chiropractor in amarillo

Western Diet Hurts and Acupuncture

 CF 186: Western Diet Hurts and Acupuncture Today we’re going to talk about new research based on chronic pain and our regular Western diet. Then we discuss  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

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  OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #186 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about high impact chronic pain and we talked about newer research on the use of cannabinoids in adolescence. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

I’m feeling pretty good today, folks. I’m feeling pretty optimistic. If I had known what a process building a medical clinic truly is, I may have thought it through just a little bit more than I did. There really is a solid reason more chiropractors don’t take the steps to do it. And that’s because it isn’t easy.  Attorneys, medical directors, hiring the nurse pracs, setting up training, getting the malpractice in place, getting the DEA number of the medical director to have your address on it so your NP can order the things they need, getting your NP credentialed, getting the entities created correctly by the CPAs……it’s a process for damn sure. 

I remember when I started this path, my good buddy and consultant on it, Dr. Tyce Hergert in Southlake, TX, he told me get your seatbelt on because the majority of the work is in the first 90 days. I feel like it’s starting to loosen up a bit and the clouds are clearing on this integration deal. Which is exciting. Because then you can go from wading through the paperwork and minutiae and start focusing on their training and growing the word of mouth and actually start working on the business. That’s where my skill level lies.  I’m not 100% out of the initial struggle to get it set up and off the ground but I’m getting toward the rear end of it and that’s encouraging. For instance, my morning this morning was setting up an account with a medical supplies company and getting started with my first order of IV equipment, cotton swabs, medipore tape, and things of that nature.  Right…..I know…..ugh.

But it’ll be worth it eventually. At least it damn sure better be! Beyond that, last week was better as far as clinic numbers. Moving in the right direction. I believe as a solo practitioner I had about 167. Still not pre-COVID numbers but not awful. I can deal with stuff mentally when I know it’s moving the right direction. It’s when it’s staying slim and there’s no longer rhyme or reason for it that makes me lose my mind. 

So, the mind is intact today and I’m looking forward. Onward and upward today.  Still no emails from any of you on what you’ve done to help the rest of you get your patients back. So, any help and advice from the think tank here would be good for the rest of the crew. Share. Give. It’ good for you. 

Item #1

This first one his an article that appeared in the Seattle Times called “Study finds correlation between high-fat Western diet and pain” by Theresa Braine of the New York Daily News (Braine 2021). It was published on June 24, 2021 and it’s hotter than hot stuff! And on a side note, You’d be in a hell of an awkward position if you last name was Braine but you were an idiot wouldn’t you? Think about that a minute. Your name is brain but you’re basically walking around bumping into walls…..people snickering behind your back…..Brain….right, right.  Anyway, that’s a little peak into my brain for you.

Anyway…since it’s an article, as always I just basically summarize and hit the high spots. 

  • They say the Western diet is associate with many ills and now chronic pain might be added to the list. 
  • A new study looks at the potential for omega-6 fats’ influence on neuropathic pain in people with diabetes and other conditions.
  • Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio studied the effects of omega-6 fatty acids themselves by measuring the role of these dietary lipids in pain conditions and found that the substances themselves seem to cause pain and inflammation.
  • Diabetes, autoimmune disorders and cardiovascular diseases are known to be affected by nutritional choices, the researchers said. But excessive consumption of omega-6 fats, which are found largely in commonly consumed processed foods, had not been studied in terms of the acids themselves and their role specifically in pain.
  • They studied polyunsaturated fatty acids in both mice and humans.
  • The five-year study was published in the June edition of the journal Nature Metabolism.
  • Omega-6 fats mainly occur in foods with vegetable oils
  • “But Western diets associated with obesity are characterized by much-higher levels of those acids in foods from corn chips to onion rings, than healthy omega-3 fats, which are found in fish and sources like flaxseed and walnuts,” the researchers’ statement said. “Generally, unhealthy foods high in omega-6 fats include processed snacks, fast foods, cakes, and fatty and cured meats, among others.”
  • Reversing those dietary habits and increasing omega-3 fats “greatly reduced these pain conditions,” the researchers found. “Also, the authors demonstrated that skin levels of omega-6 lipids in patients with Type 2 diabetic neuropathic pain were strongly associated with reported pain levels and the need for taking analgesic drugs.”

So, we’re seeing more and more studies like this talking about inflammatory diets, high-fat, and things of that nature. All being related to increased levels of pain. This is something chiropractors can get behind. I can be very honest when I say that the main gap missing in my clinic is weight loss. Diet and nutrition. Things of that nature. As a result, I’m having our nurse practitioner trained in medical weight loss so we can fill that gap and be well-rounded. 

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Item #2

Next up, I’ve been asked to put together a talk based on evidence-based, patient-centered practice and what makes it the future of our profession. The special request was to end the talk with some research-based around acupuncture research. Texas chiropractors continue to go through battles and one of them is against the acupuncturists in the state.  So, with that, I’m going to offer up a couple of papers. I’ve got a bunch of good ones but thought I’d just cover a couple here. The first one is called “Clinical Evidence for Association of Acupuncture and Acupressure With Improved Cancer Pain A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” by He et. al. (He Y 2019) and published in JAMA Oncology on December 19, 2019 and it goes a little sumpin’ like this. 

The first thing that jumps out here, especially for those somewhat new to reading through research, is that this is a systematic review and meta-analysis. That is at the top of the research pyramid. For example simple little case studies and animal studies, pilot studies….things of that nature….they live at the bottom, less meaningful or less impactful part of the pyramid. As you climb the pyramid to the more important stuff, you’ll see cohort studies and randomized controlled trials. Then, at the very top, the most meaningful studies are the systematic reviews topped off by the meta-analysis.  What I’m saying is that this paper is good stuff. It’s good information. And it appears in a very respected journal. The Journal of the American Medical Association’s Oncology branch. It’s high level from several aspects.  

Why They Did It

The authors wanted to answer the question, “Is the use of acupuncture and acupressure associated with improved cancer pain management compared with sham intervention and/or analgesic therapy alone?

How They Did It

  • It was a systematic review of 17 randomized clinical trials and meta-analysis of 14 trials in the current English-language and Chinese-language literature
  • Three English-language databases and 4 Chinese-language biomedical databases were searched for RCTs published from database inception through March 31, 2019.
  • Randomized clinical trials that compared acupuncture and acupressure with a sham control, analgesic therapy, or usual care for managing cancer pain were included.
  • The quality of RCTs was appraised with the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool
  • The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by the Brief Pain Inventory, Numerical Rating Scale, Visual Analog Scale, or Verbal Rating Scale.

What They Found

A significant association was found between real (compared with sham) acupuncture and reduced pain, and acupuncture combined with analgesic therapy was associated with decreased analgesic use. However, heterogeneity lowered the level of certainty of the evidence.

Wrap It Up

This study found a moderate level of evidence that acupuncture and/or acupressure was significantly associated with lower pain intensity in patients with cancer compared with a sham control, which suggests a potential for a combination of acupuncture and acupressure to help reduce opioid doses in patients with cancer.

Item #3

This last one is called “Acupuncture for neck disorders (Review for The Cochrane Collaboration)” by Trinh et. al. (Trinh K 2016) and it can be found in the Cochrane Library published in May of 2016 so it’s about 5 years old at this point. 

Why They Did It

  • Acupuncture has been used as an alternative to more conventional treatment for musculoskeletal pain. This review summarises the most current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute, subacute and chronic neck pain.
  • To determine the effects of acupuncture for adults with neck pain, with focus on pain relief, disability or functional measures, patient satisfaction and global perceived effect.

How They Did It

  • They searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy Index System (MANTIS), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) from their beginning to August 2015
  • They searched reference lists, two trial registers and the acupuncture database Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS) in China to 2005.
  • We included published trials that used random assignment to intervention groups, in full text or abstract form. We excluded quasi-randomized controlled trials 
  • Of the 27 included studies, three represented individuals with whiplash‐associated disorders (WADs) ranging from acute to chronic (205 participants), five explored chronic myofascial neck pain (186 participants), five chronic pain due to arthritic changes (542 participants), six chronic non‐specific neck pain (4011 participants), two neck pain with radicular signs (43 participants) and six subacute or chronic mechanical neck pain (5111 participants). So there was a big mix of conditions represented with a solid sample size when you add them all up. 

What They Found

  • For mechanical neck pain, we found that acupuncture is beneficial at immediate‐term follow‐up compared with sham acupuncture for pain intensity; at short‐term follow‐up compared with sham or inactive treatment for pain intensity; at short‐term follow‐up compared with sham treatment for disability; and at short‐term follow‐up compared with wait‐list control for pain intensity and neck disability improvement.
  • This effect does not seem sustainable over the long term. Whether subsequent repeated sessions would be successful was not examined by investigators in our primary studies.

Wrap It Up

Moderate‐quality evidence suggests that acupuncture relieves pain better than sham acupuncture, as measured at completion of treatment and at short‐term follow‐up, and that those who received acupuncture report less pain and disability at short‐term follow‐up than those on a wait‐list. Moderate‐quality evidence also indicates that acupuncture is more effective than inactive treatment for relieving pain at short‐term follow‐up. Alright, for those not yet on the acupuncture train, take another look.

The VA here locally are sending veterans to us right now for our acupuncturist to work with them and these old grizzly vets absolutely love it. Yep, that’s anecdotal as hell but I’m telling you, there’s something to it and research seems to be catching up to it.  Patients ask me how it works and I have to be honest……I’m not sure. I have some guesses but it’s a lot like a damn TV. I can’t tell you the exact way a program’s signal gets to my house and shows up when I turn the damn TV on. But I know how to enjoy the results.  Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B096RST3WW

 

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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  The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disabilities and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

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Home

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

  • Braine, T. (2021). Study finds correlation between high-fat Western diet and pain. Seattle Times.
  • He Y, G. X., May BH, (2019). “Clinical Evidence for Association of Acupuncture and Acupressure With Improved Cancer Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” JAMA Oncol 6(2): 271-278.
  • Trinh K, G. N., Irnich D, Cameron ID, Forget M (2016). “Acupuncture for neck disorders. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2016,.” Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 5.

 

Predicting Frailty & A 30-Year Study On Disc Degeneration

CF 184: Predicting Frailty & A 30-Year Study On Disc Degeneration Today we’re going to talk about using bone or musculoskeletal parameters to predict frailty and then we’ll cover a 30-year study on disc degeneration. Sit tight and chew on the morsels of knowledge we’re about to dish up for you.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music  

Purchase Dr. Williams book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. We’re the Metallica of chiropractic research……if there is such a thing. 

Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #1844

Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about the factors leading to surgery for some discs and then we talked about recent information concerning disc innervation and what happens when a disc is injured. 

Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

So for personal happening this week, we are getting the training set up for a nurse practitioner down in Dallas. Our medical Director is good enough that he would like to be trained on what the nurse practitioner is doing as well. That means good things for us. 

When the medical Director is on board with the nurse practitioner, nothing but good happens. 

I’m still promoting and pushing my book. The one I’d love for you to purchase called “‘The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research’. It’s on Amazon and you can find the link on my homepage at chiropractscforward.com so go give it a look-see and a purchase. You can get it in paperback and as an ebook. 

This is an amazing resource for you practitioners in the field. Definitely for you content creators. Whether you’re looking for info to post on your social media, whether you’re teaching your patients and need material, or it you’re putting together a speech you need to give to a group……THIS is your resource to make your life easier and to save time. Seriously. Just flip to the topic and pick out the papers you like. BOOM….done. 

I noticed that the forward thinking chiropractic alliance had their fire event this past weekend. With all of the things I’m involved in, I was unable to attend either live or online. 

But, I purchased the online package so will be reviewing it when it is available online. It was all about implementing rehab into your practice and making money doing it. I love rehab and exercise being a part of my every day practice so I’m looking forward to waiting through all of the information. I am still trudging through the forensics fellowship and I have to say, it is not material that I enjoy. In fact, it’s pretty awful. 

But, with the forensics fellowship being a subsidiary of the orthopedics fellowship that I already went through, I only have to do 100 hours rather than 300 so there’s no reason to not do it. So, I am begrudgingly going through it. It feels like I would assume running through quicksand feels. I hate the material but I plan on enjoying The final results. 

Also, as part of the Parker CBI program, I have an intern coming on board. He’s going to move out to Amarillo for a semester and follow us around and work in the office starting in September. 

Throw that in on top of a nurse practitioner starting full-time with us on August 2, and I should have my hands full. This podcast is getting more and more challenging to write produce and record every week. Depending on how all of this goes in the fall, I may be forced to begin releasing an episode every two weeks rather than every week. Stay tuned. That decision is on the horizon. 

Other than all of that, I am involved in all of my extracurricular activities as well.

I am still going to the track and throw in the shot put and discus on the weekends and planning on competing in some masters events next spring and summer. Still trying to lose weight and stay involved in working out and being in the healthy lifestyle. And I’m still busy doing all of my artwork that I’ve been doing all along. 

If you’re interested in any of that you can find it on Facebook at Jeff Williams art. If I was that weren’t enough, I’m busy putting together a new band and music projectWell my voiceover career is also expanding and growing and growing a little bit crazy at the moment. You could say my cup runneth over exponentially. 

For that reason, let’s get on with the research.

Item #1

The first one is called “Disc Degeneration of Young Low Back Pain Patients: A Prospective 30-year Follow-up MRI Study” by Saaksjarvi et al. (Sääksjärvi S 2020) and published in Spine Journal in October of 2020 which is cooling off but still pretty damn steamy. Hot enough to eat. 

Why They Did It

The aim of this study was to investigate whether early lumbar disc degeneration (DD) in young low back pain (LBP) patients predicts progression of degenerative changes, pain, or disability in a 30-year follow-up

How They Did It

  • A prospective follow-up study.
  • In an earlier study, 75 conscripts aged 20 years with LBP had their lumbar spine examined by MRI. 
  • At a follow-up of 30 years, the subjects were contacted; 
  • 35 of 69 filled a pain and disability questionnaire, 
  • and 26 of 35 were also reexamined clinically and by MRI. 
  • The images were evaluated for decreased signal intensity and other degenerative changes. 
  • Association between decreased signal intensity of a disc at baseline and the presence of more severe degenerative changes in the same disc space at follow-up was analyzed using Fisher exact test. 
  • Association between decreased baseline signal intensity and pain/disability scores from the questionnaire was analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis H test.

What They Found

  • The total number of lumbar discs with decreased signal intensity increased from 23 of 130 to 92 of 130 
  • Distribution of DD changed from being mostly in L4-L5 and L5-S1 discs to being almost even between the four lowermost discs. Discs that had even slightly decreased signal intensity at baseline were more likely to have severely decreased signal intensity at follow-up, compared to healthy discs. 
  • Other degenerative changes were also more common in these discs. 
  • Severity of DD at baseline did not have a significant association with current pain or disability.

Wrap It Up

In young LBP patients, early degeneration in lumbar discs predicts progressive degenerative changes in the respective discs, but not pain, disability, or clinical symptoms.

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Item #2

Our last one today is called “The Predictability of Frailty Associated with Musculoskeletal Deficits: A Longitudinal Study” by Tembo et. al. (Tembo 2021)       and published in Calcified Tissue International in 2021….ouch….don’t touch it…..it sizzles. 

And honestly….who the hell knew there was an entire damn journal called calcified tissue international?? How damn niche can you get?? For reals. And don’t tell me it’s pronounced nish because I’m just going to kick you in the shin if we meet in person. I’m going with niche because there are riches in niches. Not in nishes so don’t do it. 

Why They Did It

How They Did It

  • This longitudinal study included 287 men aged ≥ 50 yr at baseline (2001–2006) from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study
  • Baseline musculoskeletal measures included femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD), appendicular lean mass index (ALMI, kg/m2) and whole-body fat mass index (FMI, kg/m2) and lower-limb strength
  • Frailty at the 15 yr-follow-up (2016–2019) was defined as ≥ 3 and non-frail as < 3, of the following: unintentional weight loss, weakness, low physical activity, exhaustion, and slowness
  • Potential confounders included anthropometry, smoking, alcohol, FMI, socioeconomic status and comorbidities

What They Found

  • Forty-eight (16.7%) men were frail at 15 yr-follow-up.
  • Musculoskeletal models were better predictors of frailty
  • Musculoskeletal parameters improved the predictability model for frailty after 15 years

Wrap It Up

In general, muscle models performed better compared to bone models. Musculoskeletal parameters improved the predictability of frailty of the referent model that included lifestyle factors. Muscle deficits accounted for a greater proportion of the risk for frailty than did bone deficits. Targeting musculoskeletal health could be a possible avenue of intervention in regards to frailty.

And now you know…..the rest of the story….

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

 

Purchase Dr. Williams book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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  The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website https://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

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TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger  

Bibliography

Sääksjärvi S, K. L., Luoma K, Paajanen H, Waris E, (2020). “Disc Degeneration of Young Low Back Pain Patients: A Prospective 30-year Follow-up MRI Study.” Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 45(19): 1341-1347.  

Tembo, M. C., Mohebbi, M., Holloway-Kew, K.L, (2021). “The Predictability of Frailty Associated with Musculoskeletal Deficits: A Longitudinal Study.” Calcified Tissue Int.    

What Sitting On Your Butt Will Get You & Catastrophizing An MRI Result

CF 180: What Sitting On Your Butt Will Get You & Catastrophizing An MRI Result Today we’re going to talk about sitting on your butt and we’ll talk about catastrophizing from an image.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #180 Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about the alarming rising death rate among the working-age population and we discussed the role nutrition can play in chronic pain. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

It’s going to be a short one this week. I have to fit a full week if work responsibilities into three days because I’m taking off Thursday through Tuesday. My wife and kids and I are heading out to New Orleans to get fat and drink funny drinks.  I love Louisiana. I was in the football team at West Texas State for one semester before transferring to Northwestern Louisiana in Natchitoches. Same town Steel Magnolias was filmed in. Absolutely gorgeous. Going from the Texas Panhandle to Louisiana was a culture shock y’all. Whole different wonderful world. I tell people that you simply cannot spend any amount of real-time in Louisiana without absolutely falling in love with the people, the music, the culture, the food…..the VIBE. It’s special. We like to travel. I’ve told you here several times that you need a trip at least once per quarter. Something to look forward to. Something to work toward.  Once we see a place, it’s time to move on and see something else. There are too many places to see in the world to be going back to the same ol’ places all of the time.

Except for New Orleans. We go back just as often as we get the opportunity to.

It’s somewhat close and we love it So, we’re going this week. And I have to keep it short. The medical integration is going slowly. Business is steady but not Pre- Covid numbers. I’m frustrated with that if Imm. Ring honest and I’m always honest with you all. It’s really kind of pissing me off. But I’m a Christian. It’s not always in my hands. Good luck looks a whole lot like hard hard work. So do what’s right. Treat people right. Love folks. It’ll work out. Just be prepared and try to be a learn it all instead of a know it all. Here we go. But first, let’s hear from our amazing, practice-changing sponsors!

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #1

The first item up is called “The Association Between Leisure-time Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Low Back Pain: A Cross-sectional Analysis in Primary Care Settings” by Lemes, et. al. [1] and published in Spine Journal on May 1, 2021 Hot tamale, hot tamale….get ‘em while they’re good ’n’ hot!

Why They Did It To investigate the association between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and low back pain (LBP) in adults from primary care settings, and to explore how sedentary behavior influences this association.

How They Did It

  • Cross-sectional analysis of an ongoing longitudinal study with adults from Bauru, Brazil – that was 557 individuals.
  • Data on physical activity, sitting time, LBP, BMI, and chronic diseases were assessed by face-to-face interviews, physical evaluation, and medical records. 
  • Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health variables were used as covariables in the multivariable models.

What They Found

  • The fully adjusted model showed that active participants were 33% less likely to have LBP when compared with those insufficiently active
  • A significant association was found for active participants who spent less than 3 h/day sitting but not for those who spent 3 h/day or more in sedentary activities
  • An inverse association of LTPA with LBP was observed in obese participants, but not in those with normal BMI and overweight.

Wrap It Up

Leisure-time physical activity was inversely associated with the prevalence of LBP in adults from primary care. This association was influenced by sedentary behavior and BMI.

Item #2

Our last one this week is called, “The catastrophization effects of an MRI report on the patient and surgeon and the benefits of ‘clinical reporting’: results from an RCT and blinded trials” by Rajasekaran, et. al. [2] and published in European Spine Journal in March of 2021.  Pork chops and hot sauce. 

Why They Did It Inappropriate use of MRI leads to increasing interventions and surgeries for low back pain (LBP). We probed the potential effects of a routine MRI report on the patient’s perception of his spine and functional outcome of treatment. An alternate ‘clinical reporting’ was developed and tested for benefits on LBP perception.

How They Did It In Phase-I, 44 LBP patients were randomized to Group A who had a factual explanation of their MRI report or Group B, who were reassured that the MRI findings showed normal changes. The outcome was compared at 6 weeks by VAS, PSEQ-2, and SF-12. In Phase-II, clinical reporting was developed, avoiding potential catastrophizing terminologies. In Phase-III, 20 MRIs were reported by both routine and clinical methods. The effects of the two methods were tested on four categories of health care professionals (HCP) who read them blinded on their assessment of the severity of disease, possible treatment required, and the probability of surgery.

What They Found

  • Both groups were comparable initial by demographics and pain. 
  • After 6 weeks of treatment, Group A had a more negative perception of their spinal condition, increased catastrophization, decreased pain improvement, and poorer functional status(p = significant for all). 
  • The alternate method of clinical reporting had significant benefits in the assessment of lesser severity of the disease, shift to lesser severity of intervention and surgery in three groups of HCPs.

Wrap It Up

Routine MRI reports produce a negative perception and poor functional outcomes in LBP. Focused clinical reporting had significant benefits, which calls for the need for ‘clinical reporting’ rather than ‘Image reporting’. Words matter, folks. Words matter. If you’re telling people that they have abnormal degeneration or an abnormally straightened cervical spine and telling them how concerned you are for their future if they don’t spend 70 visits and $5,000 this year to fix it……blah blah blah.  If you’re doing this, you either don’t understand stuff and you need to do a lot more sciencing……or…..or you’re predatory, unethical, and a sorry human being that needs to reconsider how you treat your fellow humans. 

Sorry, I realize that’s harsh. But it’s the truth. If you are taking images and using them to scare people into treatment to build your clinic and your numbers, you are in the wrong business. Go sell cars. This is healthcare and people’s very lives and the quality of their lives are involved.  Learn to communicate in a positive, optimistic manner. Learn to get people moving and functioning.

Learn to address the biopsychosocial aspect of pain. Learn to use it in the patient’s favor, not in your favor. Just learn if you don’t know these things. Raise the game. If you have the chance, and you do, why not just be a big deal then? Let’s all be big deal by being learn it alls. Being ethical, moral, honest, and loving. Oh, and by acting responsibly based on the model of evidence-based, patient-centered care.  We have companies out there teaching chiropractors how to ‘close’ patients. What clowns. That’s clown stuff folks. Don’t do it. Raise the game.  Way too many shenanigans have been going on in this profession for way too long.  Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website https://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter https://twitter.com/Chiro_Forward YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger  

Bibliography

1. Lemes ÍR, P.R., Turi Lynch BC, Codogno JS, Oliveira CB, Ross LM, Araújo Fernandes R, Monteiro HL,, The Association Between Leisure-time Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Low Back Pain: A Cross-sectional Analysis in Primary Care Settings. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2021. 46(9): p. 596-602. 2.

2. Rajasekaran S, D.C.R.S., Pushpa BT, Ananda KB, Ajoy Prasad S, Rishi MK,, The catastrophization effects of an MRI report on the patient and surgeon and the benefits of ‘clinical reporting’: results from an RCT and blinded trials. Eur Spine J, 2021.

Working Class Rising Death Rates & Nutrition Affects Chronic Pain

CF 179: Working Class Rising Death Rates & Nutrition Affects Chronic Pain Today we’re going to talk about the fact that there are rising death rates among folks that are of working-class age. Not just the elderly. Why is that happening? Then we’ll talk about diet and chronic pain.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 
  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 
You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #179 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about  whether chiropractors cause disc herniations or not and we talked about how family doctors still aren’t getting the message. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class.  On the personal end of things….. This medical integration thing is about to take off. Wee ahve the contracts all drawn up, questions answered, and ready to get them all signed.  New EIN, new credentialing for me and the NP, and full steam ahead. Did you know that I have to re-credential under the new entity as well? What a pain in the backside, right? Hell yeah it is. I’m OK referring patients back and forth within the same group. You start to run into risk of getting in trouble with the Stark, anti-kickback laws when you are referring patients back and forth across different entities.  So, yeah….there’s that. I won’t bore you with the particulars but it’s definitely a ride we’re on and it’s go time.  Everything I’ve seen and experienced thus far tells me that we’re in a good spot and things are proceeding fairly smoothly. Slowly but smoothly. Next will be credentialing and that will slow everything down for a couple of months but that’s probably a good thing I’m guessing.  I’m fortunate to have a genius for a wife that understands a lot of the legal end of things that I’m just not talented at. Plus we have an attorney in Austin that literally wrote the integration law that has set it all up for us. And we have Dr. Tyce Hergert with Southlake Physical Medicine consulting us so we have a talented and very smart team.  Surrounding yourself with good people is the first step to success. We can’t be expected to be the smartest expert on everything that we encounter in our personal or professional lives. We need good people in our lives and our network. Good and talented people who have the right kind of heart for our style.  That’s exactly what I have right now so I’m very confident going forward. I don’t take big risks. I take measured, smart risks. That’s exactly where I’m at.  Alright, busy busy this week so let’s get scooting with this episode.  Item #1 This one called “High and Rising Working-Age Mortality in the US. A Report From the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine” by Mullan Harris, et. al. [1] published in JAMA on May 10, 2021. Servin em up steamy and saucy.  Why They Did It They say, “Life expectancy has increased in the US and in the world for the past century. In 2010, life expectancy plateaued in the US while continuing to increase in other high-income nations. In the US, life expectancy declined for 3 consecutive years (2015-2017) due primarily to an increase in mortality among working-age adults (those aged 25-64 years).1 Although the increase in mortality was first described among White middle-aged adults, mortality is now increasing among young and middle-aged adults and in all racial groups. This increase in premature death, claiming lives during the prime working ages, has important implications for individuals, families, communities, employers, and the nation.” They found that average working-age mortality rates decreased after 2010 in 16 high-income countries but increased in the US. Three causes of death were identified as chiefly responsible: (1) drug poisoning and alcohol-induced causes, (2) suicide, and (3) cardiometabolic diseases. The first category includes mortality from mental and behavioral disorders, which often involve drugs or alcohol. Cardiometabolic diseases include endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases (eg, diabetes, obesity); hypertensive heart disease; and ischemic heart disease and other diseases of the circulatory system (eg, arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure). Drug and alcohol use were the largest contributors to increasing mortality among working-age adults, accounting for 8% (an estimated 1.3 million) of deaths in this population between 1990 and 2017 (an average of 44 869 per year). The increase was largest among White male adults and older Black male adults. They go on. They say, “The drug crisis was the product of 2 influences: an increase in access to legal and illegal drugs and the vulnerability of certain populations. The licensing of OxyContin in 1996, subsequent flooding of the market with prescribed opioids, and waves of highly potent heroin and fentanyl that coincided with growing demand for these substances have been described as a perfect storm.3 The drug supply expanded with limited government oversight, substantial marketing by the pharmaceutical industry, and overprescribing by physicians.” With regards to Suicide, they say, “Suicide, which accounted for 569 099 deaths among working-age adults during 1990-2017 (an average of 20 325 per year), increased primarily among White adults, especially White men, and in less populated, rural areas. Few studies have established a cause for this trend. Economic stresses are a possibility; suicide is associated with economic downturns, wage stagnation, weak health care safety nets, and foreclosures.4 Another potential contributing factor is declining social support from churches, civic organizations, and families. Such social supports, which protect against self-harm, have declined in recent decades, especially among lower-educated White adults. Easier access to firearms is associated with increased suicide rates; however, the greater increase in nonfirearm suicides during this period suggests other causes. Other risk factors for suicide include mental illness, comorbid conditions, disability, and substance use.” With regard to cardiometabolic disease they say, “Cardiometabolic diseases caused more than an estimated 4.8 million deaths among working-age adults during 1990-2017 (an average of 173 062 per year). The largest relative increases in cardiometabolic mortality occurred among younger adults (aged 24-44 years) in all racial/ethnic groups, White men and women, Black men (in recent decades), and those living in rural areas. Cardiometabolic mortality rates increased after 2010 for 2 reasons: (1) mortality from endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases and hypertensive heart disease generally increased during 1990-2017 and (2) after a period of substantial reductions in mortality from ischemic heart disease and other circulatory diseases from the 1970s onward, progress stalled after 2010.” “The report discusses 3 explanations for this trend. First, the most important was the increased prevalence of obesity and its cardiometabolic consequences. Obesity rates increased in the early 1980s as a period-based phenomenon that affected the entire population, but the related cardiometabolic consequences occurred in a cohort fashion; younger cohorts born in the 1970s-1990s experienced obesogenic environments their entire lives, whereas exposure in older cohorts was limited to older ages.5 As a result, many young adults are entering their work lives with a high prevalence of chronic diseases associated with obesity. “ “The recent increase in mortality among working-age adults shows no signs of receding. Obesity rates are unrelenting, drug- and alcohol-related deaths and suicide rates, already high among working-age adults, increased during the COVID-19 pandemic” So what does all of that mean? Well, it means we are providers and we need to know this stuff and be aware of it. We need to be able to refer to specialists when we see the signs of drug or alcohol abuse, suicidal tendencies, or nutritional concerns.  It’s not just a, “‘hey he should get his crap together while he still can.” It’s a little more immediate than that I think .  CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT Item #2 Item 2 today is called “Dietary Interventions Are Beneficial for Patients with Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis”” by Field et. al. [2] published in Pain Medicine on November 17, 2020 and that’s a bit roasty.  Why They Did It The standard Western diet is high in processed hyperpalatable foods that displace nutrient-dense whole foods, leading to inflammation and oxidative stress. There is limited research on how these adverse metabolic drivers may be associated with maladaptive neuroplasticity seen in chronic pain and whether this could be attenuated by a targeted nutritional approach. The aim of this study was to review the evidence for whole-food dietary interventions in chronic pain management. How They Did It
  • A structured search of eight databases was performed up to December 2019.
  • A meta-analysis was performed in Review Manager.
  • Forty-three studies reporting on 48 chronic pain groups receiving a whole-food dietary intervention were identified
What They Found
  • A visual analog scale was the most commonly reported pain outcome measure, with 17 groups reporting a clinically objective improvement
  • Twenty-seven studies reported significant improvement on secondary metabolic measures.
  • Twenty-five groups were included in a meta-analysis that showed a significant finding for the effect of diet on pain reduction when grouped by diet type or chronic pain type.
Wrap It Up There is an overall positive effect of whole-food diets on pain, with no single diet standing out in effectiveness. This suggests that commonalities among approaches (e.g., diet quality, nutrient density, weight loss) may all be involved in modulating pain physiology   Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.  Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health! Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic! Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference.  Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. Website
Home
Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/ Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/ Twitter YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2 Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/ About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger   Bibliography 1. Harris KM, W.S., Gaskin DJ,, High and Rising Working-Age Mortality in the US: A Report From the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. JAMA, 2021. 2. Rowena Field, M.P., Fereshteh Pourkazemi, PhD, Jessica Turton, Kieron Rooney PhD,, Dietary Interventions Are Beneficial for Patients with Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis. Pain Med, 2020. 22(3): p. 694-714.

Nutrition for Pain, CBT for Pain, TMJ, & 2020 Deaths

 CF 173: Nutrition for Pain, CBT for Pain, TMJ, & 2020 Deaths

Today we’re going to talk a lot about pain. Nutrition for chronic pain, CBT and CFT for chronic pain, we’ll talk about TMJ treatment, and we’ll talk about deaths in 2020. This episode is full of info so let’s dive in. 

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

 

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #173

Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about useless research and we talked about insult vs. inflammation. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

I don’t know if I mentioned it or not but I got my book back from Dr. Chris Howson up in the Great State of North Dakota. He spent some time editing it. Dr. Howson is the inventor of the Drop Release tool and is just a super dude on top of being brilliant. If you don’t know about Drop Release, go check it out at https://droprelease.com. It’s pretty cool and something you can use to speed up soft tissue work in your practice. 

Now that we have gone through that process, I am teaching myself the way to self-publish this dude. When there are so many options, it can be daunting. It’s hard to know exactly where to go and how to do it. 

So that is the process I’m undergoing currently. Fortunately, I just noticed a colleague of mine that has recently published a book and it’s #1 on Amazon in its category. I reached out to her and she gave me a path to follow. So down the path I go. 

Still working on the medical integration here at the office. I’ve been having weekly calls with the integration consultant we are using. We are using Dr. Tyce Hergert down in Southlake, TX who has been integrated for 5-6 years at this point. Maybe even longer. He’s been through it for sure. If you are going through integration and need a little guidance, email me at [email protected] and I’ll get you in touch with Dr. Hergert. 

Our attorney and CPA group got together and got it all figured out so we are moving forward with that aspect of it. Now, if we can just get that Nurse Practitioner hired. I made a mistake that could be seen as misleading. On the Indeed ad I placed, I put the wage at $65/hr. What wasn’t in the ad because there wasn’t a place for it, is that we have only about 33 hrs of hands on time per week. We are starting our NP off at around $85-$90k per year. 

I think one of the NPs got PO’d at me because I was absolutely hiring her. No doubt. She was the one. When it came down to it, she asked my the yearly salary. I told her and she said she wouldn’t and couldn’t do it for less than $125k/year. 

Well, damn. Back almost at square one on that end of things. I had made my mind up on her. Not only that, I think she was mad at me. Lol. So, I went and changed it to the yearly salary to make sure I wasn’t being misleading in any way. 

Now, the goal is to start at $85k and have them up to $120k within 3-4 years. But you can’t start something brand new at that level when you have no clue how it’s going to all work out and come together. It’s already a huge risk to start with. Why make any riskier from the get go?

So, that’s where all of that stands for now. Getting the book together, getting the medical entity rolling, and getting busy as hell again. Oh my gosh. It’s going to take a minute to get used to treating the numbers we were treating back before COVID came along. Today, as I found a little window to start typing today, I’ve got 56 on the schedule. That hasn’t happened since December of 2019. Maybe January of 2020. Maybe. 

February 2020 came along and destroyed business. BAM…..30% at least was gone. We went from 185-200 visits per week all the way down to 115 or so. It wasn’t awesome. I’m not going to lie. OK, it was awful actually. We paid the bills but nobody made any money. That’s for damn sure. 

Now, for the last 2-3 weeks, things are beginning to get a little crazy again. Thank goodness. I hope you are experiencing the resurgence I am experiencing. I think deep down, we all know it’s going to be OK but it’s sure refreshing to finally start to feel it and see it. 

Onto the research!

Item #1

The first one today is called “Do Nutritional Factors Interact with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain? A Systematic Review” by Elma et. al. [1] and published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine in March of 2020 and that’s only a little smoky but still hot enough!

Why They Did It

They say, “Dietary patterns may play an important role in musculoskeletal well-being. However, the link between dietary patterns, the components of patients’ diet, and chronic musculoskeletal pain remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to systematically review the literature on the link between dietary patterns, the components of patients’ diet and chronic musculoskeletal pain”

How They Did It

  • (PRISMA) guidelines were used
  • Online databases PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were used 
  • 20,316 articles screened and only 12 found eligible to be included in this review
  • They consisted of 9 experimental and 3 observational studies

What They Found

  • 7 out of 9 experimental studies showed a pain-relieving effect of dietary changes
  • Protein, fat, and sugar intake were found to be associated with pain intensity and pain threshold

Wrap It Up

In an interesting conclusion, the authors say, “Plant-based diets might have pain relieving effects on chronic musculoskeletal pain. Patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis pain can show inadequate intake of calcium, folate, zinc, magnesium, and vitamin B6, whilst patients with fibromyalgia can show a lower intake of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamin A-E-K, folate, selenium, and zinc. Chronic pain severity also shows a positive relation with fat and sugar intake in osteoarthritis, and pain threshold shows a positive association with protein intake in fibromyalgia.”

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #2

This second one is called “CBT and CFT for Chronic Pain” by Graham Hadley and Matthew Novitch [2] and published in Current Pain and Headache Reports on April 1, 2021. Dammit stand back, we got a hot one. 

Why They Did It

Chronic pain is a widespread public and physical health crisis, as it is one of the most common reasons adults seek medical care and accounts for the largest medical reason for disability in the USA. 

  • Chronic pain is associated with decreased functional status, opioid dependence and substance abuse disorders, mental health crises, and overall lower perceived quality of life. 
  • Evidence suggests that persistent low back pain (pLBP) is a multidimensional biopsychosocial problem with various contributing factors. Emotional distress, pain-related fear, and protective movement behaviors are all unhelpful lifestyle factors that previously were more likely to go unaddressed when assessing and treating patient discomfort….
  • and as we just covered, diet might play a part in it as well. 
  • Those that are not properly assisted with these psychosocial issues are often unlikely to benefit from treatment in the primary care setting and thus are referred to multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation physicians. 
  • This itself increases healthcare costs, and treatments can be invasive and have risks of their own. 
  • Therefore, less expensive and more accessible management strategies targeting these psychosocial issues should be started to facilitate improvement early. 
  • As a biopsychosocial disorder, chronic pain is influenced by a range of factors including lifestyle, mental health status, familial culture, and socioeconomic status. 
  • Physicians have moved toward multi-modal pain approaches in order to combat this public health dilemma, ranging from medications with several different mechanisms of action, lifestyle changes, procedural pain control, and psychological interventions. 
  • Part of the rehabilitation process now more and more commonly includes cognitive behavioral and cognitive functional therapy. 
  • Cognitive functional therapy (CFT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both multidimensional psychological approaches to combat the mental portion of difficult pain control. 
  • While these therapies are quite different in their approach, they lend to the idea that chronic pain can and should be targeted using coping mechanisms, helping patients understand the pathophysiological process of pain, and altering behavior.
  • CFT differs from CBT functionally, as instead of improving managing/coping mechanisms of pain control from a solely mental approach, CFT directly points out maladaptive behaviors and actively challenges the patient to change them in a cognitively integrated, progressive overloading functional manner
  • With a robust set of data, one can conclude that CBT and CFT are exceptional therapeutic methods in improving chronic pain or the overall well-being of our patients. 

Item #3

This one is called “The Leading Causes of Death in the US for 2020” by Ahmad et. al. [3] and published in JAMA on March 31, 2021 and that’s definitely some hot stuff right there. 

This is more of an article rather than research and it won’t take us long to hit the high points here. 

  • Provisional estimates indicate a 17.7% increase in the number of deaths in 2020 (the increase in the age-adjusted rate was 15.9%) compared with 2019, with increases in many leading causes of death.1 The provisional leading cause-of-death rankings for 2020 indicate that COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death in the US behind heart disease and cancer
  • Cause-of-death data are based on the underlying cause of death, which is the disease or condition responsible for initiating the chain of events leading to death.
  • The provisional number of deaths occurring in the US among US residents in 2020 was 3 358 814, an increase of 503 976 (17.7%) from 2019
  • COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death in 2020, with an estimated 345 323 deaths, and was largely responsible for the substantial increase in total deaths from 2019 to 2020.
  • Substantial increases from 2019 to 2020 also occurred for several other leading causes. Heart disease deaths increased by 4.8%, the largest increase in heart disease deaths since 2012

I know……I know….car wrecks were reported as COVID and all that. I know….you do you boo. 

Item #4

This last one is called “Manual therapy for temporomandibular disorders: A review of the literature” by Kalam ir et. al. [4] and published in Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies in January of 2007. Definitely not hot. 

Why They Did It

The contemporary biopsychosocial health paradigm emphasizes a reversible and conservative approach to chronic pain management. Manual therapy for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) claims to fulfil these criteria. An assessment of the utilization and efficacy of manual therapy for this condition is therefore required. 

How They Did It

  • A review of the literature pertaining to manual therapy for TMDs was undertaken between September and December 2005. Keywords used in the search were: TMD, manual therapy, massage, manipulation, mobilization, adjustment, chiropractic, osteopathy, physiotherapy, exercise.
  • A four member reviewer panel identified eight (n=8) randomized controlled trials of sufficiently reliable power to be suitable for inclusion in the review, of which only three included manipulative treatment of the temporomandibular joint. 

Wrap It Up

The results of manual therapy trials for this condition suggest that manual therapy is a viable and useful approach in the management of TMD. Manual therapy has also been shown to be more cost effective and less prone to side effects than dental treatment. 

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. Elma O, Y.S., Deliens T, Coppieters I,, Do Nutritional Factors Interact with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain? A Systematic Review. J Clin Med, 2020. 9(3): p. 702.

2. Hadley G, N.M., CBT and CFT for Chronic Pain. Current Pain Headache Reports, 2021. 25(35).

3. Ahmad F, A.R., The Leading Cause of Death in the US for 2020. JAMA, 2021.

4. Kalamir A, P.H., Vitiello A,, Manual therapy for temporomandibular disorders: A review of the literature. J Bodyw Mov Ther, 2007. 11(1): p. 84-90.

CF 062: Chiropractic Prevalence, JAMA’s Awful Info on Opioids, & New Info on Screen Time

CF 062: Chiropractic Prevalence, JAMA’s Awful Info on Opioids, & New Info on Screen Time

Today we’re going to talk about chiropractic prevalence, a new article in JAMA with some pretty terrible projections for opioid use and deaths, and new information on kiddos and the time they spend on screens. 

But first, here’s that bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based productsIntegrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have collapsed into Episode #62

Introduction

We’re here to advocate for chiropractic and to give you some awesome information to make your life easier from day-to-day. We’re going to keep you from wasting time through your week by giving you confidence in your recommendations and in your treatments. This is something I feel confident in guaranteeing you if you listen and stick to it here at the Chiropractic Forward Podcast.  

Evidence-Based Chiropractic Store

Part of saving you time and effort is having the right patient education tools in your office. Tools that educate based on solid, researched information. We offer you that. It’s done for you. We are taking pre-orders right now for our brand new, evidence-based office brochures available at chiropracticforward.com. Just click the STORE link at the top right of the home page and you’ll be off and running. 

DACO

Let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. Man, this is how it goes with the DACO: just yesterday morning, I had a patient come in, mid-’60s and literally everything hurt. Restless leg syndrome was her main complaint but her GP just yesterday already started her on Vitamin D and iron supplements so she’s going in the right direction there. I have heard of acupuncture being good for it as well but have not seen any research on that so can’t make that claim. 

Anyhooo…literally everything hurt, couldn’t sit down and basically, a general overall look of being unwell for a lack of a better word. She just didn’t look healthy. I started asking her about bone scans and she’d never had one. Well, this guy just gets feelings and when I get a feeling, they get sent out. I sent her out for a bone scan. 

No kidding, that afternoon I sit down for a class. The next one up? Yep, diagnosing osteoporosis. Lol. Wouldn’t you know it? Anyway, had I had this class before the encounter with the new patient, I might not have sent her. I’m not sure.

But, it’s just funny how in tune with clinical practice the classes really are. Also, as a consequence of the class, I have a quick sheet made up that changes the way I deal with potential osteoporosis patients from here on out. Forever and ever amen. 

Personal Happenings

So far, not a lot of blowback on my recent episode covering my thoughts on faith-based practices. Sometimes I’m mouthy, right? I get it. Who the hell cares what I have to say? I don’t know who cares honestly. Lol. But, we’re growing and growing so at least some of you identify with my way of thinking.

I’m religious and I think that’s what makes me feel that I can be credible in critiquing certain things in regard to religion. I just have a hard time with management companies coaching their impressionable doctors how to use the bible to manipulate scared patients looking for answers. When I think about it, it makes my pee hot. 

Anyway, it turns out that you guys agree with me and that makes me like you even more. Before you know it, we’re all going to be besties and share milkshakes with two straws and all of that mumbo jumbo. 

I’m glad you’re here with me today as we dive into the information I have for you this week. Here we go. 

Item #1

I want to start with one that had some conclusions I found surprising and somewhat encouraging……sort of. This new paper from The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine published January 18, 2019, and authored by Stephanie Taylor, Patricia Herman, Nell Marshall, and colleagues called “Use of Complementary and Integrated Health: A Retrospective Analysis of US Veterans with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Nationally[1].”

Due to time constraints on me, I didn’t go beyond the abstract here so….freaking sue me. I’ll have it cited in the show notes at chiropracticforward.com so you can go get it and dive in you over-over-achiever you with all that time sitting around. Must be nice pal. 

Why They Did It

The authors say that little is known regarding the use of complementary and integrative health therapies for chronic pain in the VA system which is the nation’s largest integrated healthcare system. We will get into chiropractic prevalence briefly.

In my experience, I can echo this paper’s sentiment that the VA is at the forefront of the movement away from opioids and toward alternative healthcare. 

They researched this paper over 2 years for the use of 9 types of alternative therapies that included meditation, yoga, acupuncture, chiropractic, guided imagery, biofeedback, tai chi, massage, and hypnosis. 

What they found

27% of younger veterans with chronic musculoskeletal pain use alternative healthcare

The most used for was meditation at 15%. I found that surprising. Meditation means slowing down, sitting still, relaxing, and all that good stuff. In this day and age, I just have a hard time seeing that as the most prevalent form of alternative healthcare. 

We all think we’re so busy and, for us chiropractors, a lot of us really ARE too busy to stop and meditate. I may just be taking my own personal experience here and assuming everyone else on the planet is like me and, of course, that’s not true. Still, meditation was the most prevalent in this study. 

Yoga was next at 7%. Again, I guess I haven’t realized how popular yoga is getting these days but, I know the VA is pushing it so that may be playing a part in it. 

Coming in in 3rd place we have acupuncture. Once again, it’s surprising to me but, the VA is directing the recommendations and, in the real world, outside of the VA, acupuncture does not out-pace chiropractic. I do believe the VA is seeing it’s use for PTSD and chronic pain though and is responding appropriately. 

Finally, here comes Chiropractic care coasting in in 4th place for chiropractic prevalence.

Ugh. We know outside the enclosed ecosystem of the VA, chiropractic care is not less prevalent than yoga, meditation, and acupuncture. But, being within the VA, we know that medical doctors, PA’s, and nurse practitioners are making these recommendations and referrals so we still clearly have a lot of work to do. We are still a world away from where we need to be in regard to chiropractic prevalence,

You know what else that means though right? There are incredible potential and opportunity. If the VA is an example of the rest of the allopathic world, we could say that even fewer than 5% of chronics get referred to us from the GPs and orthopedic surgeons. I think that’s fair because most of them are unaware of Dr. Christine Goertz’s work that was published in JAMA not long ago.

If you’re unfamiliar with that, go listen to Episode 25 of this podcast. In short, she showed how veterans with chiropractic care mixed in with their traditional care had better outcomes. That’s when we started seeing the referrals from the VA

Also, you’ll notice that all of the nine therapies tracked here were on the list of first-line therapies that came from the updated recommendations by the American College of Physicians in February of 2016[2]. 

I guess my point on the paper here is that the medical world, or at least the VA part of it, is paying attention to research regardless of whether it goes against their previously held biases. They are absolutely trying to reverse the opioid epidemic. And we have a lot of work to do to gain that trust and get those referrals. When they’re recommending meditation before chiropractic care for chronic pain, then there is a ton of room for us to shine. So go shine it up all you shiny happy people out there. 

Item #2

On to item numero dos, number 2 for our non-Spanish speaking population out there. This one is discouraging and…..well….awful if I’m being honest.

This one is from JAMA called “Prevention of Prescription Opioids Misuse and Projected Overdose Deaths in the United States” published on February 1, 2019, and authored by Quiushi Chen, Marc Larochelle, David Weaver, and colleagues[3].

Why They Did It

In JAMA, they always start with the question being answered here. The authors wanted to answer this one: “what is the projected effect of lowering incident non-medical prescription opioid use on the future trajectory of the opioid overdose crisis in the USA?

I’m just going to cut to the chase on it and leave a bunch of details out. Here’s why. I don’t want us getting bogged down in the details and methods and all that stuff.

I want you to be able to retain just a few numbers and not be distracted by the rest of the minutiae. You like that word? I know you do. Minutiae, You say that to the right fellow nerd and you may just get you a date, people.

It’s a powerful word so take it, use it, enjoy it. I swear I’m undiagnosed ADHD. I swear it. 

Anyway, here’s the deal, although we as a nation, as a world, now see the issues with opioids and are now trying to address the issue, It’s not getting better and it won’t get any better according to this paper. 

Check it out, according to this paper, the annual number of opioid overdose deaths is projected to increase from 33,100 in 2015…..then we know that 72,000 died in 2017….all the way up to 81,700 deaths projected 2025. 

They are projecting from 2016-2025 to lose a total of approximately 700,400 people to opioid deaths. They say about 80% of that will be due to illicit opioids. I don’t know how the hell they can tell that but that may be a little bit of, “yeah it’s happening but it’s not our fault,” BS going on there but who knows? In this paper, they’re assuming that the illegal use of opioids will increase from 61% in 2015 to 80% by 2025. I don’t know. Sounds like fuzzy math to me but I’m not a researcher. 

I think their numbers are fuzzy because we know 2015 saw about 36,000 die, but then 2016 saw around 63,000 die if I remember correctly. Then, 2017 saw 72,000 die. Are you seeing the graph there in your mind? It’s not only up and to the right on this deal, but its up and to the right like it’s climbing Mt. Everest. The numbers have harnesses fastened tightly and ropes and expert climbing guides and they’re going straight up the face like pros! 

These guys are guessing that by 2025, in 9 years, the deaths will only have increased a total of 9,000 per year, so….they’ll only increase an average of 1,000 deaths per year. Do you see why I think they’re crazy? The deaths increased by 9,000 just last year. Do you see what I’m saying? I’m not saying they’re wrong but….they’re wrong. Lol. 

They then say that across all interventions tested, further lowering the incidence of prescription opioid misuse from 2015 levels is projected to decrease overdose deaths by only 3%-5.3%. 

Their quoted conclusion is, “This study’s findings suggest that interventions targeting prescription opioid misuse such as prescription monitoring programs may have a modest effect, at best, on the number of opioid overdose deaths in the near future. Additional policy interventions are urgently needed to change the course of the epidemic.”

So what do we take from this exactly? Here’s my deal. On the surface at least it smells like a steaming pot of shoo shoo caca doody, 

Instead of recognizing the fact that unnecessary surgeries were many times the reason people got addicted in the first place, and that there are amazing opportunities outside the allopathic world to prevent those unnecessary and financially motivated surgeries, they say, “Hey look, a lot of this is done illegally and that’s just going to get worse and our part of this is really very small.

In fact, we can lower the prescriptions of opioids but it’s really not going to do a lot of good and, in fact, we think we should still be able to prescribe them as much as we are right now….blah blah blah poop coming out of the mouth and falling onto the floor with a splat. 

They are making guesses 9 years in the future what addict behaviors will be. I think that’s presumptuous and ultimately impossible. I just thought it was entertaining and that you all might enjoy this group trying to minimize responsibility or what role they can really play on decreasing opioid use.

I could totally be mischaracterizing this and they may have the best intentions in mind. While I trust my GP and I trust the friends of mine that are surgeons personally….I just don’t trust stuff like this. 

Obviously, I don’t agree with them but I’m a bumpkin chiro on the Texas Plains. I wouldn’t listen to me if I were them either. Lol. 

Item #3

OK, last item for this week and it’s something I’m admittedly fascinated with and I think that’s because I have a high schooler and a 5th grader and this stuff hits home any time I see it or read about it. 

This one was in JAMA too and called, “Association Between Screen Time and Children’s Performance on a Developmental Screening Test” written by Sheri Madigan, Dillon Browne, Nicole Racine and colleagues[4] published January 28, 2019. 

Why They Did It

The main question they were trying to answer was this, “Is increased screen time associated with poor performance on children’s developmental screening tests?” Basically, does screen time have a direct effect on child development?

They had 2,441 kiddos in it. A random-intercepts, cross-lagged panel model revealed that higher levels of screen time at 24 and 36 months were significantly associated with poorer performance on developmental screening tests at 36 months and 60 months. 

What They Found

Their conclusion was, “The results of this study support the directional association between screen time and child development. Recommendations include encouraging family media plans, as well as managing screen time, to offset the potential consequences of excess use.”

Yes, it’s easy to just hand them a device and hope they’re quiet long enough to get a nap in. Guilty as charged. Guilty as charged. 

But, turns out as we may have guessed if we really thought about it 8-9 years ago when all of this really started….this isn’t in their best interest in the long run. 

Chiropractic evidence-based productsIntegrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

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TuneIn

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. Taylor S, H.P., Marshal N,, Use of Complementary and Integrated Health: A Retrospective Analysis of U.S. Veterans with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Nationally. J Altern Complement Med, 2019. 25(1).

2. Qaseem A, Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med, 2017. 4(166): p. 514-530.

3. Chen Q, L.M., Weaver D,, Prevention of Prescription Opioid Misuse and Projected Overdose Deaths in the United States. JAMA Network Open, 2019. 2(2): p. e187621-e187621.

4. Madigan S, Association Between Screen Time and Children’s Performance on a Developmental Screening TestAssociation Between Screen Time and Child DevelopmentAssociation Between Screen Time and Child Development. JAMA Pediatrics, 2019.

CF 025: Vets With Low Back Pain. Usual Care + Chiropractic vs. Usual Care Alone

CF 027: WANTED – Safe, Nonpharmacological Means Of Treating Spinal Pain

CF 052: Chiropractic Forward Podcast Year One Review

 

 

 

CF 060: Medical Marketing & Integration Care Expectations

CF 060: Medical Marketing & Integration Care Expectations

Today we’re going to talk about medical marketing scoundrels and about what the multidisciplinary world expects of us chiropractors. 

But first, here’s that ‘goes down so smooth’ bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

And we’re back. .Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  We are honored you’re spending some time with us and we hope we give some entertainment and some value in return. 

Introduction

You have disco’ed your way into Episode #60 just like John Travolta in Saturday Night Live. Kids, go Google that. It was cool back then. You could walk down the street in a Staying Alive strut man. Travolta was the bee’s knees back then wasn’t he? From Mr. Kotter, to Grease, to Staying Alive. Then turned kookoo wacko on everyone. He got so open-minded that his brain fell out and went splat. 

Let’s talk a bit about the diplomate of the Academy of chiropractic orthopedists quickly. That’s also known as the DACO program that I’m currently going through. I’ve officially hit the halfway point for the online hours and only have one class left for the live hours which I’ll get in less than a month down in Austin. Basically, out of 300 hours, I have about 125 left and have just been serious about this thing since October. Recent classes have been A Neurological Approach to Scoliosis, and the Neck and a Sense of Well-Being. 

I feel like it’s scooting fairly quickly at this point. It’s funny to watch my staff when I’m performing an exam these days. They’re familiar with the way I do exams and have done them for years. Just about every week, including this week, I’m adding or taking away from what I normally do. They don’t really know how to handle it. Lol. These classes really do change what you do almost immediately. 

If I can help you get started and rocking and rolling on your DACO, shoot me an email at [email protected] and I’ll be glad to point you in the right direction. 

New Year

How’s your new year starting? By the time this episode goes live, we’ll have been in it for a little over a month. I have to say that I’m confused this year. This is typically our slowest time of year. But, it’s going a little crazy this year for whatever reason. I have literally had 35 new patients in the last two weeks. It’s all I can do to get this podcast written each week, to be honest, but I’m committed. 

I actually had to come in on a Saturday to record the last episode because I just didn’t have the time available during the week to get it done. I’m not trying to brag. I think if you have a good staff, which I do, and you have them spaced appropriately, which I do, you can make your way through them while giving them the best care possible. Especially when you’re using post-graduate educations like the DACO to guide your exam and diagnosis. 

Crazy Busy

And, 35 new patients for my practice looks different than it may in a lot of clinics. I don’t see how many times we can run them through the doors. I don’t convince them their lives are at stake if they don’t see me 50 times this year. 

I used ChiroUp for all of my patients which I highly recommend. An additional $150/month seems like a lot. I know. But this programs is worth even more than that and they’re not paying me anything at all to say that. One of the things it does is track your patients through follow up emails. 

That’s how I know my case average, which is the number of times I typically see a person, stands at around 8 times while their national average stands at about 7 times. 

I know that my average improvement rating is 79.43% for ALL cases and that included everything from cervical radiculopathy and lumbar stenosis to cervicogenic headache and greater trochanteric bursitis. Their national average for improvement is 71.8% so I’m doing good there. If I’m getting 80% of my patients well, I’m happy. 

They have also tracked me at having a 98.6% likely to refer from my patients. Meaning, our patients are 98% happy to refer us to their family and friends and that makes me feel warm and fuzzy inside. I’d still like to know what I can do to make that other 1.4% happy but I think some people cannot be made happy at all. 

Even if you get them well and gave them free ice cream. They’d still gripe because the ice cream didn’t have chocolate syrup on it. You know those people. You know who I’m talking about, don’t you?

Anyway, the point was….I hope your 2019 has started off like my 2019. If it sustains, I’m going to have to get me some help in here! Including a nurse practitioner. Ahhhhh, the day I finally make that leap I may have a few hundred beers. Lol. 

Paper #1

The first item of research I want to get to is on medical marketing. Why do we care what the medical field is doing for marketing? Well, because they’re the main stakeholders in healthcare and it’s important to know what they’re doing. Either we can copy it or we can go 180 degrees from it depending on what we’re talking about. 

This paper we’ll talk about was in the Journal of the American Medical Association also known as JAMA on January 1, 2019, so it’s hot off of the press. It is called “Medical Marketing in the United States, 1997-2016” and was written by Lisa Schwartz, MD and Steven Woloshin, MD[1].  Please remember, if you’d like to see the paper, the methods, and that good hulabaloo….I always cite the papers at the end of the show notes over at chiropracticforward.com. This show is episode 60 just so’s you’s knows. 

Why They Did It

They wanted to answer the question, “How has the marketing of prescription drugs, disease awareness, health services, and laboratory tests in the United States changed from 1997 through 2016?” I think that’s a great question. 

Let’s find out, shall we? I say hell yes we shall!

As far as medical marketing goes, they say, “From 1997 through 2016, medical marketing expanded substantially, and spending increased from $17.7 to $29.9 billion, with direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription drugs and health services accounting for the most rapid growth, and pharmaceutical marketing to health professionals accounting for most promotional spending.”

Let’s dial down into that just a bit. 

As you are probably already guessing because you see this trash on TV every time you turn it on but the most rapid, crazy increase in medical marketing advertising was in the direct-to-consumer advertising. It went from $2.1 billion in 1997, which was 11.9% of the total marketing….it went from $2.1 billion all the way up to $9.6 billion and now, marketing meds directly to the consumer now make up 32% of the total spending. I say NOW….that was 2016’s numbers. Probably worse now.

They broke it down even further and highlighted the prescriptions that are marketed directly. The drugs you need a prescription for ….ads for them went from $1.3 billion in ’97 which was 79,000 ads, all the way up to $6 billion dollars and 663,000 ads in 2016. 

All I have to say here is, “Dayum.”

Then, I’m not done yet….hold my beer and watch this….Lol. That’s what I feel like here. Then, they say that medical marketing straight to healthcare providers like the MDs, DOs, etc….that marketing went up from $15.6 billion to 20.3 billion in 2016 but here’s what’s crazy when you think about it, folks, $13.5 billion of that was for free samples….OK, whatever. Then $979 million went to payments to physicians for speaking fees, meals, and things like that that were related to specific products. So they paid almost a billion damn dollars to MDs to go around medical marketing & touting their drugs.  

It’s insane. You cannot tell me no way no how that with that much money in the hopper, that we don’t have some nefarious skunky smelly dirty crap snaking around and messing with people for the worse. You can’t convince me of it and I’m not a conspiracy guy either. 

Like, when they say we didn’t land on the moon, it was shot in a studio in Hollywood? Yeah, they need a kick in the nuggets. Really? The Earth is flat? Are you sure? I’ve seen a lot of pics from outers space and round is what I’m getting people!! 

You see what I mean here but I also know people and I know what greed does to people. It’s insane, honestly. 

Pharmaceutical Commercials

Let’s talk about those medical marketing commercials for a minute. Let’s make up a name that sounds a little like a prescription. How about Killyametrix? Yeah, sounds good. OK, here’s how it usually goes, “Have you been having a hard time getting into your life? Are you just tired? No energy, no drive, no ambition anymore? Wouldn’t you like to have more energy? You’re too young for this. Killyametrix has been shown to increase energy and get patients back to enjoying their lives quicker and faster than any medication in the history of man that was ever made. There are some side effects. You’ll want to talk to your doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms: gout, liver failure, tumors coming out of your eyeballs, if your foot falls right off in mid-stride, high blood pressure, going cross-eyed, bleeding from the ears and fingernails, if your hair curls, if all of your hair falls out, or if your knee cap pops right off as you sit down and shoots straight across the room knocking someone out. Other than those issues, it’s a great drug. Try Killyametrix. Ask your doctor about Killyametrix and if it might be right for you.”

Here’s the deal, when I was growing up, did you realize whiskey, bourbon, scotch, …..the hard stuff…..it was never advertised on TV because they knew it was damaging to the population so why promote it nationally. I believe it was actually illegal to advertise the hard stuff but I’m not 100% on that. 

But, now, or at least in 2016, it’s OK to advertise prescription drugs straight to the consumer to the tune of 663,000 ads at a cost of $6 billion dollars. It’s lunacy. 

How about you go to your doctor with no preconceived idea of what’s wrong with you and he or she plays doctor, figures out what’s going on with you, and the DOCTOR, the actual doctor, decides what medication you need if any at all. 

Why don’t we try that crap out in America for a change? 

If I were an MD or DO, I’d be livid every time I saw one of those stupid commercials on TV. Hell, I’m a DC and I’m livid when I see them. 

Make me a crazy person. Makes me want to go live in a rubber room for a couple of weeks to decompress.

Paper #2

Let’s get to the last thing here. This one is called “Stakeholder expectations from the integration of chiropractic care into a rehabilitation setting: a qualitative study” by Zacariah Shannon, et. al[2]. published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine in December 2018. 

Why They Did It

They say that few studies exist on what the expectations of chiropractic care really are within a multidisciplinary setting so they wanted to add to the literature on this topic. 

What They Found

They found that expectations for the chiropractic program in this study were mostly positive. Good news. The idea of the patients making progress was the overriding theme for the group. They expected the addition of chiropractic to help patients progress by improving pain management and physical functioning. 

In addition, they also expected indirect effects of chiropractic on healthcare integration. Things like increasing the patient participation in other providers’ treatments which would lead to improved care for the patient across the board. 

I wonder if those other providers were or will be helping increase the chiropractor’s load as well? That’s a good question to ask. 

Wrap It Up

They summed it up by saying, “Stakeholders expected the addition of chiropractic care to a rehabilitation specialty hospital to benefit patients through pain management and functional improvements leading to whole person healing. They also expected chiropractic to benefit the healthcare team by facilitating other therapies in pursuit of the hospital mission, that is, moving patients towards discharge.”

Not bad, not bad. It’s a helluva lot better than we had going on for us before the opioid crisis. I’ll give them that. I think the only part of this I really don’t like is their expectation of the chiropractor helping feed the rest of them while, in my biased opinion, they should be feeding the chiropractor first in an effort to keep people off of meds. 

Their stated goals are pain management and physical function. Well…that’s sort of right in our wheelhouse so why wouldn’t we be getting those first? I think the stakeholders have been fed quite enough. They’re fat as hell and slobbering. 

Bring the evidence-informed chiropractors in and watch your patients shine with happiness, leave amazing reviews, and go out and tell your city about all of the good things your clinic is doing. 

If they get the right evidence-based chiropractor in there, that’s the way I see it playing out because the research we covered several weeks ago shows us that chiropractors have the highest patient outcome satisfaction when compared to MD and DO’s, in fact, we wipe the floor with those people in regard to musculoskeletal issues. Not only that but we beat out the PTs as well on outcome measures. 

But we should feed them, right? They should be thankful to have us. 

Integrating Chiropractors The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out.

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. Schwartz L, W.S., Medical Marketing in the United States, 1997-2016. JAMA, 2019. 321(1): p. 80-96.

2. Shannon Z, S.S., , Gosselin D, Vining R,, Stakeholder expectations from the integration of chiropractic care into a rehabilitation setting: a qualitative study. BMC Comp Altern Med, 2018. 18(316).

 

https://www.chiropracticforward.com/cf-025-vets-with-low-back-pain-usual-care-chiropractic-vs-usual-care-alone/

https://www.chiropracticforward.com/cf-032-how-evidence-based-chiropractic-can-help-save-the-day/

 

CF 027: WANTED – Safe, Nonpharmacological Means Of Treating Spinal Pain

 

 

CF 059: Don’t Be Dumb on Cervicogenic Headache

CF 059: Don’t Be Dumb on Cervicogenic Headache

Today we’re going to talk about headaches. More specifically, we’re going to talk about cervicogenic headaches. How can we recognize cervicogenic headache, and get better at diagnosing and treating cervicogenic headache?

But first, here’s that delicious bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have crashed into Episode #59 like a bull in a china cabinet. You know, I’ve been told before that I’m a little like a bull in a china cabinet. That what I don’t break I poo on. Was that more palatable than some of the other words I could have used? I certainly hope so because me saying it that way just doesn’t sound very Jeff-like but I try to keep it mostly high brow and not too profanity-laced. 

DACO

As always, let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. I decided I kind of dread the eLearning episodes. Although the information is excellent, I’m one of those that doesn’t want to miss a word in the notes. These can be somewhat complex topics and, I’m afraid that if I miss something, it’ll be important and I’ll have trouble making sense of it all when I re-visit it. 

That could be my undiagnosed anxiety issue at play. Who the hell knows but it’s a fact so that means that I have to transcribe the entire 20-40 minutes of video or I’m not happy with the final result of the class. There are notes on these classes. A worksheet that helps organize it all but, there is a lot on the videos that is not on the worksheet so transcribe I must and I’m starting to despise that process. 

It’s admittedly a quirk of mine and probably won’t be your experience on the deal if you give it a try. As a result, I have started combining the Communication Drills. So I’ll take an eLearning episode and then I’ll take a Communication Drill and basically alternate them to keep me from getting burned out and to keep me moving forward efficiently. I’m averaging 8 or so hours a week so we’re still clicking along like a tired locomotive. 

Recent classes have been Managing Migraine Headaches, Diagnosing Cervicogenic Headaches, A Neurological Approach to Scoliosis, and Thinking Laterally With The Disc Patient. 

Coming Up

I gotta tell you, you all really liked the episode we did with Dr. James Lehman, episode 55, and the one we did on what I despise about this profession, episode 56. We are up over 7,200 downloads and that’s pretty exciting Y’all. This little thing of ours is rocking and rolling and shows no signs of slowing down either. 

That’s because THE Dr. Christine Goertz is coming on the show in late February. Wow! That’s a biggie! I’m going to let you in on a little secret. You’d already know this if you were in our private Chiropractic Forward Group on Facebook. You would have even had the chance to suggest questions for me to ask her when she comes on the show. You should probably go ahead and become a member. 

Speaking of the episode where we talked about the magical disappearing osteophytes, I was a little worried if I’m being honest about that one. I hated being negative like that and I was a bit concerned some of you would have a problem with that. Oh contrare, I think I had more feedback on that one than any of our episodes. 

It appears you guys agree and there is indeed no room for that mystical hunk o junk in our great profession. Of course, there isn’t. We knew that. Sometimes you just have to blow off a little steam and be the old guy saying, “get off my lawn ya punks!”

That was episode 56 for me. “Get off my lawn and stop driving so fast in a 30 mph zone yeah steampunk loving jackasses! And quit looking at my daughter like that before I shoot you in the nose hole!” We’re in Texas and all. lol. 

Cervicogenic Headache

Alright, let’s tackle cervicogenic headache a bit here. The first thing I want to say here is that, prior to the DACO classes, I had assumed that cervicogenic headache had a much higher prevalence than it does in reality. In your clinic, it really doesn’t show up all that much compared to the other forms of headaches. 

Breaking that down a little, tension-type headaches are the most prevalent at 38% of cases, migraines are next at 10%, and cervicogenic headache brings up the rear-end of the group at about 4% of cases. 

If it only makes up 4% of cases, why the heck are we covering it this week you may ask. Well, let me answer that since you’re so damn inquisitive today. 

Because it still makes up your patient base, you need to be able to notice it, and it’s one of the forms we can be fairly effective in treating. 

The first thing we gotta do is rule out a pathological headache by testing 

  • Steady gait over a normal base
  • Normal vital signs
  • Normal Romberg’s test
  • Quick screen of cranial nerves looking for extra-ocular movements, nystagmus, symmetrical pupils with normal reaction to light, normal facial muscle tone, and things like that. 
  • And then a basic screen of tendon reflexes, motor power and pathological reflexes like Babinski’s and Hoffman reflexes

 

What Does It Look Like?

So, what does a cervicogenic headache typically look like? Well, the first thing is that it is technically a secondary headache which means it is the symptom of something else that’s going on. 

Cervicogenic headache is usually 

  • Unilateral, side-consistent pain referred from a source in the neck. In fact, many times, you can elicit the head pain by pressing on the facets of the C2/3 region. 
  • Usually, the pain starts in the upper cervical region and then spreads toward the front of the head, orbital region, temples, vertex, or ears.
  • The pain may also spread to the ipsilateral shoulder or arm
  • Also, the pain is precipitated or aggravated by special neck movements or sustained neck posture. 
  • It’s mostly in the adult population with females being four times more affected than men. 
  • Sufferers can have suboccipital neck pain, dizziness, and even lightheadedness 

Paper #1

Let’s look at this paper called “Cervical musculoskeletal impairment in frequent intermittent headache. Part 1: subjects with single headaches” authored by G. Jull and published in 2007 in the International Headache Society[1]. 

They were testing musculoskeletal function in headache types like tension-type, migraine, and cervicogenic.

In all but one measure (kinesthetic sense), the cervicogenic headache group were significantly different from the migraine, tension-type headache and control groups. 

They found that collectively, restricted movement, in association with palpable upper cervical joint dysfunction and impairment in the cranio-cervical flexion test, had 100% sensitivity and 94% specificity to identify cervicogenic headache. 

They found that collectively, restricted movement, in association with palpable upper cervical joint dysfunction and impairment in the cranio-cervical flexion test, had 100% sensitivity and 94% specificity to identify cervicogenic headache.

It doesn’t get much more sensitive and specific than that does it? 100% and 94%. Bam, you got a cervicogenic headache Patient Jones and I have pretty much zero doubt about that. Yes…that feels good to be that confident. 

Paper #2

This next paper is called “Upper cervical and upper thoracic manipulation vs. mobilization and exercise in patients with cervicogenic headache: a multi-center randomized clinical trial[2].” It was authored by James Dunning, and what looks like about 30 others and published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders in 2016. 

In the beginning here the authors say that no studies have directly compared the effectiveness of cervical and thoracic manipulation to mobilization and exercise in individuals with cervicogenic headache. Thus the reason for the study. 

They had 110 participants here that were randomized to receive both cervical and thoracic manipulation or mobilization and exercise. 

What They Found

“Six to eight sessions of upper cervical and upper thoracic manipulation were shown to be more effective than mobilization and exercise in patients with CH, and the effects were maintained at 3 months.”

Time for superhero sound effects….Bam, snap, pow, shazam!

One of these days, I’m really going to incorporate sound effects into my efforts here but until then, you’re stuck with my ridiculous superhero effects. Lol. 

Paper #3

Moving on, this next paper is called “Dose-response for chiropractic care of chronic cervicogenic headache and associated neck pain: a randomized pilot study.” It was authored by M Haas, et. al. and published in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics[3]. 

Why They Did It

To acquire information for designing a large clinical trial and determining its feasibility and to make preliminary estimates of the relationship between headache outcomes and the number of visits to a chiropractor.

What They Found

There was substantial benefit in pain relief for 9 and 12 treatments compared with 3 visits.

The authors concluded, “A large clinical trial on the relationship between pain relief and the number of chiropractic treatments is feasible. Findings give preliminary support for the benefit of larger doses, 9 to 12 treatments, of chiropractic care for the treatment of cervicogenic headache.”

Paper #4

Roughly that same group led by M.  Haas, et. al. later published this one in 2018, just last year, called “Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial.” It was published in Spine Journal[4]. 

They were looking to settle in on the optimal number of visits for the care of cervicogenic headache with spinal manipulative therapy. 

It was a two-site, open-open-table randomized controlled trial with 256 participants. 

What They Found

There was a linear dose-response relationship between spinal manipulative therapy visits and days with cervicogenic headache. For the highest and most effective dose of 18 treatments, days suffering from cervicogenic headache were reduced by half and about 3 more days per month than for the light-massage control group. 

And there you have it people, more information than you probably expected to get on Cervicogenic headache today. 

This week, I want you to go forward knowing more about cervicogenic headache than you did before you listened to this podcast. I want you to see it, test for it, recognize it, and fix it!

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out.

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. Jull G, Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairment in Frequent Intermittent Headache. Part 1: Subjects With Single Headaches. International Headache Society, 2007. 27(7).

2. J, D., Upper cervical and upper thoracic manipulation versus mobilization and exercise in patients with cervicogenic headache: a multi-center randomized clinical trial. BMC Musculoskelet Disord, 2016. 17(1): p. 1.

3. Haas M, Conservative physical therapy management for the treatment of cervicogenic headache: a systematic review. J Man Manip Ther, 2013. 21(2): p. 113-24.

4. Haas M, Dose-response and efficacy of spinal manipulation for care of cervicogenic headache: a dual-center randomized controlled trial. Spine, 2018: p. S1529-9430.

CF 006: With Dr. Tyce Hergert: Astounding Expert Information On Immediate Headache Relief

CF 050: Chiropractic Care – Text Neck, Headaches, Migraines

CF 041: w/ Dr. William Lawson – Research For Neck Pain

 

 

CF 054: Lumbar Fusion Surgery and Its Evidence Or Lack Of

CF 054: Lumbar Fusion Surgery and Its Evidence Or Lack Of

Today we’re going to talk about a great new paper coming to us from Internal Medicine Journal on Lumbar fusion surgery and it’s evidence or lack of. What’s the word on lumbar fusion surgery? We’ll tell you.

But first, here’s that silky smooth Chiropractic Forward bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have glided all fast and furiously into Episode #54 and we’re happy to have you here smokin tires and all. Kill the engine and take a chill pill, won’t you?

DACO

Let’s talk a bit about the Diplomate of the Academy of Chiropractic Orthopedics program quickly. I’m sitting at around 76 of my online hours and I have to get 250 of those. Yes, if you were wondering, it is going by slowly here lately but I’m going to have a little time this week and weekend to put the pedal to the metal and get after it. 

Some classes from this past week were migraines, migraines in children, thoracolumbar junction difficulties, and chronically injured hamstrings. 

Spelling Issues

These courses come from a group in Australia and they really take the long road when it comes to spelling. Did you guys know that? The first thing that’s crazy about the Aussies is that they use esses instead of z’s. For example, recognize is spelled with an s rather than a “z”.

When you see the word orthopedic spelled orthopaedic, it’s because of them and the English. We take the shortcuts and say, hey, recognize has a z sound in it so let’s spell it with a z. Hey, orthopedic has an e sound in the middle of it so let’s drop the dumb a since we don’t need it and let’s just spell it orthopedic. 

Here’s another one. Behavior. These goofy people spell it behaviour. They snuck in au right there at the very end of the word like they thought they were going to get away with it or something. Uh uh. Nope. We Americans don’t need the u at the end so we just end it in or. Because we’re cool and ain’t nobody got time for that crap. 

The most annoying one is probably edema or estrogen. They start both of those words with an O. Who the hell would ever spell estrogen Oestrogen? Or edema spelled oedema? That’s absolutely uncalled for and I’d appreciate them re-evaluating their use of the English language in this manner. 

Absolute ridiculosity. 

I am currently designing some really cool stuff all based in research and current evidence that I think you will all be interested in. At least I hope you are because, from what I’ve seen in researching, it’s like nothing else out there. 

Go to chiropracticforward.com right now while you’re thinking about it, just under this week’s episode, you’ll see an area where you can sign up for the newsletter. It’s only once a week and it’ll help us tell you about what we’re working on when we get it ready to go live!!

Now, let’s get to the reason for the season here. 

The is titled “Lumbar Spine Fusion: What Is The Evidence(Harris I 2018)?” and it was written by Ian Harris, Adrian Traeger, Ralph Stanford, Christopher Maher, and Rachelle Buchbinder. I recognize at least two of these names from the low back pain series published in The Lancet earlier this year. 

If you have not been through those papers, please listen to episodes #16, 17, and 18 of this Chiropractic Forward podcast for all the info you need on that. 

Basically, in this paper, they say that lumbar spinal fusion is common and associated with high cost and a risk of serious adverse events. They state that they aim to summarize systematic reviews on the effectiveness of lumbar spine fusion for most diagnoses. 

Of important note is where they say that they found NO high-quality systematic reviews and the risk of bias of the randomized controlled trials they found was generally high. For something as serious as lumbar fusion surgery. Where they cut into the body, take two vertebrae that usually aren’t unstable on each other, and then drive screws into them and affix hardware to fuse them together forever and ever amen. 

No high-quality systematic reviews for lumbar fusion surgery and the RCTs out there generally carry a high risk of bias. Great. Duly noted. Awesome. Lumbar fusion surgery

They go on to say that the available evidence doesn’t support a clinical benefit from lumbar fusion surgery compared to non-operative treatment or stabilization without fusion for thoracolumbar burst fractures. 

They say that surgical intervention for metastatic carcinoma of the spine associated with spinal cord compromise improves mobility and neurological outcome. That was based on a single trial. 

That was the high points of the abstract but let’s move in a little more and get on the micro level of this thing. 

This study takes info from Australia and, in the land down under, lumbar spine fusion is the fourth most costly surgical procedure, behind knee replacement, hip replacement, and C-sections. For a procedure with no high-quality systemic reviews. The first word that comes to mind for me here is, “Damn.”

The most common reasons used for lumbar spine fusion procedures would be intervertebral disc disease (which nearly everyone beyond 50-60yrs old has), degenerative scoliosis, and spinal canal stenosis. 

The main purpose here was to compare lumbar spinal fusion to non-operative means. Not to compare it to other surgical procedures. 

Conclusion

As part of the conclusion, the authors say, “The available evidence does not support the hypothesis that lumbar fusion surgery confers a clinical benefit compared to non‐operative alternatives for low back pain associated with degeneration. Similarly, the available evidence does not support the hypothesis that spine fusion confers a clinical benefit compared to non‐operative treatment or stabilization without fusion for thoracolumbar burst fractures. 

Benefits of lumbar fusion surgery compared to non‐operative treatment for isthmic spondylolisthesis are unclear (one trial at high risk of bias). Surgical intervention for metastatic carcinoma of the spine associated with spinal cord compromise improves mobility and neurological outcome (based on a single trial).

Ideally, lumbar fusion surgery for spondylolisthesis, burst fractures, back pain or degenerative conditions (degenerative scoliosis, spinal stenosis, recurrent disc herniation or instability), should only be performed in the context of high-quality clinical trials until the true value for each of these conditions is established. 

Until better quality evidence is available, treatment will continue to be guided by expert clinical opinion based on evidence at high risk of bias. Patients contemplating lumbar fusion surgery should be fully informed about the evidence base for their particular problem, including the relative potential benefits and harms of fusion compared with non‐operative treatments.

When Surgery Is OK

Let’s transition from that to an excellent guideline called When Surgery is OK and this comes from the legendary Dr. Stu McGill. 

To keep this episode from getting too long and out of hand, let’s hit the highlights. This is a 3-page document so we’ll shorten it to the extent that makes sense while still squeezing the good stuff out of it. Use these thoughts and ideas when deciding if surgery is indicated. 

Stu says to try the virtual surgery game and consider surgery only when it fails. Meaning pretend you had surgery today and tomorrow is the first day of recovery. It is characterized by gentle movements and activities but mostly a forced day of rest. The days following a typical post-surgical progression involves restricted activity. If this helps, no surgery at this time. 

Consider surgery when neurological issues are substantial, such as loss of bowel and bladder control. Note: that does not include radiating symptoms like sciatica, peripheral numbness, atrophy, etc….

Consider surgery in cases of trauma. When structures are unstable and need to be stabilized. 

Consider surgery only when the pain has been unrelenting and severe for a substantial period of time. Pain can be a terrible and misleading reason to get surgery. 

Select the surgeon. Dr. McGill says everyone likes to state that they had the best surgeon. He has found that asking the nurses and physical therapists at the hospital which surgeon has the best results is a wise way to go. 

Discuss the pain with the surgeon. Ask what the pain generator is and if they can cut it out. IF there are several tissues involved, chances of success are getting worse. Also if there is damage at several levels. 

Clarify what the success rate is. What does success even mean in your case? Does that mean you survived or does it mean you did OK for a bit before relapsing into pain? You want long-term success to any and all other options available. 

Beware of new treatments. That one should really go without any further discussion. Don’t be a pioneer on the patient side of surgical procedures. 

Beware of disc replacement – Dr. McGill states in this paper that he has not seen a successful case as of the writing of the article. 

Always exhaust the conservative options – He says you may believe that since you tried physical therapy and it didn’t help that only surgery remains. It just may be that the exact therapy tried was not the right one for your specific condition. 

FREE MRI Review

Beware of institutes that offer to view medical images and, with no other information, advise patients on surgery. Pictures are not linked to pain. He argues that a thorough clinical assessment is absolutely essential. I want to butt in on this one. The laser institute and orthopedic surgeons are all over the commercials on TV with this one. 

I will take this time to admit because they’re doing these free MRI reviews, I’m offering the same in my region but here’s why. It’s evidently enticing or they would not offer it and I KNOW for a fact they have a higher-paid marketing department that has decided it is indeed effective. 

That’s one of the reasons I’m doing it but the real reason is because I know that the majority of these people, if they get a free MRI review at the osteopath or the laser spine institute, they’re very likely to be lined up for surgery whereas I, after a thorough exam, will be lining them up for conservative, non-invasive therapy and I can usually keep these people from surgery and useless shots. 

There’s a difference. My free MRI review is to prevent them from surgery. Their free MRI review, in my opinion, is to QUALIFY them for surgery. 

Wrap Up

In wrapping this article or paper up, Dr. McGill says the following, “Tissues in the back become irritated with repeated loading. Consider accidentally stuffing a toe or biting the lip repeatedly – eventually, the slightest touch causes pain. This is symptom magnification because the tissues are hypersensitized. Reduction of the hypersensitivity in the toe or lip only occurs following a substantial amount of time after the accidental stub or bite has stopped.”

Dr. McGill goes on to say, “For example, people with flexion bending intolerance of the spine may replicate this every time they rise from a chair. Correcting this movement fault, metaphorically taking the hits away, results in less sensitized tissues, an increased repertoire of pain-free tasks, and a return of motion. Motion returns once the pain goes away.”

Boom. Snap. Pow. Shazam. KaBAM!! Superhero abilities via the chiropractor and ZERO surgery. How clever. 

Opinion

I don’t care what your chiropractic practice looks like. OK….I lie. As long as it doesn’t make mine look hokey or bad, then I don’t care what your practice looks like. Some are geared toward getting people out of pain. Some are geared to some wellness protocol. Some are floundering because they don’t know where they belong or exactly what they’re trying to accomplish. 

I’ll admit that, at one point in time, I was one of them. 

But, one common thread through all sorts of practices is this, we keep people from surgery. Maybe not 100% of the time but we do a hell of a job with the tools we’ve been given and I love the direction that opioids and lumbar fusion surgery failures are pushing our profession. 

Sometimes even in spite of ourselves. 

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out.

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

Harris I, T. A., Stanford R, (2018). “Lumbar spine fusion: what is the evidence?” Internal Med J.

 

 

CF 024: They Laughed When I Said I Could Still Help After Back Surgery

CF 020: Chiropractic Evolution or Extinction?

 

 

 

CF 051: Necks, Integrity of the Cervical Spine, and the CDC on Opioids

CF 051: Necks, Integrity of the Cervical Spine, and the CDC on Opioids

Today we’re going to talk about the reliability of clinical tests assessing the cervical spine, what is happening when adjusting a neck as far as the integrity of the cervical spine, and what the CDC says about opioids. It’s all fascinating all the time here at the Chiropractic Forward Podcast 

But first, here’s that bumper music

Integrating Chiropractors

OK, we are back. Welcome to the podcast today, I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

You have drifted all slow and gently into Episode #51

DACO

As has become the tradition, let’s talk a bit about the DACO program. DACO stands for Diplomate of American Chiropractic Orthopedist. Trudging along. I’m up to I believe 84 of the required 300. Classes this last week were on frozen shoulder, piriformis syndrome, Important aspects of lumbar MRI, and inguinal pain. 

This stuff is just invaluable, folks. I’m an organizational freak but at the end of each course, I’ll make myself a quick sheet that I can reference when something like that comes through the door. I think making these little quick sheets will really help to get some of the more rare or difficult cases figured out quickly. 

I’ve already put the lumbar differential diagnosis sheet to use a few times as well as the dizziness quick sheet I created. I have shared several times here that I don’t sit around a lot either at work or at home. I’m a busy bee. 

Vacation & Hobbies

Going on vacation, don’t even try to take me to a beach. If my wife wants to go to the beach, that’s all her. I’ll tag along and I’ll check in on her out there reading a book from time to time but, for the most part, I’ll be off doing, seeing, and experiencing. The ability to sit still and just relax…..that’s an ability I did not receive in this lifetime. 

As a result, I make live edge furniture. Go to Facebook and look up Amarillo live edge and custom furniture. I am a sculpture and charcoal artist. Go back to Facebook now and look up River Horse Art Gallery. I’m in the process of teaching myself to paint right now too. I also am a singer/songwriter. Go back to Facebook once again. Yes, once again and look up Flying Elbows Perspective.

Crazy name indeed. 

So, here’s the point. It’s not to brag or pump my tires. The point is that this is how important I’ve found the DACO program to be. While I haven’t completely put everything else on hold, the DACO has taken priority of my time. One reason is that I want to motor through it quickly and efficiently. The next reason would be that I’ll be the only DACO in all of Texas West of the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex. 

What does that get me? Maybe a pat on the back. Maybe a part time or full-time gig on staff at an FQHC. As we have mentioned in previous episodes, there are reports of DCs on FQHC staffs making as little as $120/visit up to $300/visit on even Medicaid visits. Unbelievable. But you have a better shot at getting into the system when you are specialized AKA – a Diplomate. 

Just a part of making us all better. You guys and gals need to be looking at this stuff. 

Before we hop into the papers for the week, I want to ask you to go to chiropracticforward.com and sign up for our newsletter. I think I have some pretty cool stuff coming down the pike you’ll be interested in. That’s in you enjoy evidence-based education.

Now, here we go with some vital information that we think can build confidence and improve your practice which will improve your life overall.

Paper #1

The first paper here is called “Reliability and validity of clinical tests to assess the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders: Part 1—A systematic review from the Cervical Assessment and Diagnosis Research Evaluation (CADRE) Collaboration” It was done my Madege Lemurnier et. al. and published in the European Spine Journal in September 2017[1]. 

Why They Did It

With a title as long as that one, what the heck are they doing here? They say they were hoping to determine the reliability of clinical tests to assess the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders. 

How They Did It

They updated the systematic review of the 2000-2010 Bone and Joint Decade Task Forst on Neck Pain and Associated Disorders. 

They searched the literature for studies on the reliability and validity of Doppler velocimetry to evaluate the cervical arteries. 

They had two independent evaluators look through it all

What They Found

  • Preliminary evidence showed that the extension-rotation test may be reliable and has adequate validity to rule out pain arising from facet joint. Or rule in I suppose. Just in case you are unaware of the cervical extension-rotation test, it’s exactly as it sounds. Have the patient extend and then rotate toward the side you’re testing. When you combine this maneuver with palpation you can typically get a good idea of whether the patient is suffering from a facet issue. You need to know that this test is also effective in sniffing out a low back facet issue as well. Lumbar extension and then rotation can give you some good clues sometimes.
  • The evidence suggests variable reliability and preliminary validity for the evaluation of cervical radiculopathy including neurological examination (manual motor testing, dermatomal sensory testing, deep tendon reflexes, and pathological reflex testing), Spurling’s and the upper limb neurodynamic tests.
  • No evidence found for doppler velocimetry. 

Wrap It Up

Little evidence exists to support the use of clinical tests to evaluate the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders. We found preliminary evidence to support the use of the extension–rotation test, neurological examination, Spurling’s and the upper limb neurodynamic tests.

Paper#2

On to our second paper. This one is called “Intervertebral kinematics of the cervical spine before, during, and after high-velocity low-amplitude manipulation” and appeared in Spine Journal in August of 2018 and was authored by Dr. William J. Anderst, et. al[2].

Why They Did It

Since cervical manipulation is such a common intervention for neck pain, the authors wanted to characterize the forces involved and the facet gapping that takes place during manipulation. 

How They Did It

It was a laboratory-based prospective observational study

It included 12 patients 

Each patient had acute mechanical neck pain

One of the outcome measurements was the neck pain rating scale (NPRS)

Other measurements were taken for amount and rate of cervical facet joint gapping 

What They Found

The authors concluded, “This study is the first to measure facet gapping during cervical manipulation on live humans. The results demonstrate that target and adjacent motion segments undergo facet joint gapping during manipulation and that intervertebral ROM is increased in all three planes of motion after manipulation. The results suggest that clinical and functional improvement after manipulation may occur as a result of small increases in intervertebral ROM across multiple motion segments.”

Pretty cool stuff. 

Paper #3

Our last paper for this episode is called, “CDC: Drug overdoses hit new record.” It’s an article on thehill.com written by Nathaniel Weixel and was published on August 15th of this year, 2018[3]. 

The article leads off saying that 72,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2017 and that’s based on information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That is a new record folks and we have our friends in the medical realm to thank for it. 

Who’s To Blame?

Now, that, of course, doesn’t mean pharmacists and medical doctors are bad and there was a mass conspiracy to cause this deal. But it does mean that SOME of them are bad. SOME doctors are doing time in an orange outfit right now because they knew better but the dollar was mightier than common sense and common decency. 

There were pharmacies dispensing 100x more than their population could ever consume but they want to not refer to us and talk about the integrity of the cervical spine. That kind of crap is what got us here.

But, it’s also what has brought chiropractors from the shadows into the light. When you have the mess the medical field has created, then you have to start looking for the non-pharma solutions and we are it. 

Comparison

72,000 deaths. You ever heard of the Vietnam War? Of course, you have. We all have. Some either remember or have seen what a big deal it was. The deaths, the protests, the loss. I’ve been to the Vietnam Wall in Washington DC several times. It’s profound. It’s stunning to see all of those names. 

Just to compare, the total number of those lost in Vietnam stands at 58,220. Now keep in mind, that takes into account deaths from as early as 1956 all the way up to as late as 2006 and comes from Defense Casualty Analysis System Extract Files from The Vietnam Conflict Extract Data File. 

I did my homework. I’m not giving you fake numbers here. 

Essentially, 13,780 more deaths happened because of opioids, In just one year. In just 2017. That doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface when you start totaling up 2016, 2015, and further back. Unbelievable isn’t it? 

If we look at it, 2014 had 28,647 deaths, 2015 had 33,100 deaths, 2016 saw 63,632 deaths…..and then 72,000 in 2017. 

I’m guessing you can see the trend. Hell yes, it’s an epidemic.

The Math

I’ll do the math for you because I love you and I’m glad you’re here and I don’t want you to have to think too hard while you’re giving me your time. Over the last 4 years, that’s approximately 200,000 opioid-related deaths. 197,379 to be more specific. 

The genie seems to be out of the bottle.

While we can’t put the genie back in, we can offer solutions for the future. Many of those addicted to opioids became addicted due to spinal surgery. Many of those surgeries were unnecessary. One paper I reviewed showed that approximately 5% of lumbar fusions are necessary making about 95% of the unnecessary. Yeah….95%. 

The Answer

We have the answer people. The American College of Physicians, The White House, The Lancet, 2 papers in JAMA, Consumer Report surveys, The Joint Commission, The FDA…..seriously, there is not one reason that we aren’t inundated by spinal pain referrals at this very moment. No reason at all. It actually makes me mad as hell that we are not. 

Exactly what the hell does it take to make general practitioners, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants understand that an evidence-based chiropractor is best situated to help these people as a first-line therapy?

Integrating Chiropractors

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment instead of chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show that many patients get good or excellent results through chiropractic for headaches, neck pain, back pain, joint pain, to name just a few.

Chiropractic care is safe and cost-effective. It can decrease instances of surgery & disability. Chiropractors normally do this through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal time requirements or hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient develops a “preventative” mindset going forward from initial recovery, chiropractors can likely keep it that way while raising the general, overall level of health of the patient!

Key Point:

Patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment offering the least harm.

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show or tell us your suggestions for future episodes. Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on iTunes and other podcast services. Y’all know how this works by now so help if you don’t mind taking a few seconds to do so.

Help us get to the top of podcasts in our industry. That’s how we get the message out. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

https://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

Twitter

YouTube

iTunes

Player FM Link

Stitcher:

TuneIn

About the Author and Host:

Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

CF 013: DEBUNKED: The Odd Myth That Chiropractors Cause Strokes (Part 1 of 3)

CF 012: Proven Means To Treat Neck Pain

CF 041: w/ Dr. William Lawson – Research For Neck Pain

CF 050: Chiropractic Care – Text Neck, Headaches, Migraines

 

 

 

Bibliography

1. Lemeunier N, Reliability and validity of clinical tests to assess the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders: Part 1—A systematic review from the Cervical Assessment and Diagnosis Research Evaluation (CADRE) Collaboration. Euro Spine J, 2017. 26(9): p. 2225-2241.

2. Anderst W, Intervertebral kinematics of the cervical spine before, during, and after high-velocity low-amplitude manipulation. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2018. 0(0).

3. Weixel N. CDC: Drug overdoses hit new record. The Hill 2018  5 August 2018]; Available from: https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/401961-cdc-drug-overdoses-hit-new-high-in-2017.