youths

Obesity In Youths With Chronic Pain, The Healing Journey of Pain, and Fibromyalgia Treatment

CF 190: Obesity In Youths With Chronic Pain, The Healing Journey of Pain, and Fibromyalgia Treatment

Today we’re going to talk about obesity in youth and chronic pain, we’ll talk about fibromyalgia and hyperbaric oxygen chambers, and we’ll talk about chronic pain and the healing journey.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 
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You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #190 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we were joined by the amazing Dr. Brett Winchester from the St. Louis area. This doctor is just phenomenal in everything he does and says and we are all fortunate to have him in this profession. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class.  On the personal end of things….. Day 1 of our nurse practitioner starting is today. This morning has, of course, had its hiccups. We have the EHR where we have him set up but he has to have his own login and password and all that good stuff so that’s been one challenge so far.  Just getting oriented with where all of the stuff is, lidocaine, lab tubes, swabs, blah blah blah. Still waiting on the autoclave and still getting the malpractice policy in place this morning. What a process that’s been.  But we knew there’d be hiccups, and we’re getting them addressed. Then I have my regular life to contend with. I have patients to treat and a podcast to write so here we go. Short and sweet on this one because my cup is running over this morning.  Item #1 Our first item today is called “Obesity in Youth with Chronic Pain: Giving It the Seriousness It Deserves” by Hainsworth et. al. (Keri R Hainsworth 2021) and published in Pain Medicine in June of 2021 and day-um…..that’s hot! Why They Did It The aim of this commentary is to review the current science on co-occurring chronic pain and obesity in children and adolescents. In so doing, we also highlight some of the current gaps in knowledge. It is our hope that this commentary will draw attention to an overlooked area of research and clinical endeavors within the field of pediatric pain. The authors note that it is becoming increasingly clear that we should be familiar with this research. Both chronic pain and obesity have been rising in children for some time and studies are showing that obesity exacerbates the negative outcomes associated with chronic pain.  In addition, accumulating research exists on all facets of the co-occurrence of chronic pain and obesity in adults. Given all this, the paucity of research in this area of pediatric chronic pain and obesity is at a minimum, disheartening, and at a maximum, unconscionable. Ooooweee! That’s like putting a white glove on and smacking some clown around the room a little bit, isn’t it? I like it. It give me a little tickle.  Here are their main points:
  • On average, it can take 2 years longer for youth with obesity to be referred to a pediatric pain clinic than it does for youth with a normal weight
  • Pediatric patients with CPO have health-related quality of life that is more impaired in every domain than patients with chronic pain and a healthy body mass index percentile
  • Although systemic inflammation is commonly elevated in youth with obesity, patients with CPO have significantly higher levels of systemic inflammation than those with chronic pain alone or obesity alone 
  • Children with CPO are at increased risk of being treated as though they bear more responsibility for their health (and by extension, their pain) than youth without obesity and are at increased risk of pain dismissal and biased medical care
  • CPO in children and adolescents is associated with more impaired physical functioning and lower levels of physical activity than youth with chronic pain alone or obesity alone Further, parents report that their children with CPO (particularly girls) have greater functional disability (one of the most important outcomes in our field) than parents of youth with chronic pain and a normal body mass index
  • While multidisciplinary pain management programs work well for patients with a healthy weight, this is not true for those with comorbid obesity. Patients with a healthy weight improve in functional disability within 3 months of intake, whereas patients with CPO stagnate
First, even though we as clinicians and researchers need to address obesity in the context of chronic pain, we must be extremely thoughtful about how we move forward. Weight is a very sensitive subject, therefore, the call for more research in this area must strongly consider the need for sensitivity. CPO is the co-occurrence of a typically “invisible,” debilitating condition coupled with a condition so visible that it is sadly associated with victimization from important people in the child’s life, including peers, parents, and teachers Second, we would do well to closely follow the admonitions and advice of our colleagues whose primary clinical and research focus is on obesity and stigma. Suggestions from these experts include first recognizing that weight bias exists even among pediatric health care providers [20]. Additionally, language must be very carefully considered. Puhl et al. [20] offer the practical and sensitive suggestion to ask the patient and family about preferred words or terms in discussions about weight-related health Third, like other health care professionals, we would benefit from a greater understanding of the complexity of obesity and the “potential benefits and disadvantages of introducing weight-management discussions with patients” [14](p865). Certainly, there will be times when weight-related discussions would be contraindicated by the patient’s and/or family’s psychological or emotional state. However, when weight needs to be raised in relation to a child’s chronic pain, it may be best received in the context of health implications. Obesity is a multifactorial disease with strong genetic contributions. It is also associated with systemic inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, as well as chronic pain. In fact, most are unaware that obesity is a risk factor for migraines in pediatric populations. That said, weight-related health or weight-related pain discussions cannot focus entirely on losing weight. For many, it is a struggle to change their weight status, and even if it is possible, this process takes time. We must not ignore managing pain while we wait for possible weight reduction. CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT Item #2 Our second one today is called “Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Intervention in Individuals with Fibromyalgia” by Curtis et. al.