clinical practice

New Information On 5 Actions To Change Clinical Practice

CF 131: New Information On 5 Actions To Change Clinical Practice Today we’re going to talk about moving toward being patient-centered. There are 5 actions recommended. What does it even mean? I might just ruffle some feathers here but a damn I do not giveth. But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music  
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 
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Do it do it do it.  You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #131 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we were joined by Dr. Kevin Christie with The Modern Chiropractic Marketing podcast and author of a new book that’s coming out on chiropractic marketing. Kevin is a rising star in chiropractic and is a must-not-miss. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class.  While we’re on the topic of being smart, did you know that you can use our website as a resource? Quick and easy, you can go to chiropracticforward.com, click on Episodes, and use the search function to find whatever you want quickly and easily. With over 100 episodes in the tank and an average of 2-3 papers covered per episode, we have somewhere between 250 and 300 papers that can be quickly referenced along with their talking points.  Just so you know, all of the research we talk about in each episode is cited in the show notes for each episode if you’re looking to dive in a little deeper.  On the personal end of things….. Still climbing in the patient numbers. Where I’m located here in Amarillo, TX, there is a population of approximately 280,000 people. Last week, on Thursday and Friday we added 3 total cases of COVID on Thursday and only 2 cases on Friday. Then the following Monday, we added 11.  So, as you can see, the numbers here are no longer high. People are sort of ‘over it’ and you can see that and hear it when you talk to the patients. Hell, I’m sort of over it but still being smart. I’m having friends to the house again but we stay outside by the pool and have a couple of adult beverages.  I have a friend that is a musician. Last weekend, he played a rodeo on Woodward, OK. He said there were probably 1,000+ people at the event and it was indoors. So, in Woodward, OK at least, they are REALLY over it. No way in hell I’m grouping up with that many people indoor or outdoor right now. It just doesn’t make sense to me for now.  I guess if I were 28 and at the top of my game physically it wouldn’t make any difference to me either. But going to an event where people are yelling and cheering right behind, beside, and in front of me….big nopers right now. Ain’t happnin’ I noticed that while cases seem to be leveling off across America, they’re not increasing or decreasing as much as you’d like but, what I noticed is that the deaths are going down. Fairly signficantly. So wouldn’t that fit with the news that started coming out a couple weaks ago about the virus losing some potency?  People are still getting it but not as many dying from it. Another explanation could be that we’ve gotten better at treating it. Either way, that’s not my lane so I’m not going to act like the expert. I’ll just say hell yay-us and keep the good news coming so we can all get back to life as it was meant to be lived.  I hope you’re all well and staying healthy. As always, if you care about the kind of information I share every week and you listen consistently, I’m proud of you. I think you care about the right stuff and even though I don’t know you all, I consider you my friend.  Item #1 Let’s kick this week’s research reviews off with this one called ‘It is time to move beyond body region silos to manage musculoskeletal pain; five actinos to change clinical practice’ by Caneiro et. al(Caneiro JP 2020). published in British Journal of Sports Medicine in 2020. We got a hot one over here!! This paper actually has a lot of big names in the industry like Caneiro, O’Sullivan, O’Sullivan and Jan Hartvigsen. If you don’t know Jan’s name, you just haven’t been a regular listener.  Why They Did It They say that current clinical research, education, and practice approaches musculoskeletal pain and conditions in silos. Basically it’s a focus on body regions like the knee, hip, neck, shoulder, etc.  But current thinking actually shows that the pain disorders are frequently comorbid and share common biopsychosocial risk profiles for pain and disability.  They say that a shift to focusing on the person is what is needed and that this would encourage the doctors to:
  1. focus on the patients’ context and modifiable biopsychosocial factors that influence their pain and disability
  2. Use education to facilitate active management approaches (targeted exercise therapy, physical activity, and healthy lifestyle habits) thus reducing reliance on passive interventions
  3. Consider evidence-based surgical procedures only for those with a clear indication and where guideline-based non-surgical approaches have been rigorously adhered to. 
Well who the hell can’t get behind all of that? Honestly, it’s odd when you think about it that in the year 2020, we’re still saying that surgery should be evidence-based and follow certain guides and that conservative treatment should be first basically. How’s that not just common sense and common procedure in 2020? We’re supposed to have freaking flying cars by now but the medical field doesn’t have this stuff down they way they should just yet?  It’s money. I know. I understand it. But it’s frustrating as hell all the same.  In this paper, the authors say to be truly patient-centered, they have five actions they recommend for managing a person with musculoskeletal pain, irrespective of body region. 
  1. Screen for biopsychosocial factors and health comorbidities. Notice this is #1 on their recommendations. If you’re just getting them in a pop a crack a lack and sending them on without this step, your results are going to be less than you or the patient desires. They say we need to communicate clearly with the patient to identify potential biopsychosocial drivers of the pain and then provide the therapy to fill that gap. These things include pain beliefs, emotional and coping responses to pain, social contest, physical and lifestyle factors and the presence of comorbidities. They recommend using the Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire. 
  2. Embrace patient-centered communication. This one is huge and this is one of the key things we learned in the Fellowship training for the neuromusculoskeletal medicine program. Clinicians should use open and reflective questioning to elicit the patient’s understanding of factors, which include the pain experience (tell me your story), causation beliefs (what do they think is the cause of the pain?), coping (what do you do when the pain increases?), impact (Tell me how your symptoms affect your ability to move and function), concerns (do your symptoms worry you?), beliefs (why do you think you shouldn’t bend/lift, or run?), social factors (tell me about your home life or work life), goals (what are you rgoals?), and expectations. Yes, to an extent, updated research and thinking has us behaving a bit like a psychologist I think. It’s not my favorite stuff. But, when you learn and consider how much pain is held in the brain due to these yellow flag indicators, then you start to realize that pain, certainly chronic pain, cannot just be treated at a peripheral source. You have to address the pain from a central sensitization perspective at least equally or you risk never being able to help these patients. 
