jeff williams

Do Chiropractors Cause Disc Herniations & Family Doctors Still Don’t Get It

CF 178: Do Chiropractors Cause Disc Herniations & Family Doctors Still Don’t Get It

Today we’re going to talk about if chiropractors cause lumbar disc herniations and how primary doctors still don’t understand guidelines that are 4 years old at this point.

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do.
Like our Facebook page,
Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then
go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms.
We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter.

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #178

Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about spinal manipulative therapy effectiveness and chiropractic for colic. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class.

On the personal end of things…..
It’s dragging. Don’t think for a second that you’re going to set up a medical entity in just a week or so. Lol. Goodness gracious. I went through my orthopedic diplomate in 6 months for a reason. It’s not because I’m smarter than anyone else or that I have more extra time than anyone else. Far from it.
I went through it so quickly because I hate stuff just lingering out in the ether unfinished or waiting or on hold or whatever. It drives me crazy to have unfinished ideas or projects. Literally crazy.
So, this new growth thing is making me crazy because it’s still not tied up and we’re in a holding pattern until the papers are signed and we are credentialing. Which we aren’t doing just yet.

But, I think we’re close.

My book will be launching on Tuesday, June the 8th. Be looking for it, y’all! I’m beyond excited about it!

Business is slowly picking back up. Texas is wide open at this point. Its rarer to see someone wearing a mask than it is to see those not wearing masks. Concerts have returned. Crowds have returned. And Texas had the second slowest growth of COVID last month. What does that say exactly?? Hell if I know. But I see the University of Massachusetts penalizing kids for not wearing masks off-campus and I see Texas with little COVID growth yet we’re wide open with basically no masks.

Who’s right? To me, it looks like Texas and states like Texas are right at this point in time. All of the lockdowns were important and needed and effective. Now, it appears to be time to loosen up considerably and proceed with less fear and more science.

I’m not an expert in that field. But there has to be some science coming out of what’s happening and the differences between states still locked down and states that are wide open. Between kids that have been going to school since August of 2020 and kids that just started a week or two ago because their schools have been closed all year.

It’s all interesting. That’s for sure. As for me, in my area, the sense of a return to the old normal is refreshing. In a city area of about 270,000 people, we added 19 new cases yesterday. Again, I’m 100% honest when I tell you there are basically zero masks to be seen with 100% capacity everywhere you go.

You be the judge.

Item #1
This first one is called “Chiropractic care and risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a population-based self-controlled case series study”’ by Hincapie et. al. [1] and published in European Spine in July of 2018.

Why They Did It
“Our objective was to investigate the association between chiropractic care and acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgical intervention, and contrast this with the association between primary care physician care and acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgery.”

How They Did It
195 cases of acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgery (within 8 weeks) were identified in a population of more than 100 million person-years.
Self-controlled case series design and population-based healthcare databases in Ontario, Canada
They investigated all adults with acute lumbar disc herniation requiring emergency department (ED) visit and early surgical intervention from April 1994 to December 2004.
The relative incidence of acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgery in exposed periods after chiropractic visits relative to unexposed periods was estimated within individuals, and
compared with the relative incidence of acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgery following primary care physician visits.

What They Found
Strong positive associations were found between acute lumbar disc herniation and both chiropractic and primary care physician visits.
The risk for acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgery associated with chiropractic visits was no higher than the risk associated with primary care physician visits.

Wrap It Up
“Both chiropractic and primary medical care were associated with an increased risk for acute lumbar disc herniation requiring ED visit and early surgery. Our analysis suggests that patients with prodromal back pain from a developing disc herniation likely seek healthcare from both chiropractors and primary care physicians before full clinical expression of acute lumbar disc herniation. We found no evidence of excess risk for acute lumbar disc herniation with early surgery associated with chiropractic compared with primary medical care.”

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #2
The last one today is called “Initial Management of Acute and Chronic Low Back Pain: Responses from Brief Interviews of Primary Care Providers” by Roseen et. al. [2] and published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine in March of 2021 and we got a hot one folks!

Why They Did It
They say, “In April 2017, the American College of Physicians (ACP) published a clinical practice guideline for low back pain (LBP) [3] recommending nonpharmacologic treatments as first-line therapy for acute, subacute, and chronic LBP.”

Listeners of this Chiropractic Forward Podcast know this because I have been riding that horse nonstop since it came out. I mention damn near every single episode.

The objective here is “To assess primary care provider (PCP)-reported initial treatment recommendations for LBP following guideline release. “

How They Did It
Cross-sectional structured interviews.
Interviews were completed between December 2017 and March 2018.
Convenience sample of 72 primary care providers from 3 community-based outpatient clinics in high- or low-income neighborhoods.
The PCPs were interviewed about their familiarity with the ACP guideline, and how they initially manage patients with acute/subacute and chronic LBP.
PCPs were also asked about their comfort in referring patients to nonpharmacologic treatment providers, and about barriers to referring.

What They Found
Of 72 participating PCPs, over three-fourths indicated being familiar with the ACP guideline
For acute LBP, PCPs typically provided advice to stay active and pharmacologic management (97%; primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).
For chronic LBP, PCPs were more likely to recommend nonpharmacologic treatments than for acute LBP
The most common nonpharmacologic treatments recommended for chronic LBP were physical therapy (78%), chiropractic care (21%), massage therapy (18%), and acupuncture (17%)
The cost of nonpharmacologic treatments was perceived as a barrier.
However, PCPs working in low-income neighborhood clinics were as likely to recommend nonpharmacologic approaches as those from high-income neighborhood clinics.

Wrap It Up
“While most PCPs indicated they were familiar with the ACP guideline for LBP, nonpharmacologic treatments were not recommended for patients with acute symptoms. Further dissemination and implementation of the ACP guideline are needed.”

So, what’s it going to take? Well, for one, the more fringe and crazy part of our profession needs to cut their crap. No, I don’t want to be a medical doctor or I would have gone to med school.

What I DO want is to be a respected part of an integrated healthcare team. Like it or not, the PCP is the gatekeeper and if the PCPs trust us, we get more patients, and at the end of the day, aren’t more patients the name of the game? Come on, of course, it is.

If our profession moves into the year 2021 instead of 1896 or whatever year Palmer got the idea from the osteopaths, then we can move forward with becoming a part of the community. Rather than separate and distinct. I do like not being under the state medical boards and all that good stuff. That’s necessary while there’s still such a divide.

But we can become more and more of the team if we stop thee more fringe assertions and ideas. Nepute, to my understanding, the chiro out in St. Louis…..the dude that has been, in my view, an absolute lunatic all over social media, is the first person getting nailed under the new covid laws and just happens to be a chiropractor.

Not a good look. In my opinion, he’s done chiropractors zero favors and really bruised us up quite a bit. Why in the hell would a PCP…….or a circus worker…or anyone else in the damn world…..see someone like NePuke and associate them with all other chiropractors and decide they’ll never send a patient or a friend to whackos like chiropractors?

Raise the game folks. Raise the game. Get current. Get smart. Make sure you’re sciencing once or twice per day. It’s not hard to do. Get a Diplomate. Specialize. Raise the game

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.

Store
Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.

The Message
I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:
At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact
Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference.

Connect
We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links
https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link
https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:
https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn
https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography
1. Hincapie C, Chiropractic care and risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a population-based self-controlled case series study. European Spine Journal, 2018. 27(7): p. 1526-1537.
2. Roseen EJ, C.F., Atlas SJ, Mehta DH,, Initial Management of Acute and Chronic Low Back Pain: Responses from Brief Interviews of Primary Care Providers. J Altern Complement Med, 2021. 27(S1): p. S106-S114.
3. Qaseem A, Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians. Ann Intern Med, 2017. 4(166): p. 514-530.

Car Crashes and Research To Go Along With It (Part Two)