(K Curtis 2021)  and published in Pain Medicine in June of 2021…….pork chops and apple sauce.  Why They Did It To evaluate the feasibility and safety of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). How They Did It
  • A total of 17 patients completed the study
  • A cohort study with a delayed treatment arm used as a comparator.
  • Hyperbaric Medicine Unit, Toronto General Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
  • Eighteen patients diagnosed with FM according to the American College of Rheumatology and a score ≥60 on the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire.
  • Participants were randomized to receive immediate HBOT intervention (n = 9) or HBOT after a 12-week waiting period
  • HBOT was delivered at 100% oxygen at 2.0 atmospheres per session, 5 days per week, for 8 weeks
  • Both groups were assessed at baseline, after HBOT intervention, and at 3 months’ follow-up.
What They Found
  • HBOT-related adverse events included mild middle-ear barotrauma in three patients and new-onset myopia in four patients
  • The efficacy of HBOT was evident in most of the outcomes in both groups
  • This improvement was sustained at 3-month follow-up assessment.
Wrap It Up HBOT appears to be feasible and safe for individuals with FM. It is also associated with improved global functioning, reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression, and improved quality of sleep that was sustained at 3-month follow-up assessment. I don’ tank about you but I’m not going to go out and buy an oxygen chamber this afternoon but, it’s interesting and I’ve always heard positive things about them so this one peaked my interest a bit. I figured it would with you as well.  Item #3 The last one is called “A Healing Journey with Chronic Pain: A Meta-Ethnography Synthesizing 195 Qualitative Studies” by Toye et. al. and also published in Pain Medicine in June of 2021….Smoke show!! You know, it’s almost like I got an email from Pain Medicine last week highlighting some of their newest research in their June edition. Weird how all of these articles were all in the same month and in the same episode here. Right? Why They Did It There is a large body of research exploring what it means for a person to live with chronic pain. However, existing research does not help us understand what it means to recover. We aimed to identify qualitative research that explored the experience of living with chronic pain published since 2012 and to understand the process of recovery. How They Did It
  • A synthesis of qualitative research using meta-ethnography.
  • We used the seven stages of meta-ethnography. 
  • We systematically searched for qualitative research, published since 2012, that explored adults’ experiences of living with, and being treated for, chronic pain. 
  • We used constant comparison to distill the essence of ideas into themes and developed a conceptual model.
  • We screened 1,328 titles and included 195 studies.
Wrap It Up The innovation of our study is to conceptualize healing as an ongoing and iterating journey rather than a destination. Health interventions for chronic pain would usefully focus on validating pain through meaningful and acceptable explanations; validating patients by listening to and valuing their stories; encouraging patients to connect with a meaningful sense of self, to be kind to themselves, and to explore new possibilities for the future; and facilitating safe reconnection with the social world. This could make a real difference to people living with chronic pain who are on their own healing journeys. Alright, that’s it. Keep on keepin’ on. Keep changing our profession from your corner of the world. The world needs evidence-based, patient-centered practitioners driving the bus so get active, get involved, and make it happen. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.  Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   

Purchase Dr. Williams’s book, a perfect educational tool and chiropractic research reference for the daily practitioner, from the Amazon store TODAY!

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health! Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic! Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference.  Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. Website
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Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/ Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/ Twitter YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2 Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021 Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/ About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger Bibliography
  • K Curtis, P., J Katz, PhD, C Djaiani, BSc, G O’Leary, MD, FRCPC, J Uehling, MS, CCRP, J Carroll, BHA, D Santa Mina, PhD, H Clarke, MD, PhD, FRCPC, M Gofeld, MD, PhD, FRCPC, R Katznelson, MD, FRCPC, (2021). “Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Intervention in Individuals with Fibromyalgia.” Pain Med 22(6): 1324-1332.
  • Keri R Hainsworth, P., Monica L Gremillion, PhD, W Hobart Davies, PhD, Stacy C Stolzman, PT, MPT, PhD, Steven J Weisman, MD, (2021). “Obesity in Youth with Chronic Pain: Giving It the Seriousness It Deserves.” Pain Med 22(6): 1243-1245.