  3. Educate beyond words using active learning approaches. doctors have to embrace education as a central part of patient care if we are going to change behavior. We have to dispel myths about pain, imaging findings, and activity engagement (for example, hurt does not equal harm). They say that behavioral learning like exercise therapy can be used to bust myths that are unhelpful. Myths and beliefs that lead to things like fear avoidance. 
  4. Coach towards self-management. A large portion of the chiropractic profession wants and desires patients to depend on them week after week, month after month and that’s just not real world stuff. And it’s not helpful for the patient’s recovery either. We should be empowering patients to engage in exercise, valued activities and a healthy lifestyle with confidence. Can you feel the difference here? “Mary, I know you’re only 35 but you already have some degenerative discs in your neck and I’m so concerned about it. This should be considered urgent and I’m going to need to see you 5 million times for the rest of your life.” Is that helpful or is this helpful? “Mary, I know you read on your rad report here that there is a finding of a degenerative disc in your neck but the truth is, that’s very common and not something you should be concerned with. Certainly not over-concerned with. I actually prefer the word ‘deconditioned’ over ‘degenerative.’ A good percentage of 30-40 year old patients have some mildly deconditioned discs but these rarely ever cause any issues. You’re young, you’re strong, and you’re healthy. We’re going to get everything moving correctly and then I’m going to give you some excellent exercises to really focus on the region and build plenty of support. You’re going to do great.” When you stack those two next to each other, it’s easy to see how harmful one is as opposed to the other more positive, more hopeful one. I got a little side tracked there, the point is, help them take control and self manage. Active amnagement relieves pain and improves function across pain conditions and health comorbidities. 
  5. Address comorbid health factors. They say clinicians should refer for co-care in teh presence of comorbid mental and physical health complaints like high levels of emotional distress, eating disorders, and type 2 diabetes. The authors say they contend that multidisciplinary care needs to be integrated, with consistent messages across the team to prevent care fragmentation and patient distress. 
Wrapping up the paper, the authors say Patient-centered care will optimize the value of healthcare provided. Shifting funding to support high-value evidence-based care options and educating society will be critical to enable this transition and will likely be cost-effective. Integrated cross-discipline clinical networds are required for effective co-care. We believe clinicians are ready to change, but they require the support of health systems and payers.  One word….two syllables. Day-um. You day-um right. But, health systems and payers are stuck on the part of our profession that doesn’t care about movement, function, yellow flags, exercise, or proper patient-centered practice. They’re stuck on the portion of our profession that is TIC or TOR or principled or whatever the hell useless drivel they’re using this week.  The hardcore, philosophy, doctor-centered, faith-based rather than evidence-based group of chiropractors are smaller but they’re so much louder. And dangerous. They’re flat-earthers. They’re the reason the evidence-based group will never reach any kind of cultural authority.  You can have a GROUP of guys and girls go through years of continuing education and maybe get a couple of diplomats in neuro or orthopedics or rehab….wahtever….and they can be the smartest chiropractor on the planet and almost 100% of their patients get well.  And then you have just ONE lowsy-ass guy or girl go and bait and switch just ONE patient into 80 visits in a year with a contract and all of the bells and stupid whistles of a doctor-centered practice, and that group that worked so so hard loses every ounce of legitimacy. Because of ONE jackhole that refuses to understand or read research or refuses to sacrifice some money in the interest of their patients well-being.  It’s gross. It’s awful. But it’s chiropractic. We are already looked at with a side-glance untrusting gaze. So any deviance of behavior that would be widely considered normal is magnified. Just one ruins the batch for all of us.  I remember a preacher once saying that you gain trust in drops but you lose it in buckets. The reality in chiropractic is that just one faith-based, doctor-centered jackhole loses trust in ALL chiropractors in buckets. For ALL of us.  My plea is to start sharing this podcast with your subluxation friends. Especially the young students that haven’t yet decided to be ‘principled.’ Maybe we can help lead them down the right path from the very start. The more people are exposed to the research and to the idea of being patient-centered, the more they’ll latch onto it. They have to. One is borderline evil, and the other is not. It’s backed by science. One destroys reputations for the sake of the dollar. One builds reputations and respect. One is built on ideas and theories over a century old that cannot or have not been proven while the other is backed by science and progress. How is it even a damn choice to begin with? We’re either a healthcare profession. Or we are a faith. True healthcare professions do research and then they do more and they change according to what works well and they drop the stuff that doesn’t, and on and on to the point of really being on the cutting edge of the science and on the health of our patients.  I’ll never understand how such a percentage of our profession can’t get on board with that. Whatever the answer to that question might be, it’s that answer that keeps us at the bottom of the cultural authority ladder.  Unfortunately, I don’t see if changing any time soon. Not until the governing boards decided it’s time to change once and for all.   Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Continue taking care of yourselves and taking care of your neighbors. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.  Key Takeaways Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health! Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic! Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference.  Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. Website
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Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/ Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/ Twitter YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2 Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/ About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger   Bibliography Caneiro JP, R. E., Baron CJ, et. al., (2020). “It is time to move beyond ‘body region silos’ to manage musculoskeletal pain: five actions to change clinical practice.” Br J Sports Med 54: 435-443.