CF 176: Car Crashes and Research To Go Along With It (Part Two) Today we’re going to continue to talk about car wreck research. It’s good stuff and useful for all clinics and docs that deal with personal injury patients.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 
  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 
You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #176 Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about Car crashes and awesome research around that topic. Part one I guess. Today’s episode is pretty much part two. So, make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class.  On the personal end of things….. On the personal side of things, we are still going down the path towards having the medical entity completed. I made a hire that I feel confident in. The nurse practitioner was referred to me by another nurse practitioner here in town who was his preceptor or teacher for his clinical hours when he was going through school. She told me that he is super smart, excellent with patients, eager to learn, and his wife is an amazing cook. So I was sold. And just taking the time to get to know him, I’m even more confident that I have made a good decision going forward. The majority of the work on this is going to be in the first 3 to 6 months I think. We have to get systems in place, I have to teach the nurse practitioner the exam I do. How do you teach somebody how to do the exam that an ortho fellowship practitioner does? Well, we shall find out.  I’ve already loaned him one of my dr. Stuart McGill books to get started on. I’ve been sharing with him a lot of the information that I learned in the Neuromusculoskeletal program, I’ve talked to him about McKenzie protocols and migrating the disc, and started him on the path of different ways to think of chronic pain. Including the up-regulated and sensitized central nervous system as well as the biopsychosocial aspect of chronic pain. Yellow flags, words matter, limiting MRIs, and all of the associated Tom Foolery.   He was unfamiliar with quite a bit of what I have been teaching him and showing him. But very receptive and very interested in learning about that side of pain and newer ways of thinking about it and approaching it. I think we’re going to be a great team.  Outside of that part of my life, I’ve started with the book launch. Not really the launch itself as much as getting the book ready for launch and putting together a launch team. What does a launch tram do exactly? Well, let me tell you. Basically, I’m going to be uploading it to Amazon once it’s formatted for it and everything is in place. Then, it’ll be free for the first 3 days. That’s when everyone on my launch team will go download it. Then, leave a review for it…..because my launch team is cool and they know that’s part of the launch process.  The free downloads and the Amazon book reviews give the book a little Amazon juice which will propel it up the charts a bit. That way, when the initial 3 days are over, and I can start charging money for it, the Amazon Juice has it set up for success and sales.  So, that’s the plan and guess what?? I’d love it if you regular listeners would like to be on my launch team. If so, just send me an email to [email protected] and make sure you tell me you’re on the launch team. It’s that easy. Or, send me a message through our Facebook group or the Facebook page or through smoke signal.  Whatever means you can get me a message that you want to help us, that’ll work for me.  It would be rude of me to not thank a couple of folks. I need to thank Dr. Chris Howson and Dr. Steven Roffers for helping me with the editing process. Dr. Howson is the inventor of the Drop Release tool, he’s smarter than hell, and he’s a good person on top of all of that. Go check out the Drop Release tool and show Dr. Howson some love won’t you? Dr. Roffers is the group admin of the Facebook group called Chiropractic Research Alliance with over 8,000 members, he’s a certified medical editor and serves on the editorial boards of 14 journals. Dr. Roffers offered to help me edit the draft as well.  So, these two pros need to be thanked and properly recognized for their efforts and their generosity. I appreciate you two and just appreciate you.  I honestly thought I’d ask for launch team members and there’d be crickets. In the first post I made on my Facebook properties, I’ve now got about 25 super awesome people that want to help support and promote the project. And in the process, they’re supporting and promoting evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.  It’s a win-win and I thank you all. More to come as I get further down the road.  Now, on with the research.  CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT As I mentioned last week, this podcast episode was inspired by a recent episode of the Chiropractic Science podcast hosted by Dean Smith. It was episode number 55.  His guest was Dr. Michael Freeman who I talked about in last week’s episode. These papers are papers they talked about on that episode so, if you want it from the horse’s mouth, go over to Chiropractic Science and find the recent episode with Dr. Michael Freeman and hit play. Then come back here and get my take on it.  Now let me pause just a second and say that if you haven’t jumped into personal injury, don’t. Unless you plan on getting the education it takes to do a good job. Take courses. Make yourself the expert. Know your worth. It pays well but the stakes are high for your patients. You have to deal with attorneys. You might have to testify under oath in court. Do you REALLY want to do that if you’re education and experience are not up to snuff? When I jumped in back in 2007, I had a basic Chiro education but I was not specialized in car wrecks or whiplash. I could have been better. So I made myself better. I recognized my shortfalls and I filled the gaps. I got the Advanced Certification in whiplash biomechanics and Traumatology through the SPINE Institute out in San Diego, CA. I got the certification from the Personal Injury Institute through Matthew DeGaetano who was also a Croft Commando.  I have attended CE hours on PI specifically. I ended up compiling all of the experience and education into a macro for ChiroTouch. If you want to check that out, go to personalinjurymacro.com but you’re not going to want to buy it unless you’re using ChiroTouch. It’s like gold though if you have ChiroTouch.  It’s got all of the Croft stuff in there, the research citations, crash descriptions, risk assessments, the whole thing. Plus all of my customization after I went through the Fellowship for the Neuromusculoskeletal program. IT’s gold, folks.  Anyway, my point was that you do your reputation and you do your patients a disservice if you are in the PI arena but you don’t know what the hell you’re doing. Plain and simple. It’s lucrative but dammit, get educated or get out. And understand that you’re not going to get 100% on every case.  To demonstrate my point, as I said, I’m a specialist now with the Fellowship, I have the cert in whiplash biomechanics and Traumatology, and I’ve been recognized as an expert in whiplash at the District Court level. Because of my macros I created, I can make narrative reports that nobody I’ve met can beat.  And YET…..I still don’t get 100% of my bills. Don’t think you’re going to get 100% either.  Because that’s the way PI works. Not all cases are created equally. Some fall apart completely. Some attorneys are truly awful people so stay on your toes. Some are amazing people and those are the ones you want to work with. Sometimes, the patient disappears. Sometimes they get in trouble and go to jail. Sometimes the insurance company just won’t budge and the attorney doesn’t feel there’s a strong enough case to go to court on.  At those times, you better be willing to wheel and deal. Otherwise, you might get that one bill paid but that attorney won’t be sending you any more clients and guess what? Attorneys talk to each all of the time. They’re mostly all good friends.  Some of my best friends professionally are attorneys. Some of my biggest enemies professionally through the years have been attorneys. One still owes me $42,000 and I don’t expect I’ll ever get it out of him because he’s a worthless, useless, terrible human being. But, it’s part of the dangers of swimming in this particular lake. Some of the fish have no souls.  But again, some are amazing people that I have forged solid friendships with.  I went off the rails a bit there but the point again is this; either get educated and do it at a high level or leave it to others that did actually put the work in to get the extra education. Plain and simple.  Item #1 Our first paper is called, “A systematic approach to clinical determinations of causation in symptomatic spinal disk injury following motor vehicle crash trauma”’ by Dr. Michael Freeman, et. al. (Freeman MD 2009)  and published in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation back in 2008.  Why They Did It This is a really long description of the objective here so follow along and we’ll discuss, “Clinical determinations of causation in cases of intervertebral disk (IVD) injury after a motor vehicle crash (MVC) are often disputed in court settings.  No published systematic guidelines exist for making such determinations. This has resulted in nonclinical people determine injury causation and performing the evaluations. This is traditionally a clinical activity.  The result is causal determinations that are potentially disconnected from clinical observations of injury. Meaning, when non-clinical people are doing the evaluation, they get it wrong a lot.  The purpose of this review was to evaluate the current literature on causation, causal determinations after trauma and intervertebral disk injury after a motor vehicle crash, and to develop a practicable, logical, and literature-based approach to causation determinations of symptomatic intervertebral disk injury after a motor vehicle crash. That was almost all quoted from the paper’s abstract but I tried to make it even more basic and less confusing.  What They Found
  • The results of the review indicate IVD injury can result from any MVC regardless of magnitude, thus meeting the first criteria of causation, biologic plausibility.
  • Individual determinations of causation depend entirely on the temporal association between the collision and the symptom onset (the second criterion) and a lack of a more probable explanation for the symptoms (the third).
  • When these causal elements are met, clinicians can assert causation on a “more probable than not” or “reasonable probability” basis.
  • You may have heard me mention I’m currently undergoing the Forensics Diplomate program right now. That is legal speak there. Probably meaning ‘greater than a 50% chance.”
Wrap It Up For the conclusion, they say, “Because of a lack of an established or reliable relationship between collision force and the probability of IVD injury the investigation of collision parameters is not a useful adjunct to causal determinations.” Item #2 Our last one today is called “Diagnostic Accuracy of Videofluoroscopy for Symptomatic Cervical Spine Injury Following Whiplash Trauma” by Freeman et. al. (Freeman MD 2020) and published in the International Journal Of Environmental Research and Public Health in 2020 and that’s still got some smoke! Now….if you don’t know, what is Videofluoroscopic examination? It’s basically x-rays (and video) that are dynamic. X-rays that are moving. So you can see the patient go into cervical flexion. It’s cool as hell. But you can accurately see when there is ligament injury or ligament laxity as well because in real time, you can observe the one vertebra slide forward on the one under. It’s crazy and a bit spooky.  When you see one vertebra slip forward on the one underneath as the patient goes into cervical flexion, it’ll make you anxious in your belly. It might make you pee a little. Anyway, look it up. See if you can find some videos through your Google machine.  Why They Did It Intervertebral instability is a relatively common finding among patients with chronic neck pain after whiplash trauma. Videofluoroscopy (VF) of the cervical spine is a potentially sensitive diagnostic tool for evaluating instability, as it offers the ability to examine relative intervertebral movement over time, and across the entire continuum of voluntary movement of the patient. At the present time, there are no studies of the diagnostic accuracy of Videofluoroscopy for discriminating between injured and uninjured populations. How They Did It
  • Symptomatic (injured) study subjects were recruited from consecutive patients with chronic (>6 weeks) post-whiplash pain presenting to medical and chiropractic offices equipped with Videofluoroscopy facilities.
  • Asymptomatic (uninjured) volunteers were recruited from family and friends of patients. 
  • Three statistical models were utilized to assess the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) of positive Videofluoroscopy findings to correctly discriminate between injured and uninjured subjects.
What They Found
  • A total of 196 subjects (119 injured, 77 uninjured) were included in the study.
  • Videofluoroscopic examination of the cervical spine provides a high degree of diagnostic accuracy for the identification of vertebral instability in patients with chronic pain stemming from whiplash trauma.
Wrap It Up “Videofluoroscopic examination of the cervical spine provides a high degree of diagnostic accuracy for the identification of vertebral instability in patients with chronic pain stemming from whiplash trauma.”     Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.    Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.   
Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg
  The Message I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!   Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!   Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference.    Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.   Website
Home
  Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/   Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/   Twitter     YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q   iTunes https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2   Player FM Link https://player.fm/series/2291021   Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through   TuneIn https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/   About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger   Bibliography Freeman MD, C. C., Kohles S, (2009). “A systematic approach to clinical determinations of causation in symptomatic spinal disk injury following motor vehicle crash trauma.” PM R. 1(10): 951-956.   Freeman MD, K. E., Rosa S, Gatterman B, Strommer E, Leith W, (2020). “Diagnostic Accuracy of Videofluoroscopy for Symptomatic Cervical Spine Injury Following Whiplash Trauma.” Int J Environ Res Public Health 17(5): 1693.  

Nutrition for Pain, CBT for Pain, TMJ, & 2020 Deaths

 CF 173: Nutrition for Pain, CBT for Pain, TMJ, & 2020 Deaths

Today we’re going to talk a lot about pain. Nutrition for chronic pain, CBT and CFT for chronic pain, we’ll talk about TMJ treatment, and we’ll talk about deaths in 2020. This episode is full of info so let’s dive in. 

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

 

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #173

Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about useless research and we talked about insult vs. inflammation. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

I don’t know if I mentioned it or not but I got my book back from Dr. Chris Howson up in the Great State of North Dakota. He spent some time editing it. Dr. Howson is the inventor of the Drop Release tool and is just a super dude on top of being brilliant. If you don’t know about Drop Release, go check it out at https://droprelease.com. It’s pretty cool and something you can use to speed up soft tissue work in your practice. 

Now that we have gone through that process, I am teaching myself the way to self-publish this dude. When there are so many options, it can be daunting. It’s hard to know exactly where to go and how to do it. 

So that is the process I’m undergoing currently. Fortunately, I just noticed a colleague of mine that has recently published a book and it’s #1 on Amazon in its category. I reached out to her and she gave me a path to follow. So down the path I go. 

Still working on the medical integration here at the office. I’ve been having weekly calls with the integration consultant we are using. We are using Dr. Tyce Hergert down in Southlake, TX who has been integrated for 5-6 years at this point. Maybe even longer. He’s been through it for sure. If you are going through integration and need a little guidance, email me at [email protected] and I’ll get you in touch with Dr. Hergert. 

Our attorney and CPA group got together and got it all figured out so we are moving forward with that aspect of it. Now, if we can just get that Nurse Practitioner hired. I made a mistake that could be seen as misleading. On the Indeed ad I placed, I put the wage at $65/hr. What wasn’t in the ad because there wasn’t a place for it, is that we have only about 33 hrs of hands on time per week. We are starting our NP off at around $85-$90k per year. 

I think one of the NPs got PO’d at me because I was absolutely hiring her. No doubt. She was the one. When it came down to it, she asked my the yearly salary. I told her and she said she wouldn’t and couldn’t do it for less than $125k/year. 

Well, damn. Back almost at square one on that end of things. I had made my mind up on her. Not only that, I think she was mad at me. Lol. So, I went and changed it to the yearly salary to make sure I wasn’t being misleading in any way. 

Now, the goal is to start at $85k and have them up to $120k within 3-4 years. But you can’t start something brand new at that level when you have no clue how it’s going to all work out and come together. It’s already a huge risk to start with. Why make any riskier from the get go?

So, that’s where all of that stands for now. Getting the book together, getting the medical entity rolling, and getting busy as hell again. Oh my gosh. It’s going to take a minute to get used to treating the numbers we were treating back before COVID came along. Today, as I found a little window to start typing today, I’ve got 56 on the schedule. That hasn’t happened since December of 2019. Maybe January of 2020. Maybe. 

February 2020 came along and destroyed business. BAM…..30% at least was gone. We went from 185-200 visits per week all the way down to 115 or so. It wasn’t awesome. I’m not going to lie. OK, it was awful actually. We paid the bills but nobody made any money. That’s for damn sure. 

Now, for the last 2-3 weeks, things are beginning to get a little crazy again. Thank goodness. I hope you are experiencing the resurgence I am experiencing. I think deep down, we all know it’s going to be OK but it’s sure refreshing to finally start to feel it and see it. 

Onto the research!

Item #1

The first one today is called “Do Nutritional Factors Interact with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain? A Systematic Review” by Elma et. al. [1] and published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine in March of 2020 and that’s only a little smoky but still hot enough!

