructional sessions of HEA resulted in similar outcomes at most time points.”

As I mentioned, I have covered this research for neck pain before but it’s not my favorite because this is also a paper that I have seen chiropractic detractors use against us. Here’s how: they say that cervical manipulation is extremely risky and, if the outcome of simple exercises at home is just as effective, then what’s the point in cervical manipulation for neck pain?

What would you say in response to this particular argument?

Keepin on keepin on here. This next one is from the Journal of Manipulative Physiological and Therapeutics back in 2014 called “Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with neck pain[4].” This one was done by Bryans, et. al. 

Why They Did It

They wanted to develop evidence-based treatment recommendations for the treatment of nonspecific mechanical neck pain in adults. 

How They Did It

They did a systematic literature search of controlled clinical trials published through December of 2011 and then organized each into strong, moderate, weak, or conflicting)

What They Found

41 randomized controlled trials met the criteria for inclusion. 

Strong recommendations were made for the treatment of chronic neck pain with manipulation, manual therapy, and exercise combined with modalities. 

Strong recommendations were also made for treating chronic neck pain with stretching, strengthening, and endurance exercises alone. 

Moderate recommendations were made for the treatment of acute neck pain with manipulation and mobilization in combination with other modalities. 

Wrap It Up

The authors closed by saying, “Interventions commonly used in chiropractic care improve outcomes for the treatment of acute and chronic neck pain. Increased benefit has been shown in several instances where a multimodal approach to neck pain has been used.”

Do you feel like this is going a little more in our favor than the Bronfort paper but still leaves a little to be desired? For instance, when we look at low back pain papers, it’s clear. Spinal manipulation is as effective or more effective than anything else out there. Even physical therapy or exercise. We’re not getting that satisfaction so far. Am I wrong?

We’re trucking along here. Next paper titled “Mobilization versus manipulations versus sustain apophyseal natural glide techniques and interaction with psychological factors for patients with chronic neck pain: randomized controlled trial[5].” This one was published in European Journal of Physical Rehabilitation Medicine in 2015 and written by A. Lopez-Lopez, et. al. 

Here’s my first question: “Why would you hyphenate the same name?” How can you be Lopez-Lopez and why would you want to say the name twice or make everyone else say the name twice? Isn’t it a bit redundant? Can we just say Lopez and move on?

OK, I get side-tracked sometimes so I have to get myself back on track here and there. Since I’m not familiar with this paper or the authors at all, I want to switch it up a little on this one. 

Dr. Lawson Covers One

I want Dr. Lawson to go over this paper from top to bottom and tell us everything we need to know about this one. I see it’s a randomized controlled trial so it already has my attention. I’m unfamiliar with sustain natural glide (AKA SNAG). Is that term you are familiar with? This research for neck pain is all yours doc. 

Their conclusion was “The results suggest that high velocity/low amplitude and posterior to anterior mobilization groups relieved pain at rest more than SNAG in patients with neck pain.”

Let’s get to our last paper here by Korthalis-de-bos, et. al. It’s called “Cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and general practitioner care for neck pain: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial[6].” It was published in the British Medical Journal back in 2003. 

Why They Did It

The authors wanted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of physical therapy, manual therapy, and care by a general practitioner for patients with neck pain.

How They Did It

  • The project was an economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial.
  • 42 general practitioners recruited 183 neck pain patients
  • The patients were randomly split for treatment by spinal mobilization, physical therapy, or general practitioner care. 

What They Found

The authors wrapped that research for neck pain up by saying, “Manual therapy which consisted of spinal mobilization, is more effective and less costly for treating neck pain than physiotherapy or care by a general practitioner.”

I wanted to wrap up our talk with that research for neck pain because, first of all, it’s from the British Medical Journal so it got some weight. Second it’s alongside randomized controlled trials, and third, it’s one of the main ones that cuts through the noise and says very clearly, “mobilizing the spine is more effective and cost less for neck pain than seeing your primary or a physical therapist.”

Is it just me or is it time to move focus from low back pain and put more effort an attention on how effectively we treat neck pain through research for neck pain?

It just makes complete sense to me. If we are so effective for low back pain in the eyes of researchers, why don’t we have the same pile of research for neck pain? Where is all of the research for neck pain? Both are mechanical in origin. If we can affect low back pain, it makes perfect sense that we can affect neck pain. 

Chiropractors see it every single day. I’m not telling you anything. I just get so frustrated at the lack of focus on neck pain, which is part of the reason we’re doing this podcast today. 

Dr. Lawson, what do you have to add here before we sign off?

I want to thank you for joining us on the Chiropractic Forward Podcast. I hope you’ve enjoyed it as much as I have. 

Maybe we talk some DC PhD’s out there into making neck pain their next project. 

Integrating Chiropractors

 

Going forward

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

The literature is clear: research on neck pain and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability. It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Contact Us

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & VloggerBibliography

1. Bronfort G, A randomized clinical trial of exercise and spinal manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2001. 26(7): p. 788-97.

2. Vernon H, H.B., Chronic mechanical neck pain in adults treated by manual therapy: a systematic review of change scores in randomized clinical trials. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2007. 30(6): p. 473-8.

3. Bronfort G, Spinal Manipulation, Medication, or Home Exercise With Advice for Acute and Subacute Neck Pain: A Randomized Trial. Annals of Internal Medicine 2012. Ann Intern Med, 2012. 156(1): p. 1-10.

4. Bryans R, Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with neck pain. J Manipulative Physiol Ther, 2014. 37(1): p. 42-63.

5. Lopez-Lopez A, Mobilization versus manipulations versus sustain apophyseal natural glide techniques and interaction with psychological factors for patients with chronic neck pain: randomized controlled trial. Eur J Phys Rehabil Med, 2015. 51(2): p. 121-32.

