evidence-based chiropractic

How Car Wrecks Contribute To Future Neck and Back Pain

CF 196: How Car Wrecks Contribute To Future Neck and Back Pain

Today we’re going to talk about How Car Wrecks Contribute To Future Neck and Back Pain. I have two different papers with what I thought were surprising conclusions in one way or another. Not only did I find themm a bit surprising but I don’t think the defense attorneys in PI cases will like either paper much. Just an assumption on my part. All of that coming up in this episode. But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music      

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

        OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Go to Amazon and check our my book called The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research. It’s an invaluable resource for your patient education and for you. It can save you time in putting talks together or just staying current on research. It’s categorized into sections so that the information is easy to find and it’s written in a way that is easy to understand for practitioner as well as patient. You have to check it out. Just search for it on Amazon. That’s the Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic by Jeff Williams. 
  • Then go Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #196 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about Spinal Manipulative Therapy vs. Opioids and Young Elite Pitchers, Hips, and Elbow Pain. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

 

On the personal end of things…..

We just ended our fourth week as an integrated practice and starting our fifth. It’s a struggle. I’m not going to lie. You see the money going out but you don’t see it coming in. That’s why, to pull this off, you need to be a busy Chiro and you need to have reserves in place.

Otherwise, it could be doomed. Unless you’re a hype machine. A marketing mastermind that fills the schedule before the integration even takes place. Let’s be honest, most of us just aren’t. I know the value of marketing. I know how to market on a fundamental level. But it’s hard. It’s hard to get your message out there and it’s hard to break through.

So, week one, maybe 4-5 appointments. Week two, maybe 18 appointments. Week 2 was about the same. Then last week was maybe only 8-9. So it’s up and down. We aren’t covering the salary but, we have reserves set back AND I’m fortunate enough to be busy.  The trick is just getting the message out and I feel like we’re doing that both externally as well as internally.

We have in-office brochures, flyers, and posters. Email marketing, social media, and all that good hoopla. It’s happening. We’re making it happen. 

In other news, I recovered from my five days in Washington DC. Geez. What a go-cation. It’s not the cost of taking a trip. It’s the cost of being gone. How much money you lose by not being in the office. That’s the real number and it just kills me!! So, I don’t think about it because I truly believe we need to be taking a trip once per quarter. You have to so you don’t lose your damn mind. It’s just a must.

Speaking of, I have a trip in just about three weeks to Chicago for business to finish off my Fellowship in Forensics. I’m looking forward to that and to networking with everyone involved with that whole side of the profession. Multiple streams of income folks. I do it inside the office as well as outside. Speaking, mentoring, authoring, medico-legal, Ortho fellowship, personal injury, family, triwest, acupuncture, massage, laser, esthetician, Texas Chiropractic Association, Texas Council of Chiropractic Orthopedists, Nurse Prac, and everything that falls under that.

That’s inside.

Outside is music, voice-over, art, real estate investing, and all kinds of other things I’m looking at.  What would it be like to just do a couple Of things?  Who knows? That’s just not me.  I make myself crazy but I honestly don’t know any other way. 

If you were thinking you could get into business for yourself and sit on the computer half the day fiddle assing on the computer, I got news. Your competition is out there getting Diplomates, certifications, and expertise to run circles around you.

Get busy.

Or wonder where all of those new patients are going since they don’t seem to be coming to see you.

Item #1

Alright, let’s hop in with our first one today called “Exposure to a Motor Vehicle Collision and the Risk of Future Neck Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” by Nolet et. al. (Nolet PS 2019) and published in PM&R in November of 2019. In case you didn’t know, PM&R stands for physical medicine and rehabilitation. 

Why They Did It

They say in the abstract that neck injury resulting from a crash is associated with a high rate of chronicity. Prognosis studies indicate 50% of injured people continue to experience NP a year after the collision. This is difficult to interpret due to the high prevalence of NP in the general population. In other words, those that have not been in a car wreck still have neck pain, right? The stated goal of the authors here was to summarize the literature that has examined the association between a motor vehicle collision (MVC) related neck injury and future neck pain (NP) when compared to the population that has not been exposed to neck injury from a crash.

How They Did It

  • They performed a systematic review of the literature using five electronic databases, searching for risk studies on exposure to a car crash and future neck pain published from 1998 to 2018. 
  • The outcome of interest was future neck pain. 
  • Eligible risk studies were critically appraised using the modified Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) instrument. 
  • Eight articles were identified of which seven were of lower risk of bias. Six studies reported a positive association between a neck injury in an MVC and future NP compared to those without a neck injury in an MVC

What They Found

  • Pooled analysis of the six studies indicated an unadjusted relative risk of future neck pain in the car crash-exposed population with neck injury of 2.3, which equates to a 57% attributable risk to those having been in a car wreck. 
  • In two studies where exposed participants were either not injured or injury status was unknown, there was no increased risk of future neck pain

Wrap It Up

They wrap it up by saying, “There was a consistent positive association among studies that have examined the association between MVC-related neck injury and future neck pain. These findings are of potential interest to clinicians, insurers, patients, governmental agencies, and the courts.” I see personal injury patients. This is good info for their reports, their file, and their attorneys if they’re represented. 

 

Item #2 This one is called, “Exposure to a motor vehicle collision and the risk of future back pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis” by Nolet, et. al.  (Paul S. Nolet 2020)and this one was published in Accident Analysis and Prevention in 2020.  It’s not that hot but I’m using it anyway just because I like it and cuz I say so….

Why They Did It The purpose of this study is to summarize the evidence for the association between exposure to a motor vehicle collision (MVC) and future low back pain (LBP).

How They Did It

  • A systematic search of five electronic databases from 1998 to 2019 was performed. 
  • Eligible studies describing exposure to a MVC and risk of future non-specific LBP were critically appraised using the Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) instrument. 
  • The search strategy yielded 1136 articles, three of which were found to be at low to medium risk of bias after critical appraisal. 

What They Found

  • All three studies reported a positive association between an acute injury in a MVC and future LBP. 
  • Pooled analysis of the results resulted in an unadjusted relative risk of future LBP in the MVC-exposed and injured population versus the non-exposed population of 2.7, which equates to a 63 % attributable risk under the exposed.

Wrap It Up

There was a consistent positive association in the critically reviewed literature that investigated the risk of future LBP following an acute MVC-related injury. For the patient with chronic low back pain who was initially injured in a MVC, more often than not (63 % of the time) the condition was caused by the MVC.  Thats a lot right, folks? Look, it’s obvious to say an injury was caused by a car wreck. It’s common as a chiropractor to hear patients tell you that their neck pain started with a car wreck they had 20 years before. We hear it all of the time.  But for reals, 57% for the neck and 63% of the back?

That’s solid and flies directly in the face of the other side of the courtroom when they try to tell jurors that the forces experienced in a low-speed impact are about the same as stepping off of a curb on the street. This is, by the way, one of the most ridiculous things I’ve ever heard in my entire life but an argument that they most certainly use periodically.  Fools!!!! The fools we must suffer in life!! I’m sure plenty of folks refer to me in the same manner. It is what it is. Let’s all just try to be the least of the fools…., if that makes any sense at all. 

Alright, that’s it.

Keep on keepin’ on. Keep changing our profession from your corner of the world. The world needs evidence-based, patient-centered practitioners driving the bus so get active, get involved, and make it happen. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.         

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

  The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter https://twitter.com/Chiro_Forward

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

Nolet PS, E. P., Kristman VL, Murnaghan K, Zeegers MP, Freeman MD (2019). “Exposure to a Motor Vehicle Collision and the Risk of Future Neck Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” PM R. 11(11): 1228-1239.  

Paul S. Nolet, P. C. E., Vicki L. Kristman, Kent Murnaghan, Maurice P. Zeegers, Michael D. Freeman (2020). “Exposure to a motor vehicle collision and the risk of future back pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis.” Accid Anal and Prev 142.          

To Do Lists, Frailty, and Pain & Lost Work Days

CF 192: To-Do Lists, Frailty, and Pain & Lost Work Days

Today we’re going to talk about To-Do Lists, Frailty, and Pain & Lost Workdays

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Go to Amazon and check our my book called The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research. It’s an invaluable resource for your patient education and for you. It can save you time in putting talks together or just staying current on research. It’s categorized into sections so that the information is easy to find and it’s written in a way that is easy to understand for practitioners as well as patient. You have to check it out. Just search for it on Amazon. That’s the Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic by Jeff Williams. 
  • Then go Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #192 Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about chiropractic preventing opioids and chiropractic adverse events. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

I am starting week three of the medical integration. It’s stressful but it’s exciting too. Every day I’m convinced more and more that we picked the right nurse practitioner. Super smart and excellent with patients.  I’m lying if I act like there’s no anxiety in this deal though. Damn. The money flying out the doors in a direction is almost stunning. With little money coming in on the medical side. Everything has to start at ground zero. That’s a given. Everything has to grow from seed. That’s a given.  The trick is to get to maturity and profitability as quickly as humanly possible. That’s what we’re trying to do.  We’ve been doing social media and are about to do a direct Mail piece as well. We’re trying to get this thing on its feet muy pronto! Switching gears here, how do you stay productive? My means of staying productive is really pretty simple.

I keep a ToDo list and I follow it daily. I have it broken down into two sections. One is a grid. The days of the week are along the top of the grid. What HAS to be accomplished are listed below the day it has to be done. Then, I have a simple list outside of the grid. They’re things that need to be done when time allows. Outside of the must-do’s they’re the need to do’s if you will. So, for example, on Mondays, I have to write, record, edit, and upload the podcast. It’s a scramble from start to finish when I also have 40 or more patients to contend with as well. Sometimes I get it all done. Sometimes I just get it written and record it as time allows the rest of the week Don’t forget about email. I get at least 50-100 every day so that’s a job all by itself sometimes. I unsubscribe as often as I can.

I don’t like garbage and minutiae. Can’t have it. No time for that. Tuesdays, it’s my clinic’s blog that has to be written, the corresponding video is recorded, and it’s uploaded to YouTube and Facebook. Again, all accomplished between patients. I get off on Tuesdays around 2 pm. Sometimes that extra afternoon time is used to catch up. Sometimes I go home, work out, do voice-over, and then take classes toward the Forensics Diplomate. As you can see, Monday and Tuesday is go time. Wednesdays I  write and send a mass email to my emailing list with the blog and video I recorded the day before included. Usually, things start to loosen up a bit by the time Wednesday rolls around and I’m able to give attention to the Need To-Dos. Some marketing and all that good stuff. Thursdays I upload the new podcast episode, I post it on Facebook, I send out an email to my list, and lost it in our private Facebook group.

Then marketing, patients, voice-over, another website project I’m working on, and whatever else crosses the desk. Friday, I get off at 1 pm. The afternoon is spent catching up, taking classes, getting in phone calls with people that think they just have to get you on a phone call, or I hit happy hour if I’m lucky. So that’s my week. I don’t get on phone calls. If it can’t be texted or emailed, don’t bother. I don’t talk to salespeople. I don’t entertain anything that takes me off task if I can help it. I can’t. So that’s how I get it all done. The list is my priority and I make sure each item is accomplished. It keeps me on track, it keeps this podcast rolling, it keeps my clinic rolling, and it keeps my brain from exploding. Tel me how you stay on track. I’d love to hear about it. Email me at [email protected]

Item #1

The first one today is called “The Predictability of Frailty Associated with Musculoskeletal Deficits: A Longitudinal Study” by Tembo et. al. (Tembo 2021) and published in Calcified Tissue Interrnational……which is as niche-y as niche can be and it was published on May 20 of 2021. Good Lawd….the heat. 

Why They Did It

They wanted to investigate and quantify the predictability of frailty associated with musculoskeletal parameters. 

How They Did It

It was a longitudinal study Involved 287 men over 50 years old Baseline musculoskeletal measures included  femoral neck bone mineral density appendicular lean mass index whole-body fat mass index lower limb strength Frailty at the 15 year follow-up was defined as > or = to 3 of the following 1. Untintentional weight loss 2. Weakness 3. Low physical activity 4. Exhaustion 5. Slowness

What They Found

  • 48 men were frail. That’s 16.7%
  • Musculoskeletal models were better predictors of frailty
  • Musculoskeletal parameters improved the predictability model as measured by AUROC for frailty after 15 years

Wrap It Up In general, muscle models performed better compared to bone models. Musculoskeletal parameters improved the predictability of frailty of the referent model that included lifestyle factors. Muscle deficits accounted for a greater proportion of the risk for frailty than did bone deficits. For getting musculoskeletal health could be a possible avenue of intervention in regards to frailty.

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #2

This one is called “Guideline adherence and lost workdays for acute low back pain in the California workers’ compensation system” by Gaspar et. al. (Gaspar FW 2021) and published in PLoS ONE on June 17, of 2021 and that’s stuh, stuh, stuh, steamy people. 

Why They Did It

The authors wanted to quantify the influence of adherence to guideline-recommended interventions in the first week of treatment for an initial low back pain (LBP) injury on lost workdays.

How They Did It

  • It was a retrospective cohort of California’s workers’ compensation claims data from May 2009 to May 2018
  • 41 diagnostic and treatment interventions were abstracted from the medical claims for workers with acute LBP injuries and compared with guideline recommendations.
  • Lost workdays within 1-year post-injury were compared by guideline adherence using quantile regressions.
  • Of the 59,656 workers who met the study inclusion criteria, 66.1% were male and the average (SD) age was 41 (12) years

What They Found

  • The median number (IQR) of lost workdays was 27 (6–146) days. 
  • In the first week of treatment, 14.2% of workers received only recommended interventions, 14.6% received only non-recommended interventions, and 51.1% received both recommended and non-recommended interventions
  • Opioid prescriptions fell 86% from 2009 to 2018
  • Workers who received only guideline-recommended interventions experienced significantly fewer lost workdays (11.5 days; 95% CI: -13.9, -9.1), a 29.3% reduction, than workers who received only non-recommended interventions
  • The percentage of workers receiving only recommended interventions increased from 10.3% to 18.2% over the 9 years.

Wrap It Up

When workers received guideline-recommended interventions, they typically returned to work in fewer days. The majority of workers received at least one non-recommended intervention, demonstrating the need for adherence to guideline recommendations. Fewer lost workdays and improved quality care are outcomes that strongly benefit injured workers.

Alright, that’s it. Keep on keepin’ on. Keep changing our profession from your corner of the world. The world needs evidence-based, patient-centered practitioners driving the bus so get active, get involved, and make it happen.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.  Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg
The Message
I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!
Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!
Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 
Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.
Website https://www.chiropracticforward.com
Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/
Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/
Twitter https://twitter.com/Chiro_Forward
YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q
iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2
Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021
Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through
TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/
About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger
Bibliography Gaspar FW, T. M., Wizner K, Hegmann K, (2021). “Guideline adherence and lost workdays for acute low back pain in the California workers’ compensation system.” PLoS One 16(6).   Tembo, M. C., Mohebbi, M., Holloway-Kew, K.L, (2021). “The Predictability of Frailty Associated with Musculoskeletal Deficits: A Longitudinal Study.” Calcified Tissue Int.  

 

Chiropractic Prevents Opioids & Chiropractic Adverse Events

CF 191: Chiropractic Prevents Opioids & Chiropractic Adverse Events Today we’re going to talk about chiropractic care preventing opioids and chiropractic adverse events.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

  OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Go to Amazon and check our my book called The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research. It’s an invaluable resource for your patient education and for you. It can save you time in putting talks together or just staying current on research. It’s categorized into sections so that the information is easy to find and it’s written in a way that is easy to understand for practitioner as well as patient. You have to check it out. Just search for it on Amazon. That’s the Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic by Jeff Williams. 
  • Then go Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #191 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about Obesity In Youths With Chronic Pain, The Healing Journey of Pain, and Fibromyalgia Treatment. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

So, if you’re a regular listener, then you know that I’ve been slowly going through the Forensics Diplomate program. The initial 40 hours through ChiroCredit were not my favorites. Learning about court cases, procedures, and all that stuff…..let’s just say it’s not my skill set.  But, I did it. I sat through it all. Now I’m on to the course for impairment ratings through the AMA. It’s speaking my language a little more. OK….a lot more. It’s still very technical and all that good stuff but it makes a little more sense. However, it is written by medical doctors for medical doctors so there is a section that got me a bit hot. Did you know in the 6th edition of the Guides to Impairment, it says that chiropractors should stick with only assessing impairment of the spine….because….you know……we didn’t spend two full semesters dissecting an entire body or anything like that. Right?

The presenter said he realizes that statement may bring about some discussion but the evaluator must have knowledge, skills, and ability in that organ system or in that region to assess impairment. Otherwise, the impairment rating is likely to be faulty. So…..I guess chiropractors somehow have the inability to learn, know, or understand a shoulder, hip, ankle, etc? Let’s be fair, I get it if they think a chiropractor shouldn’t really be assessing impairment of the liver or GI system.

That’s not within our wheelhouse. But muscles, bones, ligaments, tendons, and joints of all sorts are damn well within our wheelhouse and it’s just dumb to act like a regular impairment doc doing impairment ratings are any more intimately familiar with them than we are.  That’s some elitist BS right there. And it stinks and smells like old outdated dogma. But let’s also be fair to them. Even though they’ve rarely given us the same respect in return. This was reprinted in 2009. I’m not sure when the original printing was. I’m sure the course I’m watching was done around the same time as well.  Think about it; how many changes have you seen in the MD/DC relationship arena in just the last 10 years alone? I’ve seen a lot.

Especially since the American College of Physicians came out in 2016 recommending spinal manipulative therapy for acute and chronic low back pain. On the heels of that The Lancet report on low back pain echoed the recommendation. Then Dr. Goertz’s paper was in JAMA showing how well veterans did when spinal manipulative therapy was added into the treatment protocol.  Plus, I see more and more chiropractors moving in the right direction. The direction of evidence-based, patient-centered care. Where decades ago, an MD wouldn’t bowl against a team that had a chiropractor on it and they wouldn’t even accept referrals from us, to now.

Now, I have a nurse practitioner working hand and hand with me every day. Some of the people I count as buddies are a vascular surgeon, and ER doc, and a neurosurgeon.  So….maybe the course just needs an update. Who knows? But it pissed me off a little and I paid $487 to get pissed off. Lol. This too shall pass. In fact, it may already have passed.  Alright, NP medical integration week #2. It’s getting there. Our NP did hormone pellet procedure last week. That whole process is pretty cool. Patients have to do the lab work first to make sure it’s necessary. But if it is, it can make a big difference for folks. We doing PRP shots, trigger point shots, B12 shots….it’s all pretty darn interesting and it’s multimodal. Which is evidence-based and, as always, I balance it in a patient-centered way. 

So, now in my office, we have me, exercise/rehab, medical services, acupuncture, 3 massage therapists, and all of the other stuff you’d expect in therapies. It’s grown into quite a deal.  I had a patient ask me the other day if I was a franchise. I asked why they’d think that? They just said that we offer so many things that he figured it was a franchise. I said no, we’re not. But I likened it to my step-dad’s shop. He’s got every tool, cord, clamp, and gadget you’d ever want in a shop. But when you ask him how he got it all, he’ll tell you that he got it one at a time. Kind of like Clint Eastwood in El Torino.  You just gather and grow as you need. As the risk makes sense. There was a time when getting a $13,000 decompression table was a big damn deal and came with a lot of financial risks. 

Now, understandably, the risk is different. To expand and grow, it costs more. You have to stick your neck out a little further and hope it doesn’t get chopped off.  There are sinkers and swimmers in this world. I like to think I’m a swimmer. It’s OK to venture out a little further each time you stretch. As long as you know how to swim. And I have the doggy paddle down, folks. Just keep swimming just keep swimming.  Alright, let’s dive into the research. 

Item #1

This one’s called “Impact of Chiropractic Care on Use of Prescription Opioids in Patients with Spinal Pain” by Whedon et. Al. (James M Whedon 2020) and published in Pain Medicine in December of 2020 and that’s just hot enough. 

Why They Did It They say “Utilization of nonpharmacological pain management may prevent unnecessary use of opioids. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of chiropractic utilization upon use of prescription opioids among patients with spinal pain.”

How They Did It

  • We employed a retrospective cohort design for analysis of health claims data from three contiguous states for the years 2012–2017.
  • They included adults aged 18–84 years enrolled in a health plan and with office visits to a primary care physician or chiropractor for spinal pain
  • They identified two cohorts of subjects: Recipients received both primary care and chiropractic care, and nonrecipients received primary care but not chiropractic care.
  • The total number of subjects was 101,221

What They Found

  • Overall, between 1.55 and 2.03 times more nonrecipients filled an opioid prescription, as compared with recipients
  • Similar differences were observed for the acute groups.

Wrap It Up

Patients with spinal pain who saw a chiropractor had HALF the risk of filling an opioid prescription.   

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #2 Number two today is called “Safety of spinal manipulation in the treatment of lumbar disk herniations: a systematic review and risk assessment” by Drew Oliphant (Oliphant D) and published in the Journal of Manipulative Physiological Therapeutics in 2004. Definitely not hot. 

Why They Did It The authors wanted to provide a qualitative systematic review of the risk of spinal manipulation in the treatment of lumbar disk herniations (LDH) and to estimate the risk of spinal manipulation causing a severe adverse reaction in a patient presenting with LDH.

How They Did It

  • They considered relevant case reports, review articles, surveys, and investigations regarding treatment of lumbar disk herniations with spinal manipulation and adverse effects and associated risks
  • Prospective/retrospective studies and review papers were graded according to quality, and results and conclusions were tabulated. 
  • From the data published, an estimate of the risk of spinal manipulation causing a clinically worsened disk herniation or cauda equina syndrome (CES) in patients presenting with LDH was calculated. 
  • This was compared with estimates of the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and surgery in the treatment of LDH.

What They Found An estimate of the risk of spinal manipulation causing a clinically worsened disk herniation or CES in a patient presenting with LDH is calculated from published data to be less than 1 in 3.7 million.

Wrap It Up The apparent safety of spinal manipulation, especially when compared with other “medically accepted” treatments for LDH, should stimulate its use in the conservative treatment plan of LDH.

Item #3 The last one is called “Serious Adverse Events and Spinal Manipulative Therapy of the Low Back Region: A Systematic Review of Cases” by Herbert et. al.  and published in the Journal of Manipulative Physiological Therapeutics in 2015. Again….not hot but that’s OK. It’s a Systematic Review. 

Why They Did It The purpose of this study was to systematically search the literature for studies reporting serious adverse events following lumbopelvic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and to describe the case details.

How They Did It

  • A systematic search was conducted in PubMed including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library up to January 12, 2012, by an experienced reference librarian. 
  • Study selection was performed by 2 independent reviewers using predefined criteria. 
  • We included cases involving individuals 18 years or older who experienced a serious adverse event following SMT applied to the lumbar spine or pelvis by any type of provider (eg, chiropractic, medical, physical therapy, osteopathic, layperson). 
  • A serious adverse event was defined as an occurrence that results in death or is life threatening, requires hospital admission, or results in significant or permanent disability. 
  • A total of 2046 studies were screened, and 41 studies reporting on 77 cases were included.

What They Found

  • Important case details were frequently unreported, such as descriptions of SMT technique, the pre-SMT presentation of the patient, the specific details of the adverse event, time from SMT to the adverse event, factors contributing to the adverse event, and clinical outcome. 
  • Adverse events consisted of cauda equina syndrome (29 cases, 38% of total); lumbar disk herniation (23 cases, 30%); fracture (7 cases, 9%); hematoma or hemorrhagic cyst (6 cases, 8%); or other serious adverse events (12 cases, 16%) such as neurologic or vascular compromise, soft tissue trauma, muscle abscess formation, disrupted fracture healing, and esophageal rupture.

Wrap It Up

The anecdotal nature of these cases does not allow for causal inferences between SMT and the events identified in this review.  When chiropractic is done responsibly and appropriately, it’s safer than almost any medical intervention. It just is. Now, when you have people damn near yanking people’s heads off of their bodies, aggressively adjusting patients on YouTube that have had a significant history of stroke, and adjusting 80 year old women with the same gusto you’d use with a 25 year old male…..well….those folks are just asking for it.  Alright, that’s it. Keep on keepin’ on. Keep changing our profession from your corner of the world.

The world needs evidence-based, patient-centered practitioners driving the bus so get active, get involved, and make it happen. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

  The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website https://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter https://twitter.com/Chiro_Forward

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger  

Bibliography

  • James M Whedon, D., MS, Andrew W J Toler, MS, Louis A Kazal, MD, Serena Bezdjian, PhD, Justin M Goehl, DC, MS, Jay Greenstein, DC (2020). “Impact of Chiropractic Care on Use of Prescription Opioids in Patients with Spinal Pain.” Pain Med 21(12): 3567-3573.  
  • Oliphant D “Safety of spinal manipulation in the treatment of lumbar disk herniations: a systematic review and risk assessment.” J Man Physiol Ther 27(3): 197-210.  

Obesity In Youths With Chronic Pain, The Healing Journey of Pain, and Fibromyalgia Treatment

CF 190: Obesity In Youths With Chronic Pain, The Healing Journey of Pain, and Fibromyalgia Treatment

Today we’re going to talk about obesity in youth and chronic pain, we’ll talk about fibromyalgia and hyperbaric oxygen chambers, and we’ll talk about chronic pain and the healing journey.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg
OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 
  • Go to Amazon and check our my book called The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research. It’s an invaluable resource for your patient education and for you. It can save you time in putting talks together or just staying current on research. It’s categorized into sections so that the information is easy to find and it’s written in a way that is easy to understand for practitioner as well as patient. You have to check it out. Just search for it on Amazon. That’s the Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic by Jeff Williams. 
  • Then go Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 
You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #190 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we were joined by the amazing Dr. Brett Winchester from the St. Louis area. This doctor is just phenomenal in everything he does and says and we are all fortunate to have him in this profession. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class.  On the personal end of things….. Day 1 of our nurse practitioner starting is today. This morning has, of course, had its hiccups. We have the EHR where we have him set up but he has to have his own login and password and all that good stuff so that’s been one challenge so far.  Just getting oriented with where all of the stuff is, lidocaine, lab tubes, swabs, blah blah blah. Still waiting on the autoclave and still getting the malpractice policy in place this morning. What a process that’s been.  But we knew there’d be hiccups, and we’re getting them addressed. Then I have my regular life to contend with. I have patients to treat and a podcast to write so here we go. Short and sweet on this one because my cup is running over this morning.  Item #1 Our first item today is called “Obesity in Youth with Chronic Pain: Giving It the Seriousness It Deserves” by Hainsworth et. al. (Keri R Hainsworth 2021) and published in Pain Medicine in June of 2021 and day-um…..that’s hot! Why They Did It The aim of this commentary is to review the current science on co-occurring chronic pain and obesity in children and adolescents. In so doing, we also highlight some of the current gaps in knowledge. It is our hope that this commentary will draw attention to an overlooked area of research and clinical endeavors within the field of pediatric pain. The authors note that it is becoming increasingly clear that we should be familiar with this research. Both chronic pain and obesity have been rising in children for some time and studies are showing that obesity exacerbates the negative outcomes associated with chronic pain.  In addition, accumulating research exists on all facets of the co-occurrence of chronic pain and obesity in adults. Given all this, the paucity of research in this area of pediatric chronic pain and obesity is at a minimum, disheartening, and at a maximum, unconscionable. Ooooweee! That’s like putting a white glove on and smacking some clown around the room a little bit, isn’t it? I like it. It give me a little tickle.  Here are their main points:
  • On average, it can take 2 years longer for youth with obesity to be referred to a pediatric pain clinic than it does for youth with a normal weight
  • Pediatric patients with CPO have health-related quality of life that is more impaired in every domain than patients with chronic pain and a healthy body mass index percentile
  • Although systemic inflammation is commonly elevated in youth with obesity, patients with CPO have significantly higher levels of systemic inflammation than those with chronic pain alone or obesity alone 
  • Children with CPO are at increased risk of being treated as though they bear more responsibility for their health (and by extension, their pain) than youth without obesity and are at increased risk of pain dismissal and biased medical care
  • CPO in children and adolescents is associated with more impaired physical functioning and lower levels of physical activity than youth with chronic pain alone or obesity alone Further, parents report that their children with CPO (particularly girls) have greater functional disability (one of the most important outcomes in our field) than parents of youth with chronic pain and a normal body mass index
  • While multidisciplinary pain management programs work well for patients with a healthy weight, this is not true for those with comorbid obesity. Patients with a healthy weight improve in functional disability within 3 months of intake, whereas patients with CPO stagnate
First, even though we as clinicians and researchers need to address obesity in the context of chronic pain, we must be extremely thoughtful about how we move forward. Weight is a very sensitive subject, therefore, the call for more research in this area must strongly consider the need for sensitivity. CPO is the co-occurrence of a typically “invisible,” debilitating condition coupled with a condition so visible that it is sadly associated with victimization from important people in the child’s life, including peers, parents, and teachers Second, we would do well to closely follow the admonitions and advice of our colleagues whose primary clinical and research focus is on obesity and stigma. Suggestions from these experts include first recognizing that weight bias exists even among pediatric health care providers [20]. Additionally, language must be very carefully considered. Puhl et al. [20] offer the practical and sensitive suggestion to ask the patient and family about preferred words or terms in discussions about weight-related health Third, like other health care professionals, we would benefit from a greater understanding of the complexity of obesity and the “potential benefits and disadvantages of introducing weight-management discussions with patients” [14](p865). Certainly, there will be times when weight-related discussions would be contraindicated by the patient’s and/or family’s psychological or emotional state. However, when weight needs to be raised in relation to a child’s chronic pain, it may be best received in the context of health implications. Obesity is a multifactorial disease with strong genetic contributions. It is also associated with systemic inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, as well as chronic pain. In fact, most are unaware that obesity is a risk factor for migraines in pediatric populations. That said, weight-related health or weight-related pain discussions cannot focus entirely on losing weight. For many, it is a struggle to change their weight status, and even if it is possible, this process takes time. We must not ignore managing pain while we wait for possible weight reduction. CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT Item #2 Our second one today is called “Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Intervention in Individuals with Fibromyalgia” by Curtis et. al.(K Curtis 2021)  and published in Pain Medicine in June of 2021…….pork chops and apple sauce.  Why They Did It To evaluate the feasibility and safety of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). How They Did It
  • A total of 17 patients completed the study
  • A cohort study with a delayed treatment arm used as a comparator.
  • Hyperbaric Medicine Unit, Toronto General Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
  • Eighteen patients diagnosed with FM according to the American College of Rheumatology and a score ≥60 on the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire.
  • Participants were randomized to receive immediate HBOT intervention (n = 9) or HBOT after a 12-week waiting period
  • HBOT was delivered at 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres per session, 5 days per week, for 8 weeks
  • Both groups were assessed at baseline, after HBOT intervention, and at 3 months’ follow-up.
What They Found
  • HBOT-related adverse events included mild middle-ear barotrauma in three patients and new-onset myopia in four patients
  • The efficacy of HBOT was evident in most of the outcomes in both groups
  • This improvement was sustained at 3-month follow-up assessment.
Wrap It Up HBOT appears to be feasible and safe for individuals with FM. It is also associated with improved global functioning, reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression, and improved quality of sleep that was sustained at 3-month follow-up assessment. I don’ tank about you but I’m not going to go out and buy an oxygen chamber this afternoon but, it’s interesting and I’ve always heard positive things about them so this one peaked my interest a bit. I figured it would with you as well.  Item #3 The last one is called “A Healing Journey with Chronic Pain: A Meta-Ethnography Synthesizing 195 Qualitative Studies” by Toye et. al. and also published in Pain Medicine in June of 2021….Smoke show!! You know, it’s almost like I got an email from Pain Medicine last week highlighting some of their newest research in their June edition. Weird how all of these articles were all in the same month and in the same episode here. Right? Why They Did It There is a large body of research exploring what it means for a person to live with chronic pain. However, existing research does not help us understand what it means to recover. We aimed to identify qualitative research that explored the experience of living with chronic pain published since 2012 and to understand the process of recovery. How They Did It
  • A synthesis of qualitative research using meta-ethnography.
  • We used the seven stages of meta-ethnography. 
  • We systematically searched for qualitative research, published since 2012, that explored adults’ experiences of living with, and being treated for, chronic pain. 
  • We used constant comparison to distill the essence of ideas into themes and developed a conceptual model.
  • We screened 1,328 titles and included 195 studies.
Wrap It Up The innovation of our study is to conceptualize healing as an ongoing and iterating journey rather than a destination. Health interventions for chronic pain would usefully focus on validating pain through meaningful and acceptable explanations; validating patients by listening to and valuing their stories; encouraging patients to connect with a meaningful sense of self, to be kind to themselves, and to explore new possibilities for the future; and facilitating safe reconnection with the social world. This could make a real difference to people living with chronic pain who are on their own healing journeys. Alright, that’s it. Keep on keepin’ on. Keep changing our profession from your corner of the world. The world needs evidence-based, patient-centered practitioners driving the bus so get active, get involved, and make it happen. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.  Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg
The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health! Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic! Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference.  Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. Website
Home
Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/ Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/ Twitter YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2 Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/ About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger Bibliography
  • K Curtis, P., J Katz, PhD, C Djaiani, BSc, G O’Leary, MD, FRCPC, J Uehling, MS, CCRP, J Carroll, BHA, D Santa Mina, PhD, H Clarke, MD, PhD, FRCPC, M Gofeld, MD, PhD, FRCPC, R Katznelson, MD, FRCPC, (2021). “Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Intervention in Individuals with Fibromyalgia.” Pain Med 22(6): 1324-1332.
  • Keri R Hainsworth, P., Monica L Gremillion, PhD, W Hobart Davies, PhD, Stacy C Stolzman, PT, MPT, PhD, Steven J Weisman, MD, (2021). “Obesity in Youth with Chronic Pain: Giving It the Seriousness It Deserves.” Pain Med 22(6): 1243-1245.
       

Western Diet Hurts and Acupuncture

 CF 186: Western Diet Hurts and Acupuncture Today we’re going to talk about new research based on chronic pain and our regular Western diet. Then we discuss  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

  OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #186 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about high impact chronic pain and we talked about newer research on the use of cannabinoids in adolescence. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

I’m feeling pretty good today, folks. I’m feeling pretty optimistic. If I had known what a process building a medical clinic truly is, I may have thought it through just a little bit more than I did. There really is a solid reason more chiropractors don’t take the steps to do it. And that’s because it isn’t easy.  Attorneys, medical directors, hiring the nurse pracs, setting up training, getting the malpractice in place, getting the DEA number of the medical director to have your address on it so your NP can order the things they need, getting your NP credentialed, getting the entities created correctly by the CPAs……it’s a process for damn sure. 

I remember when I started this path, my good buddy and consultant on it, Dr. Tyce Hergert in Southlake, TX, he told me get your seatbelt on because the majority of the work is in the first 90 days. I feel like it’s starting to loosen up a bit and the clouds are clearing on this integration deal. Which is exciting. Because then you can go from wading through the paperwork and minutiae and start focusing on their training and growing the word of mouth and actually start working on the business. That’s where my skill level lies.  I’m not 100% out of the initial struggle to get it set up and off the ground but I’m getting toward the rear end of it and that’s encouraging. For instance, my morning this morning was setting up an account with a medical supplies company and getting started with my first order of IV equipment, cotton swabs, medipore tape, and things of that nature.  Right…..I know…..ugh.

But it’ll be worth it eventually. At least it damn sure better be! Beyond that, last week was better as far as clinic numbers. Moving in the right direction. I believe as a solo practitioner I had about 167. Still not pre-COVID numbers but not awful. I can deal with stuff mentally when I know it’s moving the right direction. It’s when it’s staying slim and there’s no longer rhyme or reason for it that makes me lose my mind. 

So, the mind is intact today and I’m looking forward. Onward and upward today.  Still no emails from any of you on what you’ve done to help the rest of you get your patients back. So, any help and advice from the think tank here would be good for the rest of the crew. Share. Give. It’ good for you. 