Why They Did It

They say, “Dietary patterns may play an important role in musculoskeletal well-being. However, the link between dietary patterns, the components of patients’ diet, and chronic musculoskeletal pain remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to systematically review the literature on the link between dietary patterns, the components of patients’ diet and chronic musculoskeletal pain”

How They Did It

  • (PRISMA) guidelines were used
  • Online databases PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were used 
  • 20,316 articles screened and only 12 found eligible to be included in this review
  • They consisted of 9 experimental and 3 observational studies

What They Found

  • 7 out of 9 experimental studies showed a pain-relieving effect of dietary changes
  • Protein, fat, and sugar intake were found to be associated with pain intensity and pain threshold

Wrap It Up

In an interesting conclusion, the authors say, “Plant-based diets might have pain relieving effects on chronic musculoskeletal pain. Patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis pain can show inadequate intake of calcium, folate, zinc, magnesium, and vitamin B6, whilst patients with fibromyalgia can show a lower intake of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamin A-E-K, folate, selenium, and zinc. Chronic pain severity also shows a positive relation with fat and sugar intake in osteoarthritis, and pain threshold shows a positive association with protein intake in fibromyalgia.”

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Item #2

This second one is called “CBT and CFT for Chronic Pain” by Graham Hadley and Matthew Novitch [2] and published in Current Pain and Headache Reports on April 1, 2021. Dammit stand back, we got a hot one. 

Why They Did It

Chronic pain is a widespread public and physical health crisis, as it is one of the most common reasons adults seek medical care and accounts for the largest medical reason for disability in the USA. 

  • Chronic pain is associated with decreased functional status, opioid dependence and substance abuse disorders, mental health crises, and overall lower perceived quality of life. 
  • Evidence suggests that persistent low back pain (pLBP) is a multidimensional biopsychosocial problem with various contributing factors. Emotional distress, pain-related fear, and protective movement behaviors are all unhelpful lifestyle factors that previously were more likely to go unaddressed when assessing and treating patient discomfort….
  • and as we just covered, diet might play a part in it as well. 
  • Those that are not properly assisted with these psychosocial issues are often unlikely to benefit from treatment in the primary care setting and thus are referred to multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation physicians. 
  • This itself increases healthcare costs, and treatments can be invasive and have risks of their own. 
  • Therefore, less expensive and more accessible management strategies targeting these psychosocial issues should be started to facilitate improvement early. 
  • As a biopsychosocial disorder, chronic pain is influenced by a range of factors including lifestyle, mental health status, familial culture, and socioeconomic status. 
  • Physicians have moved toward multi-modal pain approaches in order to combat this public health dilemma, ranging from medications with several different mechanisms of action, lifestyle changes, procedural pain control, and psychological interventions. 
  • Part of the rehabilitation process now more and more commonly includes cognitive behavioral and cognitive functional therapy. 
  • Cognitive functional therapy (CFT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both multidimensional psychological approaches to combat the mental portion of difficult pain control. 
  • While these therapies are quite different in their approach, they lend to the idea that chronic pain can and should be targeted using coping mechanisms, helping patients understand the pathophysiological process of pain, and altering behavior.
  • CFT differs from CBT functionally, as instead of improving managing/coping mechanisms of pain control from a solely mental approach, CFT directly points out maladaptive behaviors and actively challenges the patient to change them in a cognitively integrated, progressive overloading functional manner
  • With a robust set of data, one can conclude that CBT and CFT are exceptional therapeutic methods in improving chronic pain or the overall well-being of our patients. 

Item #3

This one is called “The Leading Causes of Death in the US for 2020” by Ahmad et. al. [3] and published in JAMA on March 31, 2021 and that’s definitely some hot stuff right there. 

This is more of an article rather than research and it won’t take us long to hit the high points here. 

  • Provisional estimates indicate a 17.7% increase in the number of deaths in 2020 (the increase in the age-adjusted rate was 15.9%) compared with 2019, with increases in many leading causes of death.1 The provisional leading cause-of-death rankings for 2020 indicate that COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death in the US behind heart disease and cancer
  • Cause-of-death data are based on the underlying cause of death, which is the disease or condition responsible for initiating the chain of events leading to death.
  • The provisional number of deaths occurring in the US among US residents in 2020 was 3 358 814, an increase of 503 976 (17.7%) from 2019
  • COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death in 2020, with an estimated 345 323 deaths, and was largely responsible for the substantial increase in total deaths from 2019 to 2020.
  • Substantial increases from 2019 to 2020 also occurred for several other leading causes. Heart disease deaths increased by 4.8%, the largest increase in heart disease deaths since 2012

I know……I know….car wrecks were reported as COVID and all that. I know….you do you boo. 

Item #4

This last one is called “Manual therapy for temporomandibular disorders: A review of the literature” by Kalam ir et. al. [4] and published in Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies in January of 2007. Definitely not hot. 

Why They Did It

The contemporary biopsychosocial health paradigm emphasizes a reversible and conservative approach to chronic pain management. Manual therapy for temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) claims to fulfil these criteria. An assessment of the utilization and efficacy of manual therapy for this condition is therefore required. 

How They Did It

  • A review of the literature pertaining to manual therapy for TMDs was undertaken between September and December 2005. Keywords used in the search were: TMD, manual therapy, massage, manipulation, mobilization, adjustment, chiropractic, osteopathy, physiotherapy, exercise.
  • A four member reviewer panel identified eight (n=8) randomized controlled trials of sufficiently reliable power to be suitable for inclusion in the review, of which only three included manipulative treatment of the temporomandibular joint. 

Wrap It Up

The results of manual therapy trials for this condition suggest that manual therapy is a viable and useful approach in the management of TMD. Manual therapy has also been shown to be more cost effective and less prone to side effects than dental treatment. 

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

Subscribe Button

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

1. Elma O, Y.S., Deliens T, Coppieters I,, Do Nutritional Factors Interact with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain? A Systematic Review. J Clin Med, 2020. 9(3): p. 702.

2. Hadley G, N.M., CBT and CFT for Chronic Pain. Current Pain Headache Reports, 2021. 25(35).

3. Ahmad F, A.R., The Leading Cause of Death in the US for 2020. JAMA, 2021.

4. Kalamir A, P.H., Vitiello A,, Manual therapy for temporomandibular disorders: A review of the literature. J Bodyw Mov Ther, 2007. 11(1): p. 84-90.

Useless Research & Insulin or Inflammation

CF 172: Useless Research & Insulin or Inflammation Today we’re going to talk about how I treat my staff, we’ll talk about insulin vs. inflammation, and we’ll talk about some trash research that came out in JAMA recently that you may wind up being confronted with at some point so listen up.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #172 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about going the way of the non-pharma world. If we could just get the the medical world to take a look at it. We also talked about insurance coverage trends and how they’re not very favorable to chiropractors. As you probably already feel. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

On the personal end of things, we’re still interviewing nurse practitioners and still getting our ducks in a row. We have the attorney that is setting up the medical entity meeting with our CPAs out in St. Louis to make sure it is set up in the most tax-advantageous as well as the most ideal legal way.  Any time you have your CPA and your attorney working together, you’re probably in a good place me thinks. I have a meeting with the medical director this week to go over what services he’s going to be OK with us offering. When appropriate, we’ll be looking at things like intra-joint injections, trigger point injections, low-level scripts but no narcotics.  Basically, anything we offer here will be very low risk. Not only because it inherently lowers our risk to adverse events, which makes me sleep better every night, but it also helps to keep a happy medical director. If it all works right, this is almost mailbox money for the medical director while providing an awesome gig for a nurse practitioner that is at least halfway motivated to build their practice. 

Think about it, nurses and nurse pracs are used to 12-hour shifts. They’ve missed important holidays and important events in their personal life due to having to work. Here, there are no weekends, there are not holidays spent working, vacation time, it’s all good in the hood at my place. Plus, they get to learn as much about orthopedics as they want to learn and a whole bunch they maybe don’t want to learn but is required to learn in order to work here.  That’s the deal though right?

Gotta pick the right NP because it all hinges on that one decision. Pick the wrong one and you’re out of business until you can get another hired. Doesn’t sound like a big deal until you factor in the 3 months it takes to get a new one credentialed. Speaking of, I have to get re-credentialed under the new medical entity. That’s because of Stark and anti-kickback laws.  This isn’t something to go into lightly. It’s like I said last week or two weeks ago here on the podcast, the wheels on this thing turn slowly and I’m OK with that. That way I don’t get out over my skis and lose control.  So, that’s where we’re at on that. 

Currently, I’m taking the opportunity to type this out on a Sunday afternoon. We are up at the office throwing a staff member her baby shower. No, I’m not a baby shower kind of dude as you may have guessed. I’m a Bud Light and guitars kind of guy. But, my wife decided we’re throwing our staff member a baby shower so here I am at the office recording this while the chicks and the hens are out there clucking and cackling. And I don’t mean that in a misogynist way. I mean it in a funny, playful kind of way so take it that way. 

It brought up a thought; do you treat your staff members like workers? Or do you treat them more like family? Right or wrong, as a result of my nature and my heart, we treat ours like family when appropriate. I’ve had staff ask me advice on deep dark stuff they were struggling with. I’ve had staff whose family was going to prison, the whole town knew, they were ashamed, and they just need some love, a little extra consideration, and a few big hugs. That one still gets me a little emotional when I think about it.  I’m going to give you a few more examples here but before I do, I don’t want you to misunderstand anything here. I’ve learned over the years that you cannot buy loyalty from your staff. They’re either with you every step of the way, or they are not. And that’s OK. Everyone is coming from different places, experiences, and motivations. Not a thing wrong with that.  But don’t do things for the wrong reasons. Don’t think you’re going to do a bunch of things for staff thinking it’ll ensure they stay with you forever. That’s just not reality and it’s a good way to allow yourself to get hurt on some level.  If you’re going to treat staff like family, you do it for all of the right reasons. Love, appreciation for them and their character, admiration for a job well done, team building, and things like that.  Getting back to it, I’ve sold a car to a staffer that was coming out of a bad relationship and had no transportation. I sold it to them for about $4,000 less than I could have gotten for it and let them pay it out $50 a paycheck and zero interest.  I’ve created a new, extra job for a staffer that was about to lose their house. It cost me an extra $1500/month for the following 2-3 years but that’s the way I am. 

I’ve sponsored kids sports for staffers more times than I can even start to recall.  In the end, money will come and go. It can be lost and it can be made. But it’s the relationships that stay with us.

Were we put on the planet just to make money and take care of our families? 

Or were we put on this planet to make ALL of our immediate relationships prosper and make the world, or at least our part of it, a better place?  You probably know where I come down on all that. It may sound a little hippy-dippy there, which I’m not at all, but I do see it that way. Money is nice and I see it as a challenge. A challenge to make it and see how much I can make ethically and morally. It’s fun to make money! But money really isn’t my main motivation any more.

I’m a huge stats person and track stuff like crazy. I balance my own bank statement every month. But I don’t count pennies anymore. I just don’t. I’m more into people, smiles, and all the good feels. Making people’s lives better when possible.  Alright, enough mushy stuff. 

Item #1 This first one today is called “Temporal Associations Among Body Mass Index, Fasting Insulin, and Systemic Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis” by Wiebe et. al. [1] and was published in JAMA on March 12, 2021 and that so hot it’s got my glasses all steamy. I can’t see a thing. 

Why They Did It The authors wanted to answer the question of “What are the temporal associations among higher body mass index (BMI) and chronic inflammation and/or hyperinsulinemia?” They say that Obesity is associated with a number of noncommunicable chronic diseases and is supposedly a cause of premature death. They wanted to summarize evidence on the temporality of the association between higher body mass index (BMI) and chronic inflammation and hyperinsulinemia.

How They Did It

  • MEDLINE (1946 to August 20, 2019) and Embase (from 1974 to August 19, 2019) were searched
  • The data analysis was conducted between January 2020 and October 2020.
  • Longitudinal studies and randomized clinical trials that measured fasting insulin level and/or an inflammation marker and BMI with at least 3 commensurate time points were selected.
  • Of 1865 records, 60 eligible studies with 112 cohorts of 5603 participants were identified

Wrap It Up

The finding of temporal sequencing (in which changes in fasting insulin level precede changes in weight) is not consistent with the assertion that obesity causes non-communicable chronic diseases and premature death by increasing levels of fasting insulin. Meaning that that adverse consequences currently attributed to obesity could be attributed to hyperinsulinemia (or another proximate factor). Which is interesting in my book. I thought you all might like it. 

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Item #2 And our last item today is called “Effect of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment vs Sham Treatment on Activity Limitations in Patients With Nonspecific Subacute and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial” by Nguyen et. al.  [2] and published in JAMA Internal Medicine on March 15, 2021 which is indeed too hot to manipulate by one’s hand. 

Why They Did It They say that Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is frequently offered to people with nonspecific low back pain (LBP) but never compared with sham OMT for reducing LBP-specific activity limitations. Knowing this, they wanted to compare the efficacy of standard OMT vs sham OMT for reducing LBP-specific activity limitations at 3 months in persons with nonspecific subacute or chronic LBP.

How They Did It

  • This prospective, parallel-group, single-blind, single-center, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial recruited participants with nonspecific subacute or chronic LBP in France starting February 17, 2014, with follow-up completed on October 23, 2017. 
  • Participants were randomly allocated to interventions
  • Six sessions (1 every 2 weeks) of standard OMT or sham OMT delivered by nonphysician, nonphysiotherapist osteopathic practitioners.
  • The primary end point was reduction in LBP-specific activity limitations at 3 months as measured by the self-administered Quebec Back Pain Disability Index. 
  • Secondary outcomes were mean reduction in LBP-specific activity limitations; mean changes in pain and health-related quality of life; number and duration of sick leaves, as well as number of LBP episodes at 12 months; 
  • and consumption of analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at 3 and 12 months. 
  • Adverse events were self-reported at 3, 6, and 12 months.

What They Found

Overall, 200 participants were randomly allocated to standard OMT and 200 to sham OMT, with 197 analyzed in each group

Wrap It Up In this randomized clinical trial of patients with nonspecific subacute or chronic LBP, standard OMT had a small effect on LBP-specific activity limitations vs sham OMT. However, the clinical relevance of this effect is questionable. So, look…..this paper and these researches absolutely wasted time, effort, and money in an attempt to make spinal manipulative therapy look bad. Who in the h e double hockey sticks sees new patients once every 2 weeks for only 6 visits?? Especially in a chronic pain sufferer. Trash, garbage.

Or since it was in France…..garbage.  It’s dumb, useless, and meaningless and I’m almost offended that this is even a paper. I’m starting ANY brand new case with 3 per week for a week or two minimum. Minimum. Combined with other appropriate ancillaries including exercise, soft tissue stuff, maybe acupuncture, maybe laser, maybe a referral to cognitive-behavioral therapist, maybe biomechanics coaching, and on and on and on. 

Papers like this and authors like this should give it up and get out of the game if they’re not going to be able to throw something together that’s better than this heap of trash.  Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.       

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

1. Wiebe N, Y.F., Crumley ET, Bello A, Stenvinkel P, Tonelli M,, Temporal Associations Among Body Mass Index, Fasting Insulin, and Systemic Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA Netw Open, 2021. 4.

2. Nguyen C, B.I., Zegarra-Parodi R,, Effect of Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment vs Sham Treatment on Activity Limitations in Patients With Nonspecific Subacute and Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Intern Med, 2021.

Non-Pharma – This Is The Way & Insurance Coverage Trends

CF 171: Non-Pharma – This Is The Way & Insurance Coverage Trends

Today we’re going to talk about insurance coverage for complementary care and we’ll talk about non-pharma treatment. This is the way. 

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #171

Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about how the medical complex still gets it so wrong when it comes to back pain. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

Things are still proceeding at the speed of molasses on the medical integration. I’m afraid that’s going to be a theme going forward for a little bit. 

I can tell you that I posted the job with our local Texas Panhandle Nurse Practitioner Association and I posted it on Indeed. I’m getting lots of resumes now too. It’s a little crazy seeing some of these talented individuals. They’re trained in so many things and some are willing to re-locate here from more than 1,500 miles away. It’s a little cool. It’s a little overwhelming. 

But I’m stumbling through with the help of my wife and with the help of my buddy. He’s been on this podcast 3-4 times. Most recently on the episode a couple weeks ago when we spoke about the lawsuit we Texas Chiropractors just won over the Texas Medical Association. Dr. Tyce Hergert has been fully integrated for 4-5 years now I believe. He start consulting on integration and that’s who helping guide me through it. 

So, at least I’m not trudging through it alone or re-inventing the wheel. I always felt like a mentor or at least a guide was the way to go with anything. 

I was doing decent in practice but it wasn’t until I started with a group that provided a network and a mentor for me back around 2011 or so that I really started taking off. I really believe a guide or a mentor is the most reasonable way to go about business of any kind. They shorten the learning curve so much and prevent very costly mistakes. 

Just a little tip from your ol’ Uncle Jeffro. You’re welcome. 

I’m starting the interviews this week. In fact, I’ve already had one interview. I don’t think she’s right for me. She needs a little more decorum in the place and I like a loose feel so that’s already an alarm that’s going off. Super smart though and willing to learn from a dirty ol’ chiropractor. Lol. 

Don’t think I didn’t take the opportunity to tell her about the American College of Physicians and give her the citation for their paper recommending chiropractors. Don’t you think I let that opportunity slip by!!

So I’ve mentioned the voice over thing a few times. It’s been a little nuts. In February I made $2,000 and in March, I’ll probably wrap up the month at around the $1500 mark. That’s $3,500 in two day-um months that I enjoyed doing in my basement and, honestly, it’s low maintenance and I can do the little jobs fairly quickly. It’s amazing. 

I’m still working on getting that book I wrote edited. Dr. Chris Howson from the great state of North Dakota, the inventor or the amazing new chiropractic took called Drop Release is editing if for me as we speak. I’ll keep you updated. 

Something that is a little different on the personal side of things;  I have been coaching my daughter on how to throw the discus. She’s in 7th grade so just learning. I won state in discus and competed in the shot put at state here in Texas. Winning state is a cool part of my past that I’ve always remembered so fondly. 

Well, working with her gave me the itch so now I went and bought me my very own man-sized discus and have started throwing again with the thought, or goal, of competing in a master’s tournament sometime in 2022. 

It’ll give me a goal to work toward physically. I absolutely love going to throw the discus. If I never actually get the nerve to go compete, I’mm still walking, getting my steps in and getting that exercise. 

It’s a win/win. And I looked up the results of the nationals back in 2018. It was held at Easter Washington State in Spokane, Washington and the throws I had after just practicing a little bit for a week would have gotten 4th place so……I think I’m just going to do it. Outside of potential injury, there really are no downsides to it. So, be looking for ol man Uncle Jeffro lobbing a discus around town in a year or so. I tell ya, I have to keep it interesting folks. I have to. 

Let’s get to it.

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #1

This one is called, “Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Nonpharmacologic, Noninvasive Treatments” by Flynn et. al. (1) and was published in American Family Physician on October 15, 2020. 

Shiiiizah

Why They Did It

Here’s what they come out of the gates bucking with: 

A chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder is the underlying diagnosis for 70% to 80% of those living with chronic pain. 

Among the top 12 causes of disability in the United States, musculoskeletal disorders cause more than one-third of years lived with disability and are among the leading causes of disability worldwide. 

Chronic low back pain, neck pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia are the most common types of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

You’ve heard me mention close to a million times about how the American College of Physicians updated their recommendations in 2016. In that recommendation, they set first-line treatment for acute and chronic low back pain. In those recommendations were spinal manipulative therapy, exercise, massage, acupuncture, heat, low level laser, yoga, cognitive behavioral therapy, and tai chi. 

Now, this seems to be the similar, and supporting document by the American Family Physicians. 

Here is what it says. 

Because no individual therapy has consistent benefit, a multimodal treatment approach to chronic musculoskeletal pain is recommended. Many nonpharmacologic, noninvasive treatment approaches yield small to moderate improvement and can be used with pharmacologic or more invasive modalities

  • Systematic reviews and guidelines support the effectiveness of various forms of exercise in improving pain and function in patients with chronic pain.
  • Spinal manipulation leads to a small benefit for chronic neck and low back pain. 
  • Cognitive behavior therapy and mindfulness techniques appear to be effective for small to moderate short- and long-term improvement of chronic low back pain. 
  • Cognitive behavior therapy may also be effective for small short- and intermediate-term improvement of fibromyalgia
  • Acupuncture has a small to moderate benefit for low back pain and small benefit for nonpain fibromyalgia symptoms. 
  • Massage or myofascial release yields a small improvement in low back pain, hip and knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia.
  • Low reactive level laser therapy may provide short-term relief of chronic neck and low back pain, and ultrasound may provide short-term pain relief for knee osteoarthritis.
  • Multidisciplinary rehabilitation may be effective for short- and at least intermediate-term improvement in pain and function for chronic low back pain and fibromyalgia. 

Against a vitalist’s best recommendations, they conclude the abstract with this line, “Patients should be encouraged to engage in a variety of therapies aligned with their preferences and motivation.”

You know….because everyone’s different. Everyone heals differently. Everyone responds to different therapies differently. Not everyone just needs a 30 second adjustment and sent out the door. 

All just a part of trying to get our profession to level up. That’s all. 

Item #2

Item number 2 today is called “Trends in Insurance Coverage for Complementary Health Care Services” by Whedon et. Al. (2) and published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine on October 8 of 2020 and that’s just hot enough for our favorite soundbite folks. 

Why They Did It

Complementary health care professionals deliver a substantial component of clinical services in the United States, but insurance coverage for many such services may be inadequate. The objective of this project was to follow up on an earlier single-year study with an evaluation of trends in reimbursement for complementary health care services over a 7-year period.

How They Did It

  • The authors employed a retrospective serial cross-sectional design to analyze health insurance claims for services provided by licensed acupuncturists, chiropractors, and naturopaths in New Hampshire (NH) from 2011 to 2017.
  • They restricted the analyses to claims in nonemergent outpatient settings
  • They evaluated by year the likelihood of reimbursement, as compared with primary care physicians as the gold standard.

What They Found

  • The total number of clinical services claimed was 26,725 for acupuncture, 8317 for naturopathic medicine, 2,539,144 for chiropractic, and 1,860,271 for primary care.
  • Initially, likelihood of reimbursement for naturopathic physicians was higher relative to primary care physicians, but was lower from 2014 onward
  • Odds of reimbursement for both acupuncture and chiropractic claims remained lower throughout the study period
  • In 2017, as compared with primary care the likelihood of reimbursement was 77% lower for acupuncturists, 72% lower for chiropractors, and 64% lower for naturopaths.

Wrap It Up

The likelihood of reimbursement for complementary health care services is significantly lower than that for primary care physicians in NH. Lack of insurance coverage may result in reduced patient access to such services.

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

Bibliography

1. Flynn DM. Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Nonpharmacologic, Noninvasive Treatments. Am Fam Physician. 2020 Oct 15;102(8):465-477. PMID: 33064421

2. James M. Whedon, Serena Bezdjian, Justin M. Goehl, and Louis A. Kazal.The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.Oct 2020.966-969.http://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2020.0078

 

 

 

Living With Chronic Pain, Screen Time, & Low Back Pain Delivery

CF 169: Living With Chronic Pain, Screen Time, & Low Back Pain Delivery

Today we’re going to talk about living well with chronic pain, screen time, and changing the delivery of low back pain care.

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

 

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

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OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #169

Now if you missed last week’s episode, we were joined by a couple of key players in the Texas Chiropractors’ fight against the Texas Medical Association for the right to diagnose patients, treat the Neuromusculoskeletal system rather than just the musculoskeletal system, and the right to perform VONT testing. All in one court attack. And we won after losing twice. It’s crazy. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

I’ve talked in the last 3-4 weeks how my life has become complicated and how I’m working through it slowly. This week feels like it’s leveling out a little. I hate to say that and jinx it but I’m a glass is a half full type of dude. 

Let’s start with a new one though that’s stressing me out a little and may pertain to some of you as well. I’ve started getting some trickles of complaints here and there on one of my staff members. A key staff member. Now, what do you do when that happens? First, it probably depends on the complaints, wouldn’t you agree?

If they’re egregious, well then they gotta go. These aren’t. These are more personality conflicts and they’re from females. I’ve never had a male complain about her. So, what’s going on there?

Second, if they’re not necessarily fire-able offenses, what do we do to correct them? Are they just strictly personality-driven and there’s nothing we can do to change the inherent behavior of a person? Or….can she be trained to suppress a certain aspect of her nature? If it’s built into her nature that is.

I buy into staff. I care about staff. On this, I’m in no hurry to get rid of an employee. Not at all. Mostly because she’s really good at a lot of key aspects of her job. Like….REALLY good. I’m rooting for her. I want her to succeed. 

For that reason, I have found some training for her to do. I want her to have every tool at her disposal that I can provide to give her the chance to succeed and do well. Not everyone is a natural. Sometimes we need training. Sometimes people don’t even realize certain aspects of their personality are off-putting to others. 

I’m sure I have certain off-putting parts of my personality. Just nobody ever tells me about it. Either because I’m the doctor in the office, or I’m the boss in the office, or because I’m 6’4” and big as hell. 

Anyway, we are getting her some training, supporting her, and keeping our fingers crossed because she’s a hard worker, she’s smart, and I think she can be a valuable part of our team.

Now, for the good stuff…..Last week I mentioned my pickup dying. 

Always get a second opinion on your vehicle when they tell you that you need a new engine for $6500 because I remembered a good friend of mine is a mechanic. We took it to him and it turns out it just need an oil pump and parts and labor ran us about $800. No sweat. I’m back up and running. 

The computer that contained my entire life was able to be backed up just before its demise so the new one is getting up and running. My old programs are getting up and running. And my life is returning to some sense of normal as more and more of the computer and the software starts to behave the way it is supposed to behave. 

So, yes, we have valleys and peaks but hold on and try to enjoy the ride. We are going through the medical integration slowly but surely. We have found our medical director. He’s been one of my long-time friends and actually used to be a chiropractor so it’s perfect. He knows me well, knows how I treat patients, and knows how I approach healthcare. I think it’s an amazing fit. 

Now, we are searching for a nurse practitioner to help us make it all happen. Here’s the key on that though, it has to be someone that fits my personality and my approach. It has to be an NP that doesn’t mind learning from a damn chiropractor if you know what I mean. If it’s someone that sees chiropractors as lowly servants, well that won’t work out at all now, will it? I’d rather lose $20,000 than put up with something like that. 

But if it’s someone that is open and eager to learn about the biopsychosocial aspect of pain, communicating correctly with patients, and things of that nature, then we probably have a fit. For example, some NPs can be told that the Canadian Medical Association Journal published a systematic review where 13 of 14 papers showed no effect for using gabapentin in radiculopathy. They can get that info and ignore it. That’s not the NP for me. 

On the other hand, they can see the paper and say to themselves, “Maybe we don’t want to prescribe anti-convulsants for radicular pain after all.” THAT’S my kind of NP.  That’s who I’m looking for. As always, I’ll let you know how it goes. 

But, the long and short of it is, we’re getting past the loss of the office manager, all of the big oopsies are starting to get sorted out, we have big stuff still on the worry plate but life is starting to retreat from the danger zone. The crisis zone if you will. It’s still on high alert but the alarm bells are going silent again. Thank God. 

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Item #1

Our first one today is called ““Living Well with Chronic Pain”: Integrative Pain Management via Shared Medical Appointments” by Znidarsic et. Al. (1) and published in Pain Medicine in January of 2021….dammit, it’s hot. 

I want to point out that the first three listed authors on this paper were a DO and two PhDs and out of 18 authors, there was only one DC on the list. In addition, several of the authors were MDs. Three of them to be exact. 

Why They Did It

To evaluate the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary, nonpharmacological, integrative approach that uses shared medical appointments to improve health-related quality of life and reduce opioid medication use in patients with chronic pain.

How They Did It

  • Retrospective, pre-post review of “Living Well with Chronic Pain” shared medical appointments (August 2016 through May 2018)
  • The appointments included eight 3-hour-long visits held once per week at an outpatient wellness facility.
  • It included patients with chronic, non–cancer-related pain.
  • Patients received evaluation and evidence-based therapies from a team of integrative and lifestyle medicine professionals, as well as education about nonpharmacological therapeutic approaches, the etiology of pain, and the relationship of pain to lifestyle factors
  • Experiential elements focused on the relaxation techniques of meditation, yoga, breathing, and hypnotherapy, while patients also received acupuncture, acupressure, massage, cognitive behavioral therapy, and chiropractic education
  • Patients self-reported data via the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS-57) standardized questionnaire.
  • 178 participants completed the PROMIS-57 questionnaire at the first and the last visits

What They Found

  • Statistically significant improvements in all domains were observed between the pre-intervention and post-intervention scores
  • Average opioid use decreased nonsignificantly over the 8-week intervention, but the lower rate of opioid use was not sustained at 6 and 12 months follow-up.

Wrap It Up

Patients suffering from chronic pain who participated in a multidisciplinary, nonpharmacological treatment approach delivered via shared medical appointments experienced reduced pain and improved measures of physical, mental, and social health without increased use of opioid pain medications.

Item #2

This one is called “Association Between Screen Time and Children’s Performance on a Developmental Screening Test” by Madigan et. al. (2) and published in JAMA Pediatrics on January 28, 2019. Not all that hot. Little steamy but not enough for my favorite soundbite. Unfortunately. 

I’ve highlighted some of these screen time posts before because they just make me crazy and I have to say, I’m guilty of having my kid on electronics years ago. And I’ve spent the last 15 or so years trying to keep them off of the electronics. We all make mistakes and turning our kids over to electronics is one of the biggest I think.

Why They Did It

The authors wanted to answer the question, “Is increased screen time associated with poor performance on children’s developmental screening tests?”

How They Did It

  • This was a longitudinal cohort study using a 3-wave, cross-lagged panel model in 2441 mothers and children in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, drawn from the All Our Families study.
  • Data were available when children were aged 24, 36, and 60 months.
  • Data were collected between October 20, 2011, and October 6, 2016. So…5 years.
  • At age 24, 36, and 60 months, children’s screen-time behavior (total hours per week) and developmental outcomes (Ages and Stages Questionnaire, Third Edition) were assessed via maternal report.

What They Found

A random-intercepts, cross-lagged panel model revealed that higher levels of screen time at 24 and 36 months were significantly associated with poorer performance on developmental screening tests at 36 months and 60 months.

Wrap It Up

The results of this study support the directional association between screen time and child development. Excessive screen time can impinge on children’s ability to develop optimally; it is recommended that pediatricians and health care practitioners guide parents on appropriate amounts of screen exposure and discuss potential consequences of excessive screen use.

Item #3

This last one is called “Transforming low back pain care delivery in the United States” by George et. al. (3) and published in Pain in December of 2020 and that’s a stout stack of steam stuff right there. This paper has our friend and previous guest, Dr. Christine Goertz, on it. She is amazing so I can only assume the rest of these authors are as well.

They say, “Low back pain (LBP) continues to be a challenging condition to manage effectively. Recent guideline recommendations stress providing non-pharmacological care early, limiting diagnostic testing, and reducing exposure to opioid pain medications. However, there has been little uptake of these guideline recommendations by providers, patients or health systems, resulting in care that is neither effective nor safe. This paper describes the framework for an evidence-based pathway that would transform service delivery for LBP in the United States by creating changes that facilitate the delivery of guideline adherent care.”

They’re saying that the guidelines and the recommendations are there but people aren’t listening. On both sides in my estimation. You have MDs going straight to shots and surgery and even the ones that are open to referral are just going straight to the PT. If the PT fails, then it’s shots and surgery rather than spinal manipulative therapy, or laser, or yoga, or maybe the PT wasn’t good at diagnosing the issue and providing targeted exercise. 

On the other hand, we have chiropractors moving bones when they should be stabilized. Or ordering x-rays over and over and over. Or treating 100 times for a curve problem that probably isn’t that big of a problem. 

They go on to say, “An evidence-informed clinical service pathway would be intentionally structured to include; a) direct linkages to community and population-based resources that facilitate self-management, b) foundational LBP care that is appropriate for all seeking care, c) individualized LBP care for those who have persistent symptoms, and d) specialized LBP care for instances when advanced diagnostics and intensive treatments are indicated.”

“There is an urgent need to transform LBP care by optimizing clinical care pathways focused on multiple opportunities for non-pharmacological treatments, carefully considering the escalation of care, and facilitating self-management.” 

We have chiropractors telling people to come to see them weekly to ward off disease, build the immune system, and things of that nature. That’s creating dependency on the clinic and it is not supported by any research. Certainly not in the context that so many vitalist chiropractors yell out and are so obnoxious about. Patients need to be taught at-home self-management techniques to deal with their pain. The rest is unnecessary noise. 

They close with this, “Such approaches have the potential to increase patient access to guideline adherent LBP care as an alternative to opioids, unwarranted diagnostic tests, and unnecessary surgery.”

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

 

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

 

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. 

And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. 

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

  1. Josie Znidarsic, DO, Kellie N Kirksey, PhD, Stephen M Dombrowski, PhD, Anne Tang, MS, Rocio Lopez, MS, Heather Blonsky, MAS, Irina Todorov, MD, Dana Schneeberger, PhD, Jonathan Doyle, MCS, Linda Libertini, Starkey Jamie, LAC, Tracy Segall, LMT, Andrew Bang, DC, Kathy Barringer, LISW, Bar Judi, CYTERYT 500, Jane Pernotto Ehrman, MEd, RCHES, Michael F Roizen, MD, Mladen Golubić, MD, PhD, “Living Well with Chronic Pain”: Integrative Pain Management via Shared Medical Appointments, Pain Medicine, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2021, Pages 181–190, https://doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnaa418
  2. Madigan S, Browne D, Racine N, Mori C, Tough S. Association Between Screen Time and Children’s Performance on a Developmental Screening Test. JAMA Pediatr. 2019;173(3):244–250. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.5056
  3. George SZ, Goertz C, Hastings SN, Fritz JM. Transforming low back pain care delivery in the United States. Pain. 2020 Dec;161(12):2667-2673. doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001989. PMID: 32694378; PMCID: PMC7669560.

Dry Needling, Types of Exercise Count, Motor Skills For Chronic Back, and Blood Pressure & Dementi

CF 166: Dry Needling, Types of Exercise Count, Motor Skills For Chronic Back, and Blood Pressure & Dementia

Today we’re going to talk about Dry Needling, how the types of exercising count in the long run, we talk about Motor Skills For Chronic Back Pain, and we wrap it up with a paper on Blood Pressure & Dementia

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

 

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  

We’re the fun kind of research. The AC/DC, Motley Crew, Metallica kind of research. 

Not the stuffy, high-brow, Beethoven and Mozart kind of research. 

We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #166 

Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about chiropractors working on kids. A controversial topic in some areas of the land and some professions don’t like chiropractors doing so. We talk about it. Check it out. You might learn something

Keep up with the class.  

On the personal end of things…..

Alright, if you listen regularly, you know I just lost my office manager of over 11 years to a little higher paying job. 

You know that my main computer that contains my whole life decided to take a dirt nap. It’s dead now. 

You know I have been up on the ropes a little here lately with slower numbers and all so let’s get into the nitty gritty here and see if we can make lemonade our of a crappy bunch of lemons, shall we?

Let’s start with the manager taking an exit. We can make these things positive or negative. I choose to make it a positive. Think about it; after 11 years, this person was by far my most highly paid employee. Probably overpaid honestly because I was trying to keep her happy. 

She had some difficulties financially at one point a couple of years ago so my wife and I created a marketing position for her so that we could justify paying her quite a bit more money per month while getting some marketing benefit out of it as well. 

So, not only was she highly paid for the office work, in addition, she made a good amount with the marketing side too. So, her leaving is an impact for sure. Not to mention the fact that she’s my buddy. She’s basically family. So it was an impact professionally but a bit personally. 

Here’s the thing though; do we let that paralyze us or do we make it positive? I make things positive when I can. Where are the positives here? 

Well, first thing is….I’m going to save a TON of money. Even when I get her replacement hired, I’m still getting about $1800 raise every month. Who the hell doesn’t want that kind of raise in their lives? Yes please, may I have another?

Also, with her having been out a bunch marketing, the other girls know how to do everything around the office that she used to do. That’s a big benefit. 

So, do we sit on that money or do we invest it? I invest. Remember, my ultimate goal is growth to the point I can remove myself and we do that be integrating and replacing me while making sure there are enough of alternatives to provide a comfortable retirement. 

Investing that money means it’s time to get off my tookus and integrate my practice. I’ve talked about it for years but never pulled the trigger. It’s time now and that’s what I’m doing. 

There is also the option of owning a Rural Health Clinic. That is on the table as well and I’ve got a call set up on Thursday to explore that option as well. 

Let’s say the RHC isn’t viable in Texas. OK, integration with the nurse prac is the path. I have an attorney in place and waiting on my to set it all up and I have a consulting company set up to help me get there. 

Here’s what I love about how life has created me. The best way to make sure I do something is to tell me that I can’t. The best way to see what I can do is to underestimate me or put me on the ropes and throw a few jabs. That’s when I tend to come out firing. 

I think we have to approach life like that every day but most definitely when life takes its jabs at our rib cage or our nethers. 

Instead of taking it, absorbing it, and letting it work us, come out firing on all cylinders. Prove yourself worthy of the things you really really desire 

Now, that doesn’t mean be stupid and financially dangerous. I take measured risks. I never jump off of cliffs. But, I have a pile of PPP money to pay employees and I just got an unexpected raise so now is the time to pounce. I may not have a chance quite like this again so let’s make it happen. And I will. 

The new computer will be here tomorrow. I’ve been without it for a couple of weeks now but, overall it hasn’t been too miserable. Macs have this cool thing called iCloud and a lot of my info including browser book marks and anything I had moved over just to my desktop screen….they’re all in iCloud so I started bringing my MacBook laptop to work and signed in and BAM….it was all there. I’m missing some important stuff but overall, I’ve been able to do the things I need to do. Including keeping up with this podcast. 

The big thing I’m behind on right now is keeping stats because it’s all in my computer memory. I’m working on a solution for that. For me and for you so keep your eyes and ears on the lookout for that in the coming months. You’ll see what I mean when I get it ready for you. That’s another good reason to be in our private Facebook group. I’ll be announcing it and the need for some beta testers and I’ll only make that available in the private group so make sure you’re in there for that special opportunity. 

In other big news, I got a call from Dr. James Lehman and he shared with me the existence of a Diplomate program called Forensics. I have to admit I’d never heard of it. He told me it’s a subspecialty of the Neuromusculoskeletal Diplomate. Which I already have. And he said that since I already have it, then to get the Forensics Diplomate, all I’d need to do is get 100 additional hours. It would break down into 60 hours online through ChiroCredit, 20 hours taking the AMA’s Impairment Rating course, and 20 hours in a conference in Chicago. 

Once completed, I would have the Diplomate in Forensics as well as the Neuromusculoskeletal Diplomate and I’d be able to command some hefty prices serving as a court expert and consultant. 

Well, that fit into the retirement plan doesn’t it? It’s not exactly retiring but it is getting our of the day to day, in-person tasks of daily patient treatment. Which is the goal eventually. And it fits that path. 

So, as you guessed, I’m signed up and have already knocked out about 2 hours of the 60. If you’ve been a listener since the start, you know that I gave you updates on the Neuromusculoskeletal Diplomate as I went through it. I told you all about it and what I was working on and learning. 

I plan on doing some of the same here for you on the Forensics thing. That way you’ll be able to learn more about it and might consider it for yourself. Plus, I’ll have Dr. Lehman come on in a future podcast and share more about it. 

The goal for the profession is to eventually get more and more chiropractors exploring the Diplomates and specializing. Raising the game of this profession one chiropractor at a time. 

CHIROUP 

Item #1

This first one is called “Is Dry Needling Effective for the Management of Spasticity, Pain, and Motor Function in Post-Stroke Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” by Fernandez-de-las-Penas et. al. (1) and published in Pain Medicine on December 18, 2020 and that’s a lot hot in the pot!

Why They Did It

To evaluate the effects of muscle dry needling alone or combined with other interventions on post-stroke spasticity (muscle tone), related pain, motor function, and pressure sensitivity.

How They Did It

  • Electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials including post-stroke patients where at least one group received dry needling and outcomes were collected on spasticity and related pain
  • Secondary outcomes included motor function and pressure pain sensitivity
  • Data were extracted by two reviewers
  • 7 studies were included

What They Found

  • The meta-analysis found significantly large effect sizes of dry needling for reducing spasticity, post-stroke pain, and pressure pain sensitivity as compared with a comparative group at short-term follow-up
  • The effect on spasticity was found mainly in the lower extremity
  • No effect on spasticity was seen at 4 weeks
  • No significant effect on motor function
  • The risk of bias was generally low, but the imprecision of the results downgraded the level of evidence.

Wrap It Up

The authors ended it by saying, “Moderate evidence suggests a positive effect of dry needling on spasticity (muscle tone) in the lower extremity in post-stroke patients. The effects on related pain and motor function are inconclusive.”

Item #2

Our second on today is called “Effect of Motor Skill Training in Functional Activities vs Strength and Flexibility Exercise on Function in People With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial” by Van Dillen, et. Al (2) and published in JAMA Neurology on December 28, 2020 and it’s a lot hot in the pot as well. 

Why They Did It

For people with chronic, nonspecific low back pain, does person-specific motor skill training in functional activities result in better short-term and long-term outcomes than strength and flexibility exercise? You all know I love me some chronic pain research! I gobble it up like meat lover’s pizza. 

How They Did It

  • Single-blind, randomized clinical trial of people with chronic, nonspecific LBP
  • 149 participants
  • 12-month follow-up
  • Recruitment spanned December 2013 to August 2016
  • Testing and treatment were performed at an academic medical center
  • Participants received 6 weekly 1-hour sessions of motor skill training in functional activity performance or strength and flexibility exercise of the trunk and lower limbs
  • Half of the participants in each group received up to 3 booster treatments 6 months following treatment.
  • The primary outcome was the modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (MODQ) score (0%-100%) evaluated immediately, 6 months, and 12 months following treatment.

Wrap It Up

“People with chronic low back pain who received motor skill training had greater short-term and long-term improvements in function than those who received strength and flexibility exercise. 

Person-specific motor skill training in functional activities limited owing to low back pain should be considered in the treatment of people with chronic low back pain”

Item #3

Item 3 is called “Association of Physical Activity Intensity With Mortality A National Cohort Study of 403 681 US Adults” by Wang et. al. (3) and published in JAMA Internal Medicine on November 23, of 2020. It’s a skootch steamy, Sir!

Why They Did It

They asked the question, “Is vigorous physical activity associated with additional mortality risk reduction compared with moderate physical activity?” Great question. I’ve been working out but wouldn’t it be nice if moderate was just as effective as rigorous? I say it would be. So let’s see how it plays out. 

How They Did It

  • Cohort study
  • 403,681 adults from the National Health Interview Survey 1997-2013. Hello big, large sample size!
  • provided data on self-reported physical activity and were linked to the National Death Index records through December 31, 2015.
  • Statistical analysis was performed from May 15, 2018, to August 15, 2020.

Wrap It Up

“This study suggests that, for the same volume of moderate physical activity, a higher proportion of vigorous physical activity to total physical activity was associated with lower all-cause mortality. Clinicians and public health interventions should recommend 150 minutes or more per week of moderate physical activity but also advise on the potential benefits associated with vigorous physical activity to maximize population health.”

Dammit, looks like it’s as I feared. Vigorous is superior. Which honestly is pretty obvious but I was hoping for the keys to the kingdom with as little work as possible. 

Item #4

The last one is called “Association of Blood Pressure Lowering With Incident Dementia or Cognitive Impairment A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis” by Hughes, et. al. (4) and published in JAMA on May 19, of 2020 and I say it’s hot enough, fools. Stand back!

Why They Did It

The authors asked the question, “Is there an association between blood pressure lowering with antihypertensive therapy and the incidence of dementia or cognitive impairment?” 

We are answering so many good questions today, people!!

How They Did It

  • Meta-analysis 
  • Search of PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL for randomized clinical trials published from database inception through December 31, 2019, that evaluated the association of blood pressure lowering on cognitive outcomes
  • The control groups consisted of either placebo, alternative antihypertensive agents, or higher blood pressure targets.
  • Data were screened and extracted independently by 2 authors
  • The primary outcome was dementia or cognitive impairment. 
  • The secondary outcomes were cognitive decline and changes in cognitive test scores.

Wrap It Up

“In this meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials, blood pressure lowering with antihypertensive agents compared with control was significantly associated with a lower risk of incident dementia or cognitive impairment.”

So, besides stroke and other similar dangers, add dementia and cognitive abilities to the list of reasons to keep blood pressure in check. 

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store 

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

The Message 

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point: 

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact 

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect 

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website 

Home

Social Media Links 

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter 

YouTube 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

ITunes 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link 

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher: 

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn 

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host 

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

Bibliography

  1. César Fernández-de-las-Peñas, PT, PhD, Albert Pérez-Bellmunt, PT, PhD, Luis Llurda-Almuzara, PhD, Gustavo Plaza-Manzano, PT, PhD, Ana I De-la-Llave-Rincón, PT, PhD, Marcos J Navarro-Santana, PT, MSc, Is Dry Needling Effective for the Management of Spasticity, Pain, and Motor Function in Post-Stroke Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis, Pain Medicine, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2021, Pages 131–141, https://doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnaa392
  2. van Dillen LR, Lanier VM, Steger-May K, et al. Effect of Motor Skill Training in Functional Activities vs Strength and Flexibility Exercise on Function in People With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Neurol. Published online December 28, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2020.4821
  3. Wang Y, Nie J, Ferrari G, Rey-Lopez JP, Rezende LFM. Association of Physical Activity Intensity With Mortality: A National Cohort Study of 403 681 US Adults. JAMA Intern Med. 2021;181(2):203–211. doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.6331
  4. Hughes D, Judge C, Murphy R, et al. Association of Blood Pressure Lowering With Incident Dementia or Cognitive Impairment: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA. 2020;323(19):1934–1944. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4249

w/ Dr. Bobby Maybee – (Part Two) Everything Evidence-Based Chiropractic, Insight, Instruction, & Inspiration

CF 162: w/ Dr. Bobby Maybee – Everything Evidence-Based Chiropractic, Insight, Instruction, & Inspiration (Part Two)

Today we’re going to be joined by Dr. Bobby Maybee for Part Two of our conversation. Dr. Maybee is the leader and originator of the Forward Thinking Chiropractic Alliance and co-founder of the Chiropractic Success Academy. Full of insight, instruction, and inspiration. Stick around.

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

Subscribe button

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #162

Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about lumbar spinal fusion surgery. This was new, current, and very much in favor of conservative, non-pharmacological, nonsurgical care.. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

I have the second shot of the two vaccines coming up in two days. I had absolutely zero reaction to the first one. I keep hearing that the second is worse than the first. However, several of my friends that had a miserable first shot experience had a much more pleasant second shot experience. 

So, here’s to an easy second shot. If you’re not getting yours because you want to see if everyone else grows a forehead horn first, that’s reasonable. I don’t blame you. I’m a lone wolf in a sense. My business does not run without my presence. Therefore, I need to be here. I need to be healthy. So, the vaccine makes sense to me. 

I covered a book called Peak Performance for you in the last episode or two on relaxation and visualization. Further back, I talked about a book called Quit Like A Millionaire I would absolutely recommend. Wow, what a great book. I’ve told you about Back In Control by David Hanscum MD about chronic pain and the biopsychosocial side of it. That’s a book I recommend all of my chronic patients. Check it out. 

This episode, I’ll tell you about one I’m going down the path on by Tom Wheelwright called ‘Tax-Free Wealth: How to Build Massive Wealth by Permanently Lowering Your Taxes 

https://www.amazon.com/Tax-Free-Wealth-Permanently-Lowering-Advisors/dp/1937832058

It’s in the Rich Dad Poor Dad netword o fproducts and I can’t say enough about it. If you’re like me, you’re sending upwards of $100k to the IRS every year regardless of how much you try to not do just that. What if we could spend that money on building our business or businesses rather than sending it to Washington where we have a bunch of corrupt politicians that have no idea what compromise even means anymore?

Politicians that go into office middle to upper class but come out multi-millionaires. Yeah, I’m more interested in figuring out how to keep it at home and working for me instead of letting those knuckelheads decide what to do with my money. That’s a big hell no. 

That’s what this book is about. Tom will also tell you about his ‘Wealthability’ program that costs a hell of a lot of money. My wife and I are doing it. We just started. You know I’m always honest with you all and I’ll tell you how it goes. For the most part though, you get all the info you need inside his book. I’m just lazy and need someone to do it for me so that’s why I went with the program. 

Actually, I’m not lazy. I think listeners here know that I’m not lazy. I just have too many irons in the fire to figure it all out myself. That’s not where my talent lies. So, people like me have to pay people like them to give me their talent and expertise and it typically comes at a price. And it does. 

I’ll keep you updated. 

Alright, let’s get to the meat and taters here. We have Part Two coming up with THE Dr. Bobby Maybee of the Forward Thinking Chiropractic Alliance. First thing’s first, if for some reason you missed Part One last week, stop..collaborate and listen….Sorry, anyone from the 80s and 90s can’t say the word STOP without adding those words to the end…..Anyway. Stop and go listen to Part One with Dr. Maybee and then come back for Part Two

Just as a refresher from last week, I want to run through some key aspects of Dr. Maybee once more. 

Dr. Maybee initially began the Forward-Thinking Chiropractic Alliance (FTCA) in 2014 as an attempt to change the landscape and conversation of the chiropractic profession of social media.   

Since then the FTCA has gone on to create evidence-based content in a grass roots nature.  This content is typically for the internet, and in an educational format through continuing education courses, and is staunchly evidence based.  

Dr. Maybee hosts “Forward, The Podcast of the Forward-Thinking Chiropractic Alliance.”  As well, he was just elected Chair of the Oregon Board of Chiropractic Examiners Peer Review Committee, and is a member and supporter of the American Chiropractic Association.  

Dr. Maybee is a 2004 graduate of Western States Chiropractic College.  In his free time, he co manages a household of 5 children, 2 dogs Jett and Abbie, and a cat named Goober.

And the best reason we can ever have to thank someone for something, Dr. Maybee is a veteran of the US Air Force which no doubt lends itself to him being such a good and effective leader. 

Alright, let’s hop into Part Two and pick it up where we left off last week. 

  • What is your vision for the FTCA and what does the group to to move closer and closer to accomplishing them?
  • I was at the Forward 19 event in St Louis and really enjoyed it. Tell us about what goes into creating something like that? How do you pull it off?
  • Recently, I have been on a rant. I see vitalists say kooky stuff and I’m physically and mentally unable to ignore it. I have a recent episode on a guy that wants to teach other chiropractors how to treat 9 new patients and 99 established patients within three hours. Then I had an episode on the shake up of the WFC Research committee. As I mentioned in the episode, you were there in Berlin when it all started going sideways. Can you walk us through it all as far as you know it to be?
  • I think I’ve seen you vacillate on the topic of unity or not. Where do you stand on the whole deal? Is it possible the two sides can continue to live together? Or do you see groups like the Primary Spine Practitioner start to gain steam?
  • Tell us about the CSA that you and Dr. Kevin Christie have put together.

CHIROUP ADVERTISEMENT

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

Subscribe Button

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

Website

Home

Social Media Links

https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

Twitter

YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtc-IrhlK19hWlhaOGld76Q

iTunes

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing/id1331554445?mt=2

Player FM Link

https://player.fm/series/2291021

Stitcher:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-chiropractic-forward-podcast-chiropractors-practicing-through

TuneIn

https://tunein.com/podcasts/Health–Wellness-Podcasts/The-Chiropractic-Forward-Podcast-Chiropractors-Pr-p1089415/

About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

 

w/ Dr. Bobby Maybee – Everything Evidence-Based Chiropractic, Insight, Instruction, & Inspiration (Part One)

CF 161: w/ Dr. Bobby Maybee – Everything Evidence-Based Chiropractic, Insight, Instruction, & Inspiration (Part One)

Today we’re going to be joined by Dr. Bobby Maybee who is involved in so many things chiropractic but most notably he’s the leader of the Forward Thinking Chiropractic Alliance and co-founder of the Chiropractic Success Academy. This is going to be an excellent episode folks. Full of insight, instruction, and inspiration.  But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music.

Chiropractic evidence-based products

Integrating Chiropractors

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.22-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.33-AM-150x55.jpg

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Screen-Shot-2018-07-12-at-10.23.09-AM-150x55.jpg

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around.  We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers. I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.   If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #161 Now if you missed last week’s episode , we talked about lumbar spinal fusion surgery. This was new, current, and very much in favor of conservative, non-pharmacological, nonsurgical care.. Keep up with the class.  On the personal end of things….. I’d like to hear how some of you are busier than normal or how some of you have only dropped off a bit during COVID. I wrapped up my stats from 2020 and it was a bit of a blood bath around my joint if I’m being honest and I’m always honest with you all. That’s they only way we move forward. Honesty.  So, let’s cover a few of the key stats. By the way, if you’re not keeping good stats and measuring all of your office metrics, I can’t tell you what a mistake it is that you’re making. My office turned around when I started accurately tracking my metrics. How can you know where you’re going or measure success in a quantifiable way if you’re not measuring it? As you’ll find out more and more in the coming months, I’m very big on keeping stats because it turned my office around. I know the value. Anyway, let’s get to some of my take-aways from my 2020 stats. 

  • One of the big kickers for me is that my new patients were down 36.1% from 2019. Yeah, that hurt like hell, folks. That’s in spite of picking up in our marketing efforts, posting and boosting about our cleaning and disinfecting efforts, and growing our social media following. Our area was hit hard with COVID. On the New York Times site, Amarillo, TX at different times and even recently has been #13 nationwide in areas hit the hardest. At one time, we were #2 on their list of the areas with the most new cases. People just did not feel comfortable going anywhere around here at different times during the year. Some times were more comfortable than others of course but overall….uncomfortable.
  • As a result of the new patient issue, my overall visit numbers suffered and were down 33.8%. So, we saw 33.8% less visits over the course of the year in 2020. When you consider the value of one visit in my office, well…..let’s just say that adds up to a considerable amount of income lost.
  • You’ll start to see a theme here when I tell you that my total services billed were down 36.6% and net services when we remove our write-offs sat at about 40% down. Ugh, right? But, we worked hard on our billing, of course. When you have extra time, you turn to billing and collections efforts. As a result, our total collections were only down 25.4%. Funny how that happens. 
  • We could go through a whole bunch of different metrics but I have an amazing guest today we need to get to. The most important stat is the final overall total. When we include all of the things that make us money like chiropractic, rehab, laser, decompression, acupuncture, massage, and on and on….when we combine it all, our total collections across the board were down 25.4% in 2020. While that’s a tough pill, I’m not alone. Many of you have had the same difficulties. Many of you have had it worse. And I’m sorry. It’s been difficult for us all. But the good news is that I think it’s lightening up and if improvement and progress makes us all feel good, it won’t take much to improve and show progress over 2020. Will it? I think not so here’s to all good things in 2021. Let’s get all of our practices back on track and help some folks get out of pain and avoid surgery. 

Now, without further adieu, let’s get to our guest today.  Today we are joined by the always interesting and talented Dr. Bobby Maybee hailing from the Pacific Northwest. Portland, Oregon to be exact. Dr. Maybee initially began the Forward-Thinking Chiropractic Alliance (FTCA) in 2014 as an attempt to change the landscape and conversation of the chiropractic profession of social media.   

Since then the FTCA has gone on to create evidence-based content in a grass roots nature.  This content is typically for the internet, and in an educational format through continuing education courses, and is staunchly evidence based.   Dr. Maybee hosts “Forward, The Podcast of the Forward-Thinking Chiropractic Alliance.”  As well, he was just elected Chair of the Oregon Board of Chiropractic Examiners Peer Review Committee, and is a member and supporter of the American Chiropractic Association.  

Dr. Maybee is a 2004 graduate of Western States Chiropractic College.  In his free time, he co manages a household of 5 children, 2 dogs Jett and Abbie, and a cat named Goober. And the best reason we can ever have to thank someone for something, Dr. Maybee is a veteran of the US Air Force which no doubt lends itself to him being such a good and effective leader. 