6. Korthals-de Bos IB, Cost effectiveness of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and general practitioner care for neck pain: economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial. British Medical Journal, 2003. 326(7395): p. 911.

 

CF 013: DEBUNKED: The Odd Myth That Chiropractors Cause Strokes (Part 1 of 3)

CF 030: Integrating Chiropractors – What’s It Going To Take?

CF 020: Chiropractic Evolution or Extinction?

CF 039: Communicating Chiropractic

CF 040: w/ Dr. Brandon Steele: Chiropractic Standardization & The Future of Chiropractic

w/ Dr. Brandon Steele: Chiropractic Standardization & The Future of Chiropractic

Today we’re going to talk with Dr. Brandon Steele about a lot of stuff but specifically, we’ll talk about Chiropractic standardization, educational advancement, and the future of chiropractic. Stick around for an awesome discussion with an extremely sharp doctor on the forefront of our profession.

Integrating Chiropractors

But first, here’s that bumper music

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

Now that I have you here, I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. It makes it easier to let you know when the newest episode goes live and if we come up with something pretty cool we need to be telling you about. We won’t use it any more than once per week and that’s about all you need to know. It’s not as big of a deal as most of you have in your mind. Just go do it right now while you’re thinking about it. 

We continue to grow our listenership here. I’m a stats nerd. Trust me, I check them more than what one may consider a healthy amount of times. It’s just who I am. Thank you to you all for tuning in. 

If you can continue to share us with your network, we sure would appreciate it. 

We are honored to have you listening. Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

You have passed out and woke up right here in Episode #40

Welcome Dr. Brandon Steele

We have a special guest with us this week. As I said from the top we have Dr. Brandon Steele with us today. He is a very respected speaker and has the awesome chance to travel all over doing just that. 

I first became aware of Dr. Steele when I began taking courses in the DACO program. Dr. Steele is one of the instructors and I got to sit in a classroom for two days listening to him cover everything we needed to know about the shoulder. 

I also much have some full disclosure here I think. Dr. Steele is a co-owner of ChiroUp with Dr. Tim Bertlesman and I’m a user/subscriber of ChiroUp. But, ChiroUp isn’t sponsoring this episode. I haven’t received a thing from them. Not even a free membership. Cough cough… 

Seriously though, I’m having Dr. Steele on today because we think a lot alike from what I can tell, I love what they are doing with the DACO program, and I love where I think ChiroUp can help take our industry down the road in regards to Chiropractic standardization & the future of chiropractic. So, without further adieu…….

Questions for Dr. Brandon Steele

Welcome to the show Dr. Steele. Let’s start off with the obligatory question of, “What made you decide to be a chiropractor?”

In our discussion in Dallas, you told me that you’ve moved around a bit. Where are you from and what led you to St. Louis?

I have seen the terms evidence-based and evidence-informed used for what we do and must admit my ignorance of the subtle differences here. I have assumed that, since I follow research, guidelines, and things like that, that I am indeed what is referred to as an evidence-based chiropractor. Can we assume the same about you? 

When exactly did you decide to start traveling more in the direction of evidence and research rather than the philosophical route in the profession? Was there an aha moment?

Tell me a little bit about your hilarious alter-ego, the wide-lapeled chiropractic huckster we see you play in videos from time to time on the ChiroUp Facebook page. 

Part of the idea of being more into the research and being based or informed with the evidence, I think, is Chiropractic standardization…. to standardize our profession to some extent as well as increasing the level of education of the run of the mill chiropractor. We know we don’t have a low level of education at all so….can you go into that a little bit for us? What do you mean when you speak about Chiropractic standardization & the future of chiropractic?

Tell me everything about the DACO program. What got you involved with the DACO program originally?

Our regular listeners should be well-aware of you, Dr. Tim Bertlesman, and ChiroUp at this point. I’ve been pumping your tires for a bit. How did you and Dr. Bertlesman become acquainted with each other and then decide to go into business together?

Questions About ChiroUp, Chiropractic Standardization, and the Future of Chiropractic

Now, tell us a bit about ChiroUp. It feels like to me that it is really starting to hit its stride. I think ChiroUp is huge for Chiropractic standardization & the future of chiropractic.

Obviously, you want it to be successful for your own financial reasons….we all want to see our businesses to well….. but don’t you see something more than that for the profession coming out of ChiroUp? How do you think ChiroUp can affect or change our profession for the better in the years to come, for the future of chiropractic?

What is in the future for ChiroUp as far as updates, functionality…..things like that?

Questions About Dr. Steele’s Speaking Events

What are some of your upcoming speaking events so people can come to see you do your thing?

How can listeners find you on social media or on the internet and contact you or learn more about you and what you do?

So there you have it folks, Dr. Brandon Steele. There’s no doubt you loved this podcast episode as much as I did. The future is bright for Chiropractic standardization & the future of chiropractic.

Integrating Chiropractors

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio. That’s because spinal pain is a mechanical pain and responds better to mechanical treatment instead of chemical treatments.

Chiropractic Description

The literature is clear: research and experience show that, in 80%-90% of headaches, neck, and back pain, patients get good to excellent results when compared to usual medical care and it’s safe, less expensive, and decreases chances of surgery and disability.

It’s done conservatively and non-surgically with little time requirement or hassle for the patient. If done preventatively going forward, we can likely keep it that way while raising overall health! At the end of the day, patients have the right to the best treatment that does the least harm and THAT’S Chiropractic, folks.

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Being the the #1 Chiropractic podcast in the world would be pretty darn cool. 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

▶︎Website

http://www.chiropracticforward.com

▶︎Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

▶︎iTunes

▶︎Player FM Link

▶︎Stitcher:

▶︎TuneIn

About the author:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger