cognitive loss

Intermittent Fasting & Dementia And Your Level Of Activity

CF 212: Intermittent Fasting & Dementia And Your Level Of Activity

Today we’re going to talk about Intermittent Fasting & Dementia And Your Level Of Activity But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music    

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg
OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 
  • Go to Amazon and check our my book called The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research. It’s a great resource for patient education and for YOU. It saves you time in putting talks together or just staying current on research. It’s categorized into sections and written in a way that is easy to understand for you and your patients. Just search for it on Amazon. That’s the Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic by Jeff Williams. 
  • Then go Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group, and then 
  • Review our podcast on whatever platform you’re listening to 
  • The last thing real quick, we also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #212 Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about Chiropractic And Colicky Babies & Breathing With Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class.  On the personal end of things….. Things slow down in January for most of us. That’s a time to set some goals, a time to get your taxes prepped for your CPA, and a time to reflect on the year we just wrapped up and where we can leverage our experience to springboard beyond next year.  You never can tell with some offices. But for me, January through the end of February is traditionally slower than the rest of the year. We usually see a slow down again around back-to-school time in late August. Other than those times of the year, it’s typically nonstop busy busy.  So, while it’s slow, we use that to our advantage. Have you lined up your marketing plan for the next year? Have you started gathering your tax info for your accountant? It’s probably a decent time to do a recall effort. Have your staff contact patients you haven’t seen in forever and ask them how their holidays went and make sure they’re doing good. Just a check-in type of thing.  You’d be amazed at how many people just like to know they weren’t forgotten and how a checkin from our office can spur them to go ahead and come on back in because their back has been nagging lately or those headaches have started creeping back in later.  Employees. If you’ve followed along, we just recently replaced the front desk staffer. Now, just this morning we got a 2-week notice for one of our best back-office staff members. Ugh, right?? So, now it’s off I go to find a replacement there. You always hate losing one of your best. The job she’s going to pays $1.50 more per hour and offers a 401k. Well, she was due next month for a yearly raise and we’ve offered 401ks in the past but no employees ever took us up on the offer. But, she never asked and I’m never going to beg someone to stay. That’s not in my DNA. But if employees would talk to us before jumping ship, there may be something we can do to hold on to the best of them.  But it is what it is. Now, we have a staffer trying to take vacation days she doesn’t have and it’s just blah around here so here we go. I’m just going to get into this episode and forget all my woes.  Item #1 The first one today is called “Intermittent Fasting and Obesity-Related Health Outcomes An Umbrella Review of Meta-analyses of Randomized Clinical Trials” by Patikorn et. al. (Patikorn C 2021) and published in JAMA Network Open on December 17, 2021, Hot tamale! Why They Did It The authors wanted to answer the questions, “What is the association of intermittent fasting with health outcomes and what is the strength of evidence of studies on intermittent fasting?” How They Did It
  • This was a meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
  • They went through databases that included Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane
  • The search was done from April 2021
  • They found 11 meta-analyses comprising 130 RCTs, 38 participants
What They Found
  • There were 28 statistically significant associations (27%) that demonstrated the beneficial outcomes for body mass index, body weight, fat mass, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, and blood pressure. 
  • IF was found to be associated with reduced fat-free mass. 
  • One significant association (1%) supported by high-quality evidence was modified alternate-day fasting for 1 to 2 months, which was associated with a moderate reduction in body mass index in healthy adults and adults with overweight, obesity, or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease compared with regular diet. 
  • Six associations (6%) were supported by moderate-quality evidence. 
Wrap It Up In this umbrella review, we found beneficial associations of IF with anthropometric and cardiometabolic outcomes supported by moderate to the high quality of evidence, which supports the role of IF, especially modified alternate-day fasting, as a weight loss approach for adults with overweight or obesity. Item #2 Our last one today is called “Association of Physical Activity Level With Risk of Dementia in a Nationwide Cohort in Korea” by Yoon et. al. (Yoon M 2021) and published in JAMA Network Open on December 16th of 2021. Hot hot hot. A lot hot.  Why They Did It The authors wanted to answer the question, “Is physical activity, especially light-intensity physical activity, independently associated with new-onset dementia?” How They Did It
  • It was a nationwide retrospective cohort study, 
  • They analyzed 62,286 participants aged 65 years or older without preexisting dementia who had available health checkup data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service database from January 2009 to December 2012. 
  • Participants were followed up until December 31, 2013, and 
  • data analysis was performed from July 2020 to January 2021.
  • Physical activity level was assessed using a standardized, self-reported questionnaire at baseline. 
  • Physical activity-related energy expenditure was calculated by summing the product of frequency, intensity, and duration.
What They Found I’m not going to tell you. Because we try to keep it simple light and fun around here and getting into the specifics here will make you wonder what happens when you turn on your headlights if you’re car were to be moving the speed of light. Like….why are there braille dots on a drive-up ATM? What’s up with that? Anyway, we’re skipping right to the conclusions.  Wrap It Up In older adults, an increased physical activity level, including a low amount of light-intensity physical activity, was associated with a reduced risk of dementia. Promotion of light-intensity physical activity might reduce the risk of dementia in older adults. This is a bit different from previous findings. They recommended medium intensity or higher to reduce dementia risk. They also have now shown that total sedentary behavior is associated with unfavorable health outcomes. Which is really no surprise, is it??  Alright, that’s it. Keep on keepin’ on. Keep changing our profession from your corner of the world. The world needs evidence-based, patient-centered practitioners driving the bus. The profession needs us in the ACA and involved in the leadership of state associations. So quit griping about the profession if you’re doing nothing to make it better. Get active, get involved, and make it happen. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.  Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg
  The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health! Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic! Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference.  Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. Website
Home
Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/ Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/ Twitter YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2 Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/ About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine (FIANM) and Board Certified Diplomate of the American Board of Forensic Professionals (DABFP) – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger   Bibliography Patikorn C, R. K., Veettil SK, (2021). “Intermittent Fasting and Obesity-Related Health Outcomes: An Umbrella Review of Meta-analyses of Randomized Clinical Trials.” JAMA Netw Open 4(12).   Yoon M, Y. P., Jin M (2021). “Association of Physical Activity Level With Risk of Dementia in a Nationwide Cohort in Korea.” JAMA Netw Open 4(12).