Item #1

This first one his an article that appeared in the Seattle Times called “Study finds correlation between high-fat Western diet and pain” by Theresa Braine of the New York Daily News (Braine 2021). It was published on June 24, 2021 and it’s hotter than hot stuff! And on a side note, You’d be in a hell of an awkward position if you last name was Braine but you were an idiot wouldn’t you? Think about that a minute. Your name is brain but you’re basically walking around bumping into walls…..people snickering behind your back…..Brain….right, right.  Anyway, that’s a little peak into my brain for you.

Anyway…since it’s an article, as always I just basically summarize and hit the high spots. 

  • They say the Western diet is associate with many ills and now chronic pain might be added to the list. 
  • A new study looks at the potential for omega-6 fats’ influence on neuropathic pain in people with diabetes and other conditions.
  • Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio studied the effects of omega-6 fatty acids themselves by measuring the role of these dietary lipids in pain conditions and found that the substances themselves seem to cause pain and inflammation.
  • Diabetes, autoimmune disorders and cardiovascular diseases are known to be affected by nutritional choices, the researchers said. But excessive consumption of omega-6 fats, which are found largely in commonly consumed processed foods, had not been studied in terms of the acids themselves and their role specifically in pain.
  • They studied polyunsaturated fatty acids in both mice and humans.
  • The five-year study was published in the June edition of the journal Nature Metabolism.
  • Omega-6 fats mainly occur in foods with vegetable oils
  • “But Western diets associated with obesity are characterized by much-higher levels of those acids in foods from corn chips to onion rings, than healthy omega-3 fats, which are found in fish and sources like flaxseed and walnuts,” the researchers’ statement said. “Generally, unhealthy foods high in omega-6 fats include processed snacks, fast foods, cakes, and fatty and cured meats, among others.”
  • Reversing those dietary habits and increasing omega-3 fats “greatly reduced these pain conditions,” the researchers found. “Also, the authors demonstrated that skin levels of omega-6 lipids in patients with Type 2 diabetic neuropathic pain were strongly associated with reported pain levels and the need for taking analgesic drugs.”

So, we’re seeing more and more studies like this talking about inflammatory diets, high-fat, and things of that nature. All being related to increased levels of pain. This is something chiropractors can get behind. I can be very honest when I say that the main gap missing in my clinic is weight loss. Diet and nutrition. Things of that nature. As a result, I’m having our nurse practitioner trained in medical weight loss so we can fill that gap and be well-rounded. 

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #2

Next up, I’ve been asked to put together a talk based on evidence-based, patient-centered practice and what makes it the future of our profession. The special request was to end the talk with some research-based around acupuncture research. Texas chiropractors continue to go through battles and one of them is against the acupuncturists in the state.  So, with that, I’m going to offer up a couple of papers. I’ve got a bunch of good ones but thought I’d just cover a couple here. The first one is called “Clinical Evidence for Association of Acupuncture and Acupressure With Improved Cancer Pain A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” by He et. al. (He Y 2019) and published in JAMA Oncology on December 19, 2019 and it goes a little sumpin’ like this. 

The first thing that jumps out here, especially for those somewhat new to reading through research, is that this is a systematic review and meta-analysis. That is at the top of the research pyramid. For example simple little case studies and animal studies, pilot studies….things of that nature….they live at the bottom, less meaningful or less impactful part of the pyramid. As you climb the pyramid to the more important stuff, you’ll see cohort studies and randomized controlled trials. Then, at the very top, the most meaningful studies are the systematic reviews topped off by the meta-analysis.  What I’m saying is that this paper is good stuff. It’s good information. And it appears in a very respected journal. The Journal of the American Medical Association’s Oncology branch. It’s high level from several aspects.  

Why They Did It

The authors wanted to answer the question, “Is the use of acupuncture and acupressure associated with improved cancer pain management compared with sham intervention and/or analgesic therapy alone?

How They Did It

  • It was a systematic review of 17 randomized clinical trials and meta-analysis of 14 trials in the current English-language and Chinese-language literature
  • Three English-language databases and 4 Chinese-language biomedical databases were searched for RCTs published from database inception through March 31, 2019.
  • Randomized clinical trials that compared acupuncture and acupressure with a sham control, analgesic therapy, or usual care for managing cancer pain were included.
  • The quality of RCTs was appraised with the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool
  • The primary outcome was pain intensity measured by the Brief Pain Inventory, Numerical Rating Scale, Visual Analog Scale, or Verbal Rating Scale.

What They Found

A significant association was found between real (compared with sham) acupuncture and reduced pain, and acupuncture combined with analgesic therapy was associated with decreased analgesic use. However, heterogeneity lowered the level of certainty of the evidence.

Wrap It Up

This study found a moderate level of evidence that acupuncture and/or acupressure was significantly associated with lower pain intensity in patients with cancer compared with a sham control, which suggests a potential for a combination of acupuncture and acupressure to help reduce opioid doses in patients with cancer.

Item #3

This last one is called “Acupuncture for neck disorders (Review for The Cochrane Collaboration)” by Trinh et. al. (Trinh K 2016) and it can be found in the Cochrane Library published in May of 2016 so it’s about 5 years old at this point. 

Why They Did It

  • Acupuncture has been used as an alternative to more conventional treatment for musculoskeletal pain. This review summarises the most current scientific evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute, subacute and chronic neck pain.
  • To determine the effects of acupuncture for adults with neck pain, with focus on pain relief, disability or functional measures, patient satisfaction and global perceived effect.

How They Did It

  • They searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Manual, Alternative and Natural Therapy Index System (MANTIS), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) from their beginning to August 2015
  • They searched reference lists, two trial registers and the acupuncture database Traditional Chinese Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (TCMLARS) in China to 2005.
  • We included published trials that used random assignment to intervention groups, in full text or abstract form. We excluded quasi-randomized controlled trials 
  • Of the 27 included studies, three represented individuals with whiplash‐associated disorders (WADs) ranging from acute to chronic (205 participants), five explored chronic myofascial neck pain (186 participants), five chronic pain due to arthritic changes (542 participants), six chronic non‐specific neck pain (4011 participants), two neck pain with radicular signs (43 participants) and six subacute or chronic mechanical neck pain (5111 participants). So there was a big mix of conditions represented with a solid sample size when you add them all up. 

What They Found

  • For mechanical neck pain, we found that acupuncture is beneficial at immediate‐term follow‐up compared with sham acupuncture for pain intensity; at short‐term follow‐up compared with sham or inactive treatment for pain intensity; at short‐term follow‐up compared with sham treatment for disability; and at short‐term follow‐up compared with wait‐list control for pain intensity and neck disability improvement.
  • This effect does not seem sustainable over the long term. Whether subsequent repeated sessions would be successful was not examined by investigators in our primary studies.

Wrap It Up

Moderate‐quality evidence suggests that acupuncture relieves pain better than sham acupuncture, as measured at completion of treatment and at short‐term follow‐up, and that those who received acupuncture report less pain and disability at short‐term follow‐up than those on a wait‐list. Moderate‐quality evidence also indicates that acupuncture is more effective than inactive treatment for relieving pain at short‐term follow‐up. Alright, for those not yet on the acupuncture train, take another look.

The VA here locally are sending veterans to us right now for our acupuncturist to work with them and these old grizzly vets absolutely love it. Yep, that’s anecdotal as hell but I’m telling you, there’s something to it and research seems to be catching up to it.  Patients ask me how it works and I have to be honest……I’m not sure. I have some guesses but it’s a lot like a damn TV. I can’t tell you the exact way a program’s signal gets to my house and shows up when I turn the damn TV on. But I know how to enjoy the results.  Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B096RST3WW

 

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

  The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disabilities and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

  • Braine, T. (2021). Study finds correlation between high-fat Western diet and pain. Seattle Times.
  • He Y, G. X., May BH, (2019). “Clinical Evidence for Association of Acupuncture and Acupressure With Improved Cancer Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” JAMA Oncol 6(2): 271-278.
  • Trinh K, G. N., Irnich D, Cameron ID, Forget M (2016). “Acupuncture for neck disorders. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2016,.” Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 5.

 

Factors Leading To Surgery For Some Discs & Disc Innervation

CF 183: Factors Leading To Surgery For Some Discs & Disc Innervation

Today we’re going to talk about the innervation of the disc and we’re going to talk about some factors that can lead to surgery for lumbar disc herniations.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

 

 

Purchase Dr. Williams book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #183 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about Adjustments as immune boosters and we talked about pain. Is it mind or is it matter? Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

It’s been a bit of a whirlwind these last few weeks.  I’ve talked a little more recently about launching my very first book. It’s out. It’s available on Amazon. It’s called The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research. And I’d love for you to go pick up a copy for yourself. You can get either ebook or a paperback sent to your front door. Your call.  Here’s why I think you need it. All of the research we talk about here and lots before I started the podcast, has been categorized for you into conditions and body regions. So, if you need some research on neck pain, flip to the section and there you go. Migraines? SI joint issues? Go to those sections and there you go.  This comes in handy when you have a talk to give and don’t have the time to go searching through pubmed all day.

Or when a patient asks you a question on something specific. Or a host of any other reasons. It’s a reference for your practice for your education, patient education, and community education.  So go grab that up while you’re thinking about it. 

As mentioned in a previous episode, we visited New Orleans, Then we were home for one weekend. Then the next weekend we were off to Dallas for the Texas Chiropractic Association’s ChiroTexpo event which is our state’s convention basically.  Two board of directors meetings for me plus some networking, classes, and problem-solving. Essentially. 

I have seen him speak before. I went to Forward 19 in St Louis before the Rona came along and saw Brett Winchester talk. We had him in Dallas at this event and he did not disappoint. I was able to better connect with Brett here in Texas. We will absolutely have him on a future podcast and in the meantime, if you want to learn more about Dr. Winchester, check out his podcast at Gestaldt Podcast.  The dude is sharper than a tack, has worked with the St. Louis Cardinals, and is one of those on the top and on the edge so check him out if you’re smart. 

Then, even though Dr. Kevin Christie was already a friend, we really got to hang out and shoot the proverbial shoo shoo in Dallas, along with Dr. Winchester. And it was just a good time had by all. 

I used to be lone wolf, folks. I used to not care about the profession. I just cared about my office, my numbers, my business. Me, me, me. I got a bit shamed into joining the TCA. Then, they had a vacancy on the Board of Directors due to the director in my district having cancer. Well, how can you say no? I was thrown into the fire with no context, no history, no experience, and little idea of what to say or how to act. But I was thrown in with a group of about 20 people that lead the profession and develop leaders from scratch. That’s what they did for me. We got there. We made it happen. 

Fast forward about a decade or so and I was on the Board of Directors for about 5 years, been the Chiropractic Development Initiative Chair, served as the Public Relations Chair, and am now going into the second year as the Department Coordinator for Scientific Affairs. I help steer the speakers we have at our events among other things. 

Associations need your membership dollars and you need to be members. But that’s just a mostly passive notion. The REAL benefit is realized when one becomes active and plugged into the association. Meaning, through being active and involved at just about every step, I have developed a network of close friends and colleagues from around the entire state of Texas that, even though some practice differently than I, would still go to bat for me, support me, and back me. And I them. 

We have developed brothers and sisters, camaraderie, and family with each other. I cannot begin to share with you how many times I’ve had questions or issues that I was able to just call up one of my TCA buddies and get a solid answer for it.  This medical integration I’m going through right now. Do you think I just up and decided to do it and jumped into the fire? Hell no.

I called all of my TCA buddies who have done it previously.  One is now my consultant on it. The attorney that wrote the law that allows for this integration is TCA’s lobby team. He’s the one that has created the paperwork and contracts for me.  Literally, none of what I am today is possible to the degree it’s been possible if not for being active, plugged in, and a solid member of the TCA leadership. 

I don’t say this to brag that I’m active or brag about my positions in the TCA or to boast in any way. I say this to let you know that there is a difference between being a member and being an active member. Between building something larger than yourself and your own practice and doing your own small thing. Between being an influential leader and being a bench warmer.  Get into the game. Raise your hand. You can thank me later.

Our profession needs evidence-based, patient-centered leaders like you. Don’t bitch about our profession if you’re not willing to step in and do something to change it. 

Item #1

This one is called “Factors Associated With Progression to Surgical Intervention for Lumbar Disc Herniation in the Military Health System” by Anderson et. al. [1] and published in Spine Journal on March 15, 2021 which means it’s got the hot spread all over it. 

Why They Did It

To determine surgery-free survival of patients receiving conservative management of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in the military healthcare system (MHS) and risk factors for surgical intervention

How They Did It

  • The Military Data Repository was queried for all patients diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation from 2011-2018
  • Follow-up time to surgical intervention was defined as the time from diagnosis to first encounter for lumbar microdiscectomy or lumbar decompression in either a military treatment facility or in the civilian sector. 
  • The Military Data Repository was also queried for history of tobacco use at any time during military healthcare system care, age at the time of diagnosis, sex, military healthcare system beneficiary category, and diagnosing facility characteristics. 
  • Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the associations of patient and diagnosing facility characteristics with time to surgical intervention.
  • A total of 84,985 military healthcare system beneficiaries including 62,771 active duty service members were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation in a military treatment facility during the 8-year study period. 
  • A total of 10,532 (12.4%) military healthcare system beneficiaries failed conservative management onto surgical intervention with lumbar microdiscectomy or lumbar decompression. 

What They Found

Among all healthcare beneficiaries, several patient-level (younger age, male sex, and history of tobacco use) and facility-level characteristics (hospital vs. clinic and surgical care vs. primary care clinic) were independently associated with a higher risk of surgical intervention.

Wrap It Up

Lumbar disc herniation compromises military readiness and negatively impacts healthcare costs. military healthcare system beneficiaries with lumbar disc herniation have a good prognosis with approximately 88% of patients successfully completing conservative management. However, strategies to improve outcomes of conservative management in lumbar disc herniation should address risks associated with both patient and facility characteristics.

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #2 Our last one today is called “Innervation of the Human Intervertebral Disc: A Scoping Review” by Groh et. al. [2] and published in Pain Medicine in June of 2021 and that’s current hot. As in present-day, burning up the face of the Earth as we speak, hot. 

Why They Did It

Changes to the intervertebral disc (IVD) have been associated with back pain, leading many to postulate that the IVD may be a direct source of pain, typically referred to as discogenic back pain. Yet despite decades of research into the neuroanatomy of the IVD, there is a lack of consensus in the literature as to the distribution and function of neural elements within the tissue. The current scoping review provides a comprehensive systematic overview of studies that document the topography, morphology, and immunoreactivity of neural elements within the IVD in humans.

How They Did It

Articles were retrieved from six separate databases in a three-step systematic search and were independently evaluated by two reviewers.

What They Found

Three categories of neural elements were described within the IVD: perivascular nerves, sensory nerves independent of blood vessels, and mechanoreceptors. Nerves were consistently localized within the outer layers of the annulus fibrosus. Neural ingrowth into the inner annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus was found to occur only in degenerative and disease states.

Wrap It Up

While the pattern of innervation within the IVD is clear, the specific topographic arrangement and function of neural elements in the context of back pain remain unclear. I mostly included this because, in our Neuromusculoskeletal Diplomate program, they were clear about the innervation encroaching into a disc injury and how that makes re-injury somewhat easier and sometimes more painful. Because the nerves are further into the structure of the disc once the injury has occurred and then subsequently resolved.  Very interesting stuff.  That’s all I have the time for today folks. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.  Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

 

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website https://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter https://twitter.com/Chiro_Forward

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

1. Anderson AB, B.M., Pisano AJ, Watson NI, Dickens JF, Helgeson MD, Brooks DI, Wagner SC,, Factors Associated With Progression to Surgical Intervention for Lumbar Disc Herniation in the Military Health System. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 2021. 46(6): p. E392-E397.

2. Adam M R Groh, M., Dale E Fournier, MSc, Michele C Battié, PhD, Cheryle A Séguin, PhD,, Innervation of the Human Intervertebral Disc: A Scoping Review. Pain Med, 2021. 22(6): p. 1281-1304.

Car Crashes and Research To Go Along With It (Part Two)

CF 176: Car Crashes and Research To Go Along With It (Part Two) Today we’re going to continue to talk about car wreck research. It’s good stuff and useful for all clinics and docs that deal with personal injury patients.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg
OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 
  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 
You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #176 Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about Car crashes and awesome research around that topic. Part one I guess. Today’s episode is pretty much part two. So, make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class.  On the personal end of things….. On the personal side of things, we are still going down the path towards having the medical entity completed. I made a hire that I feel confident in. The nurse practitioner was referred to me by another nurse practitioner here in town who was his preceptor or teacher for his clinical hours when he was going through school. She told me that he is super smart, excellent with patients, eager to learn, and his wife is an amazing cook. So I was sold. And just taking the time to get to know him, I’m even more confident that I have made a good decision going forward. The majority of the work on this is going to be in the first 3 to 6 months I think. We have to get systems in place, I have to teach the nurse practitioner the exam I do. How do you teach somebody how to do the exam that an ortho fellowship practitioner does? Well, we shall find out.  I’ve already loaned him one of my dr. Stuart McGill books to get started on. I’ve been sharing with him a lot of the information that I learned in the Neuromusculoskeletal program, I’ve talked to him about McKenzie protocols and migrating the disc, and started him on the path of different ways to think of chronic pain. Including the up-regulated and sensitized central nervous system as well as the biopsychosocial aspect of chronic pain. Yellow flags, words matter, limiting MRIs, and all of the associated Tom Foolery.   He was unfamiliar with quite a bit of what I have been teaching him and showing him. But very receptive and very interested in learning about that side of pain and newer ways of thinking about it and approaching it. I think we’re going to be a great team.  Outside of that part of my life, I’ve started with the book launch. Not really the launch itself as much as getting the book ready for launch and putting together a launch team. What does a launch tram do exactly? Well, let me tell you. Basically, I’m going to be uploading it to Amazon once it’s formatted for it and everything is in place. Then, it’ll be free for the first 3 days. That’s when everyone on my launch team will go download it. Then, leave a review for it…..because my launch team is cool and they know that’s part of the launch process.  The free downloads and the Amazon book reviews give the book a little Amazon juice which will propel it up the charts a bit. That way, when the initial 3 days are over, and I can start charging money for it, the Amazon Juice has it set up for success and sales.  So, that’s the plan and guess what?? I’d love it if you regular listeners would like to be on my launch team. If so, just send me an email to [email protected] and make sure you tell me you’re on the launch team. It’s that easy. Or, send me a message through our Facebook group or the Facebook page or through smoke signal.  Whatever means you can get me a message that you want to help us, that’ll work for me.  It would be rude of me to not thank a couple of folks. I need to thank Dr. Chris Howson and Dr. Steven Roffers for helping me with the editing process. Dr. Howson is the inventor of the Drop Release tool, he’s smarter than hell, and he’s a good person on top of all of that. Go check out the Drop Release tool and show Dr. Howson some love won’t you? Dr. Roffers is the group admin of the Facebook group called Chiropractic Research Alliance with over 8,000 members, he’s a certified medical editor and serves on the editorial boards of 14 journals. Dr. Roffers offered to help me edit the draft as well.  So, these two pros need to be thanked and properly recognized for their efforts and their generosity. I appreciate you two and just appreciate you.  I honestly thought I’d ask for launch team members and there’d be crickets. In the first post I made on my Facebook properties, I’ve now got about 25 super awesome people that want to help support and promote the project. And in the process, they’re supporting and promoting evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.  It’s a win-win and I thank you all. More to come as I get further down the road.  Now, on with the research.  CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT As I mentioned last week, this podcast episode was inspired by a recent episode of the Chiropractic Science podcast hosted by Dean Smith. It was episode number 55.  His guest was Dr. Michael Freeman who I talked about in last week’s episode. These papers are papers they talked about on that episode so, if you want it from the horse’s mouth, go over to Chiropractic Science and find the recent episode with Dr. Michael Freeman and hit play. Then come back here and get my take on it.  Now let me pause just a second and say that if you haven’t jumped into personal injury, don’t. Unless you plan on getting the education it takes to do a good job. Take courses. Make yourself the expert. Know your worth. It pays well but the stakes are high for your patients. You have to deal with attorneys. You might have to testify under oath in court. Do you REALLY want to do that if you’re education and experience are not up to snuff? When I jumped in back in 2007, I had a basic Chiro education but I was not specialized in car wrecks or whiplash. I could have been better. So I made myself better. I recognized my shortfalls and I filled the gaps. I got the Advanced Certification in whiplash biomechanics and Traumatology through the SPINE Institute out in San Diego, CA. I got the certification from the Personal Injury Institute through Matthew DeGaetano who was also a Croft Commando.  I have attended CE hours on PI specifically. I ended up compiling all of the experience and education into a macro for ChiroTouch. If you want to check that out, go to personalinjurymacro.com but you’re not going to want to buy it unless you’re using ChiroTouch. It’s like gold though if you have ChiroTouch.  It’s got all of the Croft stuff in there, the research citations, crash descriptions, risk assessments, the whole thing. Plus all of my customization after I went through the Fellowship for the Neuromusculoskeletal program. IT’s gold, folks.  Anyway, my point was that you do your reputation and you do your patients a disservice if you are in the PI arena but you don’t know what the hell you’re doing. Plain and simple. It’s lucrative but dammit, get educated or get out. And understand that you’re not going to get 100% on every case.  To demonstrate my point, as I said, I’m a specialist now with the Fellowship, I have the cert in whiplash biomechanics and Traumatology, and I’ve been recognized as an expert in whiplash at the District Court level. Because of my macros I created, I can make narrative reports that nobody I’ve met can beat.  And YET…..I still don’t get 100% of my bills. Don’t think you’re going to get 100% either.  Because that’s the way PI works. Not all cases are created equally. Some fall apart completely. Some attorneys are truly awful people so stay on your toes. Some are amazing people and those are the ones you want to work with. Sometimes, the patient disappears. Sometimes they get in trouble and go to jail. Sometimes the insurance company just won’t budge and the attorney doesn’t feel there’s a strong enough case to go to court on.  At those times, you better be willing to wheel and deal. Otherwise, you might get that one bill paid but that attorney won’t be sending you any more clients and guess what? Attorneys talk to each all of the time. They’re mostly all good friends.  Some of my best friends professionally are attorneys. Some of my biggest enemies professionally through the years have been attorneys. One still owes me $42,000 and I don’t expect I’ll ever get it out of him because he’s a worthless, useless, terrible human being. But, it’s part of the dangers of swimming in this particular lake. Some of the fish have no souls.  But again, some are amazing people that I have forged solid friendships with.  I went off the rails a bit there but the point again is this; either get educated and do it at a high level or leave it to others that did actually put the work in to get the extra education. Plain and simple.  Item #1 Our first paper is called, “A systematic approach to clinical determinations of causation in symptomatic spinal disk injury following motor vehicle crash trauma”’ by Dr. Michael Freeman, et. al. (Freeman MD 2009)  and published in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation back in 2008.  Why They Did It This is a really long description of the objective here so follow along and we’ll discuss, “Clinical determinations of causation in cases of intervertebral disk (IVD) injury after a motor vehicle crash (MVC) are often disputed in court settings.  No published systematic guidelines exist for making such determinations. This has resulted in nonclinical people determine injury causation and performing the evaluations. This is traditionally a clinical activity.  The result is causal determinations that are potentially disconnected from clinical observations of injury. Meaning, when non-clinical people are doing the evaluation, they get it wrong a lot.  The purpose of this review was to evaluate the current literature on causation, causal determinations after trauma and intervertebral disk injury after a motor vehicle crash, and to develop a practicable, logical, and literature-based approach to causation determinations of symptomatic intervertebral disk injury after a motor vehicle crash. That was almost all quoted from the paper’s abstract but I tried to make it even more basic and less confusing.  What They Found
  • The results of the review indicate IVD injury can result from any MVC regardless of magnitude, thus meeting the first criteria of causation, biologic plausibility.
  • Individual determinations of causation depend entirely on the temporal association between the collision and the symptom onset (the second criterion) and a lack of a more probable explanation for the symptoms (the third).
  • When these causal elements are met, clinicians can assert causation on a “more probable than not” or “reasonable probability” basis.
  • You may have heard me mention I’m currently undergoing the Forensics Diplomate program right now. That is legal speak there. Probably meaning ‘greater than a 50% chance.”
Wrap It Up For the conclusion, they say, “Because of a lack of an established or reliable relationship between collision force and the probability of IVD injury the investigation of collision parameters is not a useful adjunct to causal determinations.” Item #2 Our last one today is called “Diagnostic Accuracy of Videofluoroscopy for Symptomatic Cervical Spine Injury Following Whiplash Trauma” by Freeman et. al. (Freeman MD 2020) and published in the International Journal Of Environmental Research and Public Health in 2020 and that’s still got some smoke! Now….if you don’t know, what is Videofluoroscopic examination? It’s basically x-rays (and video) that are dynamic. X-rays that are moving. So you can see the patient go into cervical flexion. It’s cool as hell. But you can accurately see when there is ligament injury or ligament laxity as well because in real time, you can observe the one vertebra slide forward on the one under. It’s crazy and a bit spooky.  When you see one vertebra slip forward on the one underneath as the patient goes into cervical flexion, it’ll make you anxious in your belly. It might make you pee a little. Anyway, look it up. See if you can find some videos through your Google machine.  Why They Did It Intervertebral instability is a relatively common finding among patients with chronic neck pain after whiplash trauma. Videofluoroscopy (VF) of the cervical spine is a potentially sensitive diagnostic tool for evaluating instability, as it offers the ability to examine relative intervertebral movement over time, and across the entire continuum of voluntary movement of the patient. At the present time, there are no studies of the diagnostic accuracy of Videofluoroscopy for discriminating between injured and uninjured populations. How They Did It
  • Symptomatic (injured) study subjects were recruited from consecutive patients with chronic (>6 weeks) post-whiplash pain presenting to medical and chiropractic offices equipped with Videofluoroscopy facilities.
  • Asymptomatic (uninjured) volunteers were recruited from family and friends of patients. 
  • Three statistical models were utilized to assess the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of positive Videofluoroscopy findings to correctly discriminate between injured and uninjured subjects.
What They Found
  • A total of 196 subjects (119 injured, 77 uninjured) were included in the study.
  • Videofluoroscopic examination of the cervical spine provides a high degree of diagnostic accuracy for the identification of vertebral instability in patients with chronic pain stemming from whiplash trauma.
Wrap It Up “Videofluoroscopic examination of the cervical spine provides a high degree of diagnostic accuracy for the identification of vertebral instability in patients with chronic pain stemming from whiplash trauma.”     Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.    Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg
  The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!   Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!   Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference.    Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.   Website
Home
  Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/   Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/   Twitter     YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q   iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2   Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021   Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through   TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/   About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger   Bibliography Freeman MD, C. C., Kohles S, (2009). “A systematic approach to clinical determinations of causation in symptomatic spinal disk injury following motor vehicle crash trauma.” PM R. 1(10): 951-956.   Freeman MD, K. E., Rosa S, Gatterman B, Strommer E, Leith W, (2020). “Diagnostic Accuracy of Videofluoroscopy for Symptomatic Cervical Spine Injury Following Whiplash Trauma.” Int J Environ Res Public Health 17(5): 1693.  

Car Crashes And Awesome Research To Go Along With It

CF 175: Car Crashes And Awesome Research To Go Along With It Today we’re going to talk about car wreck research and it’s pretty cool. Especially if you treat PI patients and you ever find yourself testifying. I’m going to give you a couple of caveman clubs that you can use to figuratively bash a rabid attorney with.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music.

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #175 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about ow back disability and osteoarthritis research. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

We hired a nurse practitioner. I have to say that there are so many scary talented and scary smart people out there in the world, folks. We got to meet several of them while going through the interview process. If everyone comes out of school highly trained, it’s hard to use that as a measuring stick.  So, I fell back to my core need; which was to hire a good person. It wouldn’t be helpful to hire someone that would come in and feel superior to everyone else in the office. It wouldn’t be helpful to hire someone highly trained but they don’t treat my staff with respect and even love. That would kill office culture dead in its tracks and I like my office culture. 

I tease my staff. I tease my patients. They tease me back. I love the atmosphere. I don’t want to hire a stick in the mud. So I didn’t. When it comes down to it, you can train everything that needs to be trained. But you can’t make a miserable person a good person. You can’t make an introvert an extrovert. You can’t make someone that has a sense of entitlement into someone that is full of gratitude.  You just can’t do it. I think the one we hired is the closest of all that we interviewed to me and who I am and how I carry myself.

He’s new so there won’t be any bad habits. He’s eager to learn. I love that. I’m afraid I’m not the best teacher but we’re going to do it anyway! So, that’s my big news this week, the NP is on and this train is rolling down the tracks now.  Now, I’m going to tell you that here in Texas, masks are no longer mandated. Not even in the schools. So, as you might imagine, if COVID were still a huge concern here, there would be people piling up in the hospitals.

There aren’t. In fact, your hospital load just continues to dwindle. We are in an area of about 275,000 people or so. And the last number I saw last week was that we added 15 new cases that day.  That’s with kids going to school and interacting with each other. In BIG schools. When you go to a restaurant, the places are packed with people. I’m telling you, here in Texas, there is no ‘new normal’. There is the old normal.

You’d never even know that anything was ever different for a year, honestly.  Yet, numbers are continuing to go down. So, why are other states back on the rise? What does it all mean? Has Texas reached herd immunity through infections and vaccines? Maybe. Texas has been a problem state for COVID for months until more recently.  I don’t know all of the answers. But what I feel is that the states that are still on serious lockdown are doing their population an injustice when you compare them to Texas. If their kids aren’t in school, they should be. They’re doing more damage than good from what I can tell. At this point anyway. 

Trust me, I’ve been all about being safe and smart and taking care of each other. Especially those most at risk. But, at this point, everyone that wants to be vaccinated in my area is vaccinated. At this point, in my state, if you get sick, it’s because you chose to risk it. Plain and simple.  Alright, let’s dive in. But first, I want to drop in a word about our amazing sponsors and give you a way to save a little money. 

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

This podcast episode was inspired by a recent episode of the Chiropractic Science podcast hosted by Dean Smith. His guest was Dr. Michael Freeman who I’ll talk about here in just a minute. These papers are papers they talked about on that episode so, if you want it from the horse’s mouth, go over to Chiropractic Science and find the recent episode with Dr. Michael Freeman and hit play. Then come back here and get my take on it. 

Item #1

This one is called “Is Acceleration a Valid Proxy for Injury Risk in Minimal Damage Traffic Crashes? A Comparative Review of Volunteer, ADL and Real-World Studies” by Nolet, et. al. (Nolet PS 2021) published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health in March of 2021 and I can’t even….wouldn’t even try to touch it…..

Why They Did It

Let me preface this by saying that Dr. Michael Freeman is an author on this paper and he’s just a phenomenal asset to chiropractic, health in general, and personal injury research. If you aren’t familiar with Dr. Freeman, we’re talking about the fact that he’s a DC, an MD, and Ph.D. and a whole bunch of other stuff one single person has any business being.  Also on this paper is Dr. Art Croft. I have the advanced certification through Dr. Croft’s SPINE Institute in San Diego and I have to tell you that he’s one of the most impressive individuals I’ve ever personally met.  In the paper, they say, “Injury claims associated with minimal damage rear impact traffic crashes are often defended using a “biomechanical approach,” in which the occupant forces of the crash are compared to the forces of activities of daily living (ADLs), resulting in the conclusion that the risk of injury from the crash is the same as for ADLs.” 

To put that in me and you talk…..what they’re saying is that it’s common in court for attorneys to say that being in a 5mph low-speed rear impact is similar in force to just stepping off of a sidewalk curb. Or some other ridiculous analogy like that.  They go on to say, “The purpose of the present investigation is to evaluate the scientific validity of the central operating premise of the biomechanical approach to injury causation; that occupant acceleration is a scientifically valid proxy for injury risk.”

To put that in me and you talk…..they just want to see if common every day events are truly like a low-speed rear impact car wreck. 

How They Did It

  • Data were abstracted, pooled, and compared from three categories of published literature: 
      1. Volunteer rear-impact crash testing studies, 
      2. ADL studies, and 
      3. Observational studies of real-world rear impacts. 
    • We compared the occupant accelerations of minimal or no damage (i.e., 3 to 11 kph speed change or “delta-V”) (2 mph up to 7 mph. ) rear-impact crash tests to the accelerations described in 6 of the most commonly reported ADLs in the reviewed studies. 
    • As a final step, the injury risk observed in real-world crashes was compared to the results of the pooled crash test and ADL analyses, controlling for delta-V.
    • OK in me and you speak, Delta V just means the change in speed that was experienced. Anytime you are in a wreck, you essentially go from one speed to another in a millisecond. That’s not conceptually, that’s literally. Delta V helps to describe that change in speed. 

What They Found

  • The results of the analyses indicated that average peak acceleration forces observed at the head during rear impact crash tests were typically at least several times greater than average forces observed during activities of daily living.
  • In contrast, the injury risk of real-world minimal damage rear impact crashes was estimated to be at least 2000 times greater than for any activities of daily living. So defense attorneys can stick that in their hat and smoke it up twice.

Wrap It Up

The results of our analysis indicate that the principle underlying the biomechanical injury causation approach, that occupant acceleration is a proxy for injury risk, is scientifically invalid. The biomechanical approach to injury causation in minimal damage crashes invariably results in the vast underestimation of the actual risk of such crashes and should be discontinued as it is a scientifically invalid practice. That also seems like a mic drop if the attorney pulls it out and uses it in a case. And should be appropriately accompanied by superhero comic noises like

Slap! Pow! Snap! Kazaam! Fwaaaap!! I love it.

Item #2

Item #2 is called “Estimating the number of traffic crash-related cervical spine injuries in the United States; An analysis and comparison of national crash and hospital data” by Michael Freeman and Wendy Leith (Freeman MD 2020) and published in Accident Analysis And Prevention in July of 2020 and that’s still got some steam to it. 

Why They Did It

In the intro, they say, “Cervical spine injury is a common result of traffic crashes, and such injuries range in severity from minor (i.e. sprain/strain) to moderate (intervertebral disk derangement) to serious and greater (fractures, dislocations, and spinal cord injuries). There are currently no reliable estimates of the number of crash-related spine injuries occurring in the US annually, although several publications have used national crash injury samples as a basis for estimating the frequency of both cervical and lumbar spinal disk injuries occurring in lower speed rear impact crashes.”

In me and you speak, they’re saying that many defense attorneys want to use estimates on neck injury and severity prevalence from national databases but it doesn’t make sense to do it that way and you can’t use these databases as a proper defense in a court case.  They say the purpose is, “To develop a reliable estimate of the number of various types of cervical spine injuries occurring in the US by comparing data from national crash injury to national hospital emergency departments and inpatient samples.”

Well, that makes sense to me….let’s see how it came out. 

How They Did It

Comparative cross-sectional METHODS: Cervical spine injury data were accessed, analyzed, and compared from 3 national databases; the 

    1. National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS), 
    2. Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), and the 
    3. Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS).

What They Found

  • It is estimated that there are approximately 869,000 traffic crash-related cervical spine injuries seen in hospitals in the US annually, including around 
      • 841,000 sprain/strain (whiplash) injuries, 
      • 2800 spinal disk injuries, 
      • 23,500 fractures, 
      • 2800 spinal cord injuries, and 
      • 1500 dislocations.
  • Because of highly restrictive inclusion criteria for both crash and injury types, as well as a very small sample size, the NASS-CDS underestimated all types of crash-related cervical spine injuries seen in US hospital emergency departments by 84 %
  • The injury type with the largest degree of underestimation in the NASS-CDS was cervical disk injuries, which were estimated at an 88 % lower frequency than in the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample
  • National insurance claim data, which include cases of cervical disk injury diagnosed both in and outside of the ED, indicate that the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample likely undercounts cervical disk injuries by 92 %, and thus the NASS-CDS correspondingly undercounts such injuries by 99 % or more.

Do you see why it’s so good to have people like Dr. Michael Freeman and Dr. Art Croft on our side? Holy smokes. Who else is out there putting attorneys in their place like these folks have done for years?

Wrap It Up

They end it by saying “Because of a limited sample size and restrictive criteria for both crash and injury inclusion, the NASS-CDS cannot be used to estimate the number of crash-related spinal injuries of any type or severity in the US. The most inappropriate use of the database is for estimating the number of spinal injuries resulting from low-speed rear impact collisions, as the NASS-CDS samples fewer than 1 in 100,000 of the cervical spine injuries of any type occurring in low-speed rear impact collisions.” Smack, Kowapow, Thunk! As I said, I love this kind of research. I remember Dr. Croft speaking about being an expert and attorneys starting to come at him and how he was able to just draw them out into deeper water before putting ‘em under!! I love it. 

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic! Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website https://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter https://twitter.com/Chiro_Forward

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger    

Bibliography

Freeman MD, L. W. (2020). “Estimating the number of traffic crash-related cervical spine injuries in the United States; An analysis and comparison of national crash and hospital data.” Accid Anal Prev 142(105571).  

Nolet PS, N. L., Kristman VL, Croft AC, Zeegers MP, Freeman MD, (2021). “Is Acceleration a Valid Proxy for Injury Risk in Minimal Damage Traffic Crashes? A Comparative Review of Volunteer, ADL and Real-World Studies.” Int J Environ Res Public Health 18(6): 2901.      

Useless Research & Insulin or Inflammation

CF 172: Useless Research & Insulin or Inflammation Today we’re going to talk about how I treat my staff, we’ll talk about insulin vs. inflammation, and we’ll talk about some trash research that came out in JAMA recently that you may wind up being confronted with at some point so listen up.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #172 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about going the way of the non-pharma world. If we could just get the the medical world to take a look at it. We also talked about insurance coverage trends and how they’re not very favorable to chiropractors. As you probably already feel. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

On the personal end of things, we’re still interviewing nurse practitioners and still getting our ducks in a row. We have the attorney that is setting up the medical entity meeting with our CPAs out in St. Louis to make sure it is set up in the most tax-advantageous as well as the most ideal legal way.  Any time you have your CPA and your attorney working together, you’re probably in a good place me thinks. I have a meeting with the medical director this week to go over what services he’s going to be OK with us offering. When appropriate, we’ll be looking at things like intra-joint injections, trigger point injections, low-level scripts but no narcotics.  Basically, anything we offer here will be very low risk. Not only because it inherently lowers our risk to adverse events, which makes me sleep better every night, but it also helps to keep a happy medical director. If it all works right, this is almost mailbox money for the medical director while providing an awesome gig for a nurse practitioner that is at least halfway motivated to build their practice. 

Think about it, nurses and nurse pracs are used to 12-hour shifts. They’ve missed important holidays and important events in their personal life due to having to work. Here, there are no weekends, there are not holidays spent working, vacation time, it’s all good in the hood at my place. Plus, they get to learn as much about orthopedics as they want to learn and a whole bunch they maybe don’t want to learn but is required to learn in order to work here.  That’s the deal though right?

Gotta pick the right NP because it all hinges on that one decision. Pick the wrong one and you’re out of business until you can get another hired. Doesn’t sound like a big deal until you factor in the 3 months it takes to get a new one credentialed. Speaking of, I have to get re-credentialed under the new medical entity. That’s because of Stark and anti-kickback laws.  This isn’t something to go into lightly. It’s like I said last week or two weeks ago here on the podcast, the wheels on this thing turn slowly and I’m OK with that. That way I don’t get out over my skis and lose control.  So, that’s where we’re at on that. 

Currently, I’m taking the opportunity to type this out on a Sunday afternoon. We are up at the office throwing a staff member her baby shower. No, I’m not a baby shower kind of dude as you may have guessed. I’m a Bud Light and guitars kind of guy. But, my wife decided we’re throwing our staff member a baby shower so here I am at the office recording this while the chicks and the hens are out there clucking and cackling. And I don’t mean that in a misogynist way. I mean it in a funny, playful kind of way so take it that way. 

It brought up a thought; do you treat your staff members like workers? Or do you treat them more like family? Right or wrong, as a result of my nature and my heart, we treat ours like family when appropriate. I’ve had staff ask me advice on deep dark stuff they were struggling with. I’ve had staff whose family was going to prison, the whole town knew, they were ashamed, and they just need some love, a little extra consideration, and a few big hugs. That one still gets me a little emotional when I think about it.  I’m going to give you a few more examples here but before I do, I don’t want you to misunderstand anything here. I’ve learned over the years that you cannot buy loyalty from your staff. They’re either with you every step of the way, or they are not. And that’s OK. Everyone is coming from different places, experiences, and motivations. Not a thing wrong with that.  But don’t do things for the wrong reasons. Don’t think you’re going to do a bunch of things for staff thinking it’ll ensure they stay with you forever. That’s just not reality and it’s a good way to allow yourself to get hurt on some level.  If you’re going to treat staff like family, you do it for all of the right reasons. Love, appreciation for them and their character, admiration for a job well done, team building, and things like that.  Getting back to it, I’ve sold a car to a staffer that was coming out of a bad relationship and had no transportation. I sold it to them for about $4,000 less than I could have gotten for it and let them pay it out $50 a paycheck and zero interest.  I’ve created a new, extra job for a staffer that was about to lose their house. It cost me an extra $1500/month for the following 2-3 years but that’s the way I am. 

I’ve sponsored kids sports for staffers more times than I can even start to recall.  In the end, money will come and go. It can be lost and it can be made. But it’s the relationships that stay with us.

Were we put on the planet just to make money and take care of our families? 

Or were we put on this planet to make ALL of our immediate relationships prosper and make the world, or at least our part of it, a better place?  You probably know where I come down on all that. It may sound a little hippy-dippy there, which I’m not at all, but I do see it that way. Money is nice and I see it as a challenge. A challenge to make it and see how much I can make ethically and morally. It’s fun to make money! But money really isn’t my main motivation any more.

I’m a huge stats person and track stuff like crazy. I balance my own bank statement every month. But I don’t count pennies anymore. I just don’t. I’m more into people, smiles, and all the good feels. Making people’s lives better when possible.  Alright, enough mushy stuff. 

Item #1 This first one today is called “Temporal Associations Among Body Mass Index, Fasting Insulin, and Systemic Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis” by Wiebe et. al. [1] and was published in JAMA on March 12, 2021 and that so hot it’s got my glasses all steamy. I can’t see a thing. 

Why They Did It The authors wanted to answer the question of “What are the temporal associations among higher body mass index (BMI) and chronic inflammation and/or hyperinsulinemia?” They say that Obesity is associated with a number of noncommunicable chronic diseases and is supposedly a cause of premature death. They wanted to summarize evidence on the temporality of the association between higher body mass index (BMI) and chronic inflammation and hyperinsulinemia.

How They Did It

  • MEDLINE (1946 to August 20, 2019) and Embase (from 1974 to August 19, 2019) were searched
  • The data analysis was conducted between January 2020 and October 2020.
  • Longitudinal studies and randomized clinical trials that measured fasting insulin level and/or an inflammation marker and BMI with at least 3 commensurate time points were selected.
  • Of 1865 records, 60 eligible studies with 112 cohorts of 5603 participants were identified

Wrap It Up

The finding of temporal sequencing (in which changes in fasting insulin level precede changes in weight) is not consistent with the assertion that obesity causes non-communicable chronic diseases and premature death by increasing levels of fasting insulin. Meaning that that adverse consequences currently attributed to obesity could be attributed to hyperinsulinemia (or another proximate factor). Which is interesting in my book. I thought you all might like it. 

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #2 And our last item today is called “Effect of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment vs Sham Treatment on Activity Limitations in Patients With Nonspecific Subacute and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial” by Nguyen et. al.  [2] and published in JAMA Internal Medicine on March 15, 2021 which is indeed too hot to manipulate by one’s hand. 

Why They Did It They say that Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is frequently offered to people with nonspecific low back pain (LBP) but never compared with sham OMT for reducing LBP-specific activity limitations. Knowing this, they wanted to compare the efficacy of standard OMT vs sham OMT for reducing LBP-specific activity limitations at 3 months in persons with nonspecific subacute or chronic LBP.

How They Did It

  • This prospective, parallel-group, single-blind, single-center, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial recruited participants with nonspecific subacute or chronic LBP in France starting February 17, 2014, with follow-up completed on October 23, 2017. 
  • Participants were randomly allocated to interventions
  • Six sessions (1 every 2 weeks) of standard OMT or sham OMT delivered by nonphysician, nonphysiotherapist osteopathic practitioners.
  • The primary end point was reduction in LBP-specific activity limitations at 3 months as measured by the self-administered Quebec Back Pain Disability Index. 
  • Secondary outcomes were mean reduction in LBP-specific activity limitations; mean changes in pain and health-related quality of life; number and duration of sick leaves, as well as number of LBP episodes at 12 months; 
  • and consumption of analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at 3 and 12 months. 
  • Adverse events were self-reported at 3, 6, and 12 months.

What They Found

Overall, 200 participants were randomly allocated to standard OMT and 200 to sham OMT, with 197 analyzed in each group

Wrap It Up In this randomized clinical trial of patients with nonspecific subacute or chronic LBP, standard OMT had a small effect on LBP-specific activity limitations vs sham OMT. However, the clinical relevance of this effect is questionable. So, look…..this paper and these researches absolutely wasted time, effort, and money in an attempt to make spinal manipulative therapy look bad. Who in the h e double hockey sticks sees new patients once every 2 weeks for only 6 visits?? Especially in a chronic pain sufferer. Trash, garbage.

Or since it was in France…..garbage.  It’s dumb, useless, and meaningless and I’m almost offended that this is even a paper. I’m starting ANY brand new case with 3 per week for a week or two minimum. Minimum. Combined with other appropriate ancillaries including exercise, soft tissue stuff, maybe acupuncture, maybe laser, maybe a referral to cognitive-behavioral therapist, maybe biomechanics coaching, and on and on and on. 

Papers like this and authors like this should give it up and get out of the game if they’re not going to be able to throw something together that’s better than this heap of trash.  Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.       

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

1. Wiebe N, Y.F., Crumley ET, Bello A, Stenvinkel P, Tonelli M,, Temporal Associations Among Body Mass Index, Fasting Insulin, and Systemic Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA Netw Open, 2021. 4.

2. Nguyen C, B.I., Zegarra-Parodi R,, Effect of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment vs Sham Treatment on Activity Limitations in Patients With Nonspecific Subacute and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Intern Med, 2021.

My Insane Life, Hip & Knee Osteoarthritis, Risks For Acute to Chronic Pain

CF 167: My Insane Life, Hip & Knee Osteoarthritis, Risks For Acute to Chronic Pain Today we’re going to talk about hip and knee osteoarthritis and we’ll talk about the risks for back pain going from acute to chronic pain. Interesting couple of papers. Plus all my current ongoings.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.   We’re the fun kind of research. The Bon Jovi and Def Leppard kind of research.  Not the stuffy, high-brow, high and mighty, better than you kind of research.  We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #167  Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about dry needling, types of exercises that count, motor skills for chronic low back, and the relationship between high blood pressure and dementia. Keeping you folks smart! Check it out.  Keep up with the class.  

On the personal end of things…..

Alright, you wanna talk about juggling a bunch of balls in the air, I’m here to tell you about having balls in the air. Let’s go through it a bit, shall we? Then you can find yourself and your situation and maybe my path helps you on yours. 

    • I lost my office manager of over 11 years – here’s what I’m doing about that. 
    • Setting up a medical entity – what’s that about?
    • Looking at RHC’s – explanation to follow
    • I have finished my book – The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Into The Research.  – What’s that process like so far?
    • I have a virtual Assistant helping me build a website to help you all succeed – what’s the timeline? 
    • I started my second Fellowship/Diplomate program last week. Maybe I’ve lost my mind
    • Here in Texas, we went through SNOWVID 19
    • We are switching CPAs. Maybe this group gets it right. 
    • The Voice Over career has started going a little crazy here lately – I’ll explain
    • I’m about to head to Florida because…..well….because my life.
    • My main computer that holds my life has been dead for two weeks now. 

Hell yeah, folks. Lol. It’s a wonderful life, right? Let’s start at the top. As I’ve mentioned a time or two, my main employee, my OG staffer, over 11 years, and basically almost family member actually quit me and went to work elsewhere making a little more money with the change of making even a bit more next year. 

So, my main right-hand wo-man is adios but Jiminy crickets people….do you have a clue how much money I’m saving on this? She got raises every year for 11 years in her normal capacity and we created an extra marketing position for her as well at a considerable amount monthly as well.  Now, that means I’m out a marketing position but it also means I can take that money and try some different marketing for a while. Because, if I’m being honest, I’m not sure how much what we were doing was actually helping.  Plus, with the money I’m saving here, I can transition.

With the closing of doors, we usually get to experience the opening of other doors. And that’s what we’re doing. As mentioned, we are using some of the funds we are now saving to move our practice into a medical entity, hire a nurse practitioner, and move toward being finally truly integrated.  This has been a goal for years but I’ve just never pulled the trigger. Now, with PPP in place to help us pay for our payroll, it makes sense to use our existing resources, in addition to what we are now saving, to go ahead and get it done.  I’ll update you on the process as I make my way.

So far, we’ve signed paperwork with the attorneys to create the entity, we have our attorney in communication with our new CPA, which I’ll talk about later, and I’ve started reaching out. I’ve also signed up with a consulting firm on it to try to make sure I have a head start and I’m not trying to re-invent the damn wheel. I don’t like making costly mistakes. My wife and I call them ‘dummy taxes.’

If you’ve been a regular listener here, you know I’ve paid some MONSTROUS, CATACLYSMIC dummy taxes.  First, I have some fairly close relationships in the medical community. So, not only to put them all on notice of what we have planned but also to test the waters of who may be interested in being a part of it….I started reaching out. Here’s how: Hey Friend! I’m in the process of transitioning to a medical entity and hiring a nurse practitioner eventually. I’ll need to have a medical director (MD/DO) to serve in that capacity.

As I go through the process of finding one, would you be willing or able to serve as a potential character witness on my behalf if the MD or DO wants to talk to people in healthcare that know me, have experience with me and my clinic, and can speak to how I approach healthcare? I just want to be sure and ask first before I get too much further into the process. Hope you’re doing well and having a good Monday. Now, my MD/DO friends may just step up and say, “Hey I’ll be your medical director!” They may not. We’ll see. I have one in mind but it’s always good to have more than one or two options, me thinks. Also, when I reach out to my NP friends, one may raise their hands to sign up. Either way, I’m being polite, I’m putting all my friends and network on notice of intentions, and who knows, maybe it serves as some sort of guerrilla marketing. I don’t see a downside.  So, that’s the process there so far.

We almost looked at a Rural Healthcare Clinic before we decided on going the NP route. And we may still eventually. We had a call with a consulting and management firm for the RHCs and it was alright but it was also clear that the ROI wasn’t where we had heard it was and it was clear that it’s quite an endeavor and even more regulated than the medical entity endeavor would be.  It made sense to go with what my colleagues and network is the most familiar with and potentially stray off into the RHC thing if the interest is still kicking around our brains in a couple of years. 

Next on my list, the book. Being an author has always been a big goal of mine.

I love books, I love reading, and I love the idea of facilitating learning. It’s a natural progression for me. As mentioned, it’s called ‘The Remarkable Truth About Chiropractic: A Unique Journey Through The Research’. It’s essentially all of these papers I go through every week organized into their relevant categories so that they’re all in one resource and are easy to find for quick reference. Some just have the Why They Did It, How They Did It, What They Found, and The Wrap It Up sections for each paper. Some topics go further into discussion and talking points.  I believe the way to do it these days is to self-publish. I’m still figuring it out right now while it is off being edited. You wanna know who’s editing it? It’s my good friend, literary scholar, and inventor of the Drop Release tool, and hospitalist chiropractor extraordinaire from the frozen tundra of North Dakota, Dr. Chris Howson! Thank you sir. This will give you all something to look forward to in the near future. I hope you’ll all need your very own copy! So…..that’s exciting. 

On top of that, I’ve had a virtual Assistant helping me build something I think some of you will be interested in. I don’t want to give to say too much until it’s built. First, I don’t want anyone beating me to the idea, and second, I don’t want to move in that direction and then figure out I can’t make it work and then it was for nothing. Nobody wants their failure in the shop’s front window….right there on Main Street! Lol. So I’ll just say that it is something that if you need it and haven’t used it before, will 100% help you be more successful and more cognizant of what’s going on with your business from day to day. So….that’s exciting as well. 

I started my second Fellowship/Diplomate program last week. Maybe I’ve lost my mind. I probably have. Or….I’m secretly a genius. Here’s what I’ve always said; I may get beat. I may not be the best ever. And that’s OK. But I can damn sure guarantee you that it will not be due to a lack of effort. It most certainly won’t be because someone else out-worked me. Maybe they were unethical. Maybe they were lucky. Maybe they inherited something I did not. But it won’t be because I got outworked or because I didn’t try hard enough. Maybe that’s just me. Maybe it’s totally Gen-X. I don’t know. But that’s the way it is in my life. 

Here in Texas, we went through SNOWVID 21. First, you have to know that my area of Texas is very used to snow and ice and blizzards and all of that good stuff. I grew up in it. What South Texas is not used to is the ice and blizzards and snow. That was rough on them but the real kicker was losing power for not only hours but for days. Losing electricity led to losing water. Then water pipes busting and homes and offices ruined. It’s a mess. Chiropractors and Texans, in general, are trying to recover but it wasn’t any little thing. It was the worst Winter Weather event since 1890 or something like that. People can figure out -30 degree wind chill. What they can’t figure out is no power, no water, and no food. It was that real for some folks. 

We are still going through the intro phases of the Wealthability program with the Tom Wheelright group, new CPAs, the whole thing. Part of that was figuring out that our previous CPAs have been wrong and we have to figure out how to get right and part of that answer is money so…..fun fun fun.

What a wonderful life.

I’ve been without my main computer for about two weeks due to Snowvid but it’s getting up and running today which means my life is going to be up and running just a bit smoother within a day or two. Yay!! The voice-over side gig is going a little crazy at the moment. I’ve found a way to get another full-time job I think. I’ll keep you updated as that goes along but, in short, I signed with a talent agency called Heyman Talent in Cincinnati Ohio and they cover Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky. I signed with Crown North out of San Francisco some time back as well so it’s an interesting adventure. I’m 48 years old and signing with talent agents. What the hell is that about exactly? Who knows but I’m a do-er. Let’s see what happens. 

OK, let’s get to the papers.

Only two this week because the personal side of things took a little longer than usual. Before we get to the papers though, let’s recognize my friends and this show’s amazing sponsors. 

CHIROUP 

Item #1 This first one is called “Diagnosis and Treatment of Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis – A Review” by Katz et. al. (1) and published in JAMA on February 9 of 2021, Hot off the press, smokin’ stack of steam.  What we have here on our hands…..on our meaty little mitts….is a good ol fashioned learnin’ sesh on Osteoarthritis. This is truly some good stuff, folks. Where in here can you find an opportunity to help patients and, in turn, make a living and be the expert in your community?

  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease, affecting an estimated more than 240 million people worldwide, including an estimated more than 32 million in the US. Osteoarthritis is the most frequent reason for activity limitation in adults. This Review focuses on hip and knee OA.
  • Patients with OA typically present with pain and stiffness in the affected joint(s). Stiffness is worse in the morning or on arising after prolonged sitting and improves within 30 minutes. Pain is use related early in the course but can become less predictable over time. Although OA is sometimes viewed as a disease of inexorable worsening, natural history studies show that most patients report little change in symptoms over 6 years of observation.
  • Nearly 30% of individuals older than 45 years have radiographic evidence of knee OA, about half of whom have knee symptoms.
  • Osteoarthritis leads to substantial cost and mortality. Forty-three percent of the 54 million individuals in the US living with arthritis (most of whom have OA) experience arthritis-related limitations in daily activities
  • Persons with knee OA spend an average of about $15 000 (discounted) over their lifetimes on the direct medical costs of OA.
  • Osteoarthritis can involve almost any joint but typically affects the hands, knees, hips, and feet. It is characterized by pathologic changes in cartilage, bone, synovium, ligament, muscle, and periarticular fat, leading to joint dysfunction, pain, stiffness, functional limitation, and loss of valued activities, such as walking for exercise and dancing
  • Risk factors include age (33% of individuals older than 75 years have symptomatic and radiographic knee OA), female sex, obesity, genetics, and major joint injury.
  • Persons with OA have more comorbidities and are more sedentary than those without OA. It has been estimated that 31% of persons with OA have at least 5 comorbid conditions.2 Persons with hip and knee OA have approximately 20% excess mortality compared with age-matched controls, in part because of lower levels of physical activity. They become sedentary
  • The reduced physical activity leads to a 20% higher age-adjusted mortality. 
  • Several physical examination findings are useful diagnostically, including bony enlargement in knee OA and pain elicited with internal hip rotation in hip OA. 
  • Radiographic indicators include marginal osteophytes and joint space narrowing. 
  • The cornerstones of OA management include exercises, weight loss if appropriate, and education—complemented by topical or oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in those without contraindications. 
  • Intra-articular steroid injections provide short-term pain relief and duloxetine has demonstrated efficacy. 
  • Opiates should be avoided. 
  • Clinical trials have shown promising results for compounds that arrest structural progression (eg, cathepsin K inhibitors, anabolic growth factors) or reduce OA pain (eg, nerve growth factor inhibitors). 
  • Persons with advanced symptoms and structural damage are candidates for total joint replacement. 

Conclusions and Relevance  

  • Education, exercise and weight loss are cornerstones of management, complemented by NSAIDs for the right patients, corticosteroid injections, and several adjunctive medications. 
  • For persons with advanced symptoms and structural damage, total joint replacement effectively relieves pain.

Item #2

Our second and last one today is called “Risk Factors Associated With Transition From Acute to Chronic Low Back Pain in US Patients Seeking Primary Care” by Stevans et. al. (2) and published in JAMA Network Open on February 16, 2021. Pop goes the weasel it’s fresh outta the oven!

Why They Did It To figure out the transition from acute to chronic low back pain using a tool to assess and predict the transition; demographic, clinical, and practice characteristics; and whether treatments that did not fit within common guidelines were partly to blame. 

They termed these treatments as nonconcordant. Treatments like opioids. Additionally, prescriptions that included benzodiazepines and/or systemic corticosteroids alone without the presence of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or short-term skeletal muscle relaxants were considered nonconcordant. Nonconcordant diagnostic imaging consisted of an order for lumbar radiograph or computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) scan. Nonconcordant medical subspecialty referral included referrals to nonsurgical or surgical specialties (eg, PTs, orthopedists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, or pain specialists). That was all considered nonconcordant care

How They Did It It was a cohort study with 5233 patients having acute low back pain Nearly half of the patients were exposed to at least one treatment recommendation that was not actually recommended within the first 21 days after the first visit   

What They Found

  • Patients were significantly more likely to transition to chronic low back pain as their risk on the prognostic tool increased and as they were exposed to more bad recommendations
  • Overall transition rate to chronic LBP at six months was 32%
  • Patient and clinical characteristics associated with the transition to chronic LBP included obesity, smoking, severe baseline disability, and depression/anxiety.
  • Patients exposed to 1, 2, or 3, bad recommendations in the first 21 days of pain were about 2 times more likely to develop chronic low back pain

Wrap It Up

This large inception cohort study found that the transition from acute to chronic LBP was substantial and the SBT was a robust prognostic tool. Early exposure to guideline nonconcordant care was significantly and independently associated with the transition to chronic LBP after accounting for patient demographic and clinical characteristics, such as obesity, smoking, baseline disability, and psychological comorbidities.

Boom. Instantly you’re smarter.  Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store  Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.     

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

The Message 

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:  At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact  Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect  We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website  https://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links  https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP  https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter  https://twitter.com/Chiro_Forward

YouTube  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

ITunes  https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link  https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:  https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn  https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host  Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger    

Bibliography

  1. Katz JN, Arant KR, Loeser RF. Diagnosis and Treatment of Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis: A Review. JAMA. 2021;325(6):568–578. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.22171
  2. Stevans JM, Delitto A, Khoja SS, et al. Risk Factors Associated With Transition From Acute to Chronic Low Back Pain in US Patients Seeking Primary Care. JAMA Netw Open. 2021;4(2):e2037371. doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.37371