Welcome to the show Bobby, tell me how Portland is this morning.

How’s the weather? 

Introduction

  • Tell me your chiropractic story. Why chiropractic for you?
  • Tell me what got you to the place where you are the expert in the clinic that you are. What experiences or certifications built that person?
  • Tell me about your practice in Portland
  • With as many kiddos as you have and as many things as you’re involved in, what does a typical week look like for you.
  • How did the FTCA get started?
  • I see here and there online that some vitalists have really started to make the term ‘evidence-based’ a keyword, a trigger word, or a point of conterntion. Have you noticed that as well and how do you think a healthcare profession come to mock evidence and research?
  • What is your vision for the FTCA and what does the group to to move closer and closer to accomplishing them?
  • I was at the Forward 19 event in St Louis and really enjoyed it. Tell us about what goes into creating something like that? How do you pull it off?
  • Recently, I have been on a rant. I see vitalists say kooky stuff and I’m physically and mentally unable to ignore it. I have a recent episode on a guy that wants to teach other chiropractors how to treat 9 new patients and 99 established patients within three hours. Then I had an episode on the shake up of the WFC Research committee. As I mentioned in the episode, you were there in Berlin when it all started going sideways. Can you walk us through it all as far as you know it to be?
  • I think I’ve seen you vacillate on the topic of unity or not. Where do you stand on the whole deal? Is it possible the two sides can continue to live together? Or do you see groups like the Primary Spine Practitioner start to gain steam?
  • Tell us about the CSA that you and Dr. Kevin Christie have put together.

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Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it. Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week.  Store Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com.     

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Integrating Chiropractors

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The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots. When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few. It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient. And, if the patient treats preventativly after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point: At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints…. That’s Chiropractic!

Contact Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes.  Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms.  We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward. Website https://www.chiropracticforward.com

Social Media Links https://www.facebook.com/chiropracticforward/

Chiropractic Forward Podcast Facebook GROUP https://www.facebook.com/groups/1938461399501889/

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About the Author & Host Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger  

The Failure Of Lumbar Fusion Surgery

CF 160: The Failure Of Lumbar Fusion Surgery

Today we’re going to be talking all about lumbar fusion surgery and my growing disdain for the procedure. 

But first, here’s that sweet sweet bumper music

 

OK, we are back and you have found the Chiropractic Forward Podcast where we are making evidence-based chiropractic fun, profitable, and accessible while we make you and your patients better all the way around. 

We’re the fun kind of research. Not the stuffy, high-brow kind of research. We’re research talk over a couple of beers.

I’m Dr. Jeff Williams and I’m your host for the Chiropractic Forward podcast.  

If you haven’t yet I have a few things you should do. 

  • Like our Facebook page, 
  • Join our private Facebook group and interact, and then 
  • go review our podcast on iTunes and other podcast platforms. 
  • We also have an evidence-based brochure and poster store at chiropracticforward.com
  • While you’re there, join our weekly email newsletter. 

You have found yourself smack dab in the middle of Episode #160

Now if you missed last week’s episode, we talked about setting yourself apart in the way you treat migraines. This was an excellent episode that has no choice but to make you better. Make sure you don’t miss that info. Keep up with the class. 

On the personal end of things…..

I watched an ESPN 30 For 30 the other night. It was on Jim Valvano and his North Carolina State Wolfpack that won the national championship in basketball in 1983 I believe. It was such an unlikely story and some of his techniques were a bit wonky. 

For example, he used to make the team practice cutting down the nets from the goals after winning the championship. Far before it was ever even in the realm of possibility. The players said that was more than a little weird at first but that they came to enjoy it and it was just a part of goal-setting and visualizing. 

Visualization is such a big part of a mental process we can, and should, partake in. I myself forget to think to do it. Even though I know how impactful visualization can be. 

I can give you a personal example where visualization came in handy for me. I was a mediocre discus and shot put thrower in high school. OK, probably above average to be honest but I don’t want to pump my own tires too much. 

I ended up my junior year at 150’. That throw might win district but won’t do a lot for a guy at a regional meet. 

When my senior year came around, in the early Spring, I began getting recruited by a lot of colleges. Mostly DII colleges. One of the coaches recruiting me knew about my discus and shot put throwing. He recommended a book. It was called Peak Performance: Mental Training Techniques Of The world’s Greatest Athletes by Charles A. Garfield. 

This book was about relaxation and visualization techniques of the top athletes in the world. It was like nothing I’d ever read. Now, this was back in 1990. They may have improved visualization and relaxation techniques since then but I’m telling you, this book punted me into a different stratosphere on this stuff. I’ll put a link to it on biblio.com in the show notes for this episode. Go check it out. 

https://www.biblio.com/book/peak-performance-mental-training-techniques-worlds/d/1362768092?aid=frg&currency_id=1&gclid=Cj0KCQiAlsv_BRDtARIsAHMGVSZ40_eKAIMbAHTRPRIUrdGXJN5c6n4SG74XgCEYiPpihaJGbuny2QgaAmgHEALw_wcB

Anyway, while I was throwing in the low 160s in the discus and low 50-foot range in the shot put, when I got this book it was toward the middle of the season so it was a bit rushed. But I dove in immediately. 

Within two weeks I was at 168’ and then at the end of the season, I won state in Texas (not an easy feat with a state of 25 million people)  with a personal meet best of 176’ 4 1/2 inches. I beat my best throw of my junior year by 26’. Not only that but I went to state in the shot put. Most definitely my weak event and threw my personal best there. It was my best throw by about a foot which is a huge jump in that event ending up at 55’. Just a couple of inches from our school record. Not an accomplishment that would have ever happened without this book. 

i apologize. I went out on a tangent a bit there but I’m talking about this book and this visualization topic because it’s real and I know it can make a difference in your life and your practice. 

Listeners of this podcast know I’m not a hippy-dippy kind of dude. This isn’t a hippy-dippy thing. It’s real and I’ve experienced it. This book is meant for business as well. I encourage you to check it out yourself. 

That 30 For 30 is my favorite. It’s very inspiring and he has some great quotes in the show. You can Google his quotes as well to save some time. But, in one part, he was quoting Ralph Waldo Emerson and the quote was, “Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.”

For many of us, 2020 and COVID stole our enthusiasm. If you take Emerson at his word here, then that would mean that 2020 and COVID also stole our greatness. 

I want to encourage the listeners of the Chiropractic Forward Podcast to get your enthusiasm back. Get your greatness back. Do it right now. Make it a priority. Make it a foundation of your practice this month and let’s see what happens. 

Pass it down to your staff. Keep them pumped up. Even when or if numbers are down. My numbers are down. I’ve made no secret about that. But around here, we’re going to make enthusiasm a key ingredient of our values. Along with honesty, integrity, ethics, love, fun, and being evidence-based and patient-centered. When we add enthusiasm into that mix, I think we have a winning concoction. 

This discussion portion was meant to only deal with enthusiasm but I got to talking about Jimmy V and his visualization efforts and like an ADD guy, I saw a squirrel and just went that direction. Thank you for indulging me. I hope you found something helpful in it all. 

 em today. I first want to say that I am not against surgery for the right person and the right issue. If it’s needed and the last resort, well why the hell not? But a stat I came across a year or so ago said that out of the 56 million back pain sufferers in our country, only about 5% of them actually, truly, clinically need surgery. 

Then, as you’ll see, when you have something as invasive and impactful on life as lumbar fusion being performed so often with no improved overall outcomes on the back end of it all….well, don’t you have to be responsible and step back and take another look at that and ask yourself, what are we as surgeons doing this for, and should we continue?

Item #1

This first one today is called “Is Lumbar Fusion Necessary for Chronic Low Back Pain Associated with Degenerative Disk Disease? A Meta-Analysis” by Xu et. al. (Xu W 2020) and published in World Neurosurgery on November 27, 2020. 

Hot potato, hot potato, get ‘em while they’re good and hot!

Why They Did It

The authors wanted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lumbar fusion versus nonoperative care for the treatment of chronic low back pain associated with degenerative disk disease.

Remember this is a meta-analysis. It’s right up there at the top of the research pyramid with systematic reviews. Meaning….it’s good stuff.

How They Did It

  • They did a comprehensive duplicate electronic database search that included PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. 
  • They took studies published up to June 30, 2020
  • The main outcomes including clinical results, complications, and all-cause additional surgeries were presented in the form of short and long-term follow-up results. 
  • Six prospective studies involving 159 patients for short-term follow-up and 675 for long-term follow-up were included.

What They Found

  • The 2 interventions exhibited little difference in regard to short- and long-term Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale scores for back and leg pain, 
  • Lumbar fusion might bring about lower additional surgery rate 
  • Lumbar fusion might bring about a higher complication rate in the long term.

Wrap It Up

“The present meta-analysis determined that fusion surgery was no better than nonoperative treatment in terms of the pain and disability outcomes at either short- or long-term follow-up. It is necessary for clinicians to weigh the risk of complications associated with fusion surgery against additional surgeries after nonoperative treatment. Considering lax patient inclusion criteria in the existing randomized clinical trials, the result needs to be further confirmed by high-quality research with stricter selection criteria in the future.”

So, since we know systematic reviews and meta-analyses are like computers, then we know that they are only as good as the data you put into it. What you put into it determines what you get out of it. If they haven’t done a lot of quality research on low back fusions, well then they won’t have a lot of good quality information to assemble a meta-analysis. Right? 

When we look at 6 studies with 159 patients for the short-term part and we have 675 patients for the long-term…..I’m not a researcher but, to me, that sure doesn’t seem like a huge sample size. Certainly not when you consider the number of lumbar fusions happening around the world every single day. For such an expensive and invasive surgery, you’d sure think there’d be more to go on out there for a project like this. Is it just me?

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Item #1 was a new paper. Now I want to re-visit a couple of papers we have covered on the podcast before. One in episode 144 and one all the way back in Episode 54. 

Item #2

Item #2 is titled “Lumbar Spine Fusion: What Is The Evidence?” by Harris et. al(Harris I 2018). and published in the Journal of Internal Medicine in 2018. 

Basically, in this paper, they say that lumbar spinal fusion is common and associated with the high cost and a risk of serious adverse events. They state that they aim to summarize systematic reviews on the effectiveness of lumbar spine fusion for most diagnoses. 

Of important note is where they say that they found NO high-quality systematic reviews and the risk of bias of the randomized controlled trials they found was generally high. For something as serious as lumbar fusion surgery. Where they cut into the body, take two vertebrae that usually aren’t unstable on each other, and then drive screws into them and affix hardware to fuse them together forever and ever amen. 

No high-quality systematic reviews for lumbar fusion surgery and the RCTs out there generally carry a high risk of bias. 

Doesn’t that just give you a warm fuzzy feeling inside when a surgery like lumbar fusion doesn’t have a lot backing it?

They go on to say that the available evidence doesn’t support a clinical benefit from lumbar fusion surgery compared to non-operative treatment or stabilization without fusion for thoracolumbar burst fractures. 

They say that surgical intervention for metastatic carcinoma of the spine associated with spinal cord compromise improves mobility and neurological outcome. That was based on a single trial. 

Item #3

This one we covered in episode 144 is called, “Surgery for chronic musculoskeletal pain: the question of evidence” authored by Harris et. al(Harris IA 2020). and published in Pain Journal in September of 2020.

Why They Did It 

They say that globally, the most common reasons surgery is performed relate to the musculoskeletal system, and outside of injury, the most common reasons pertain to arthritis and back or neck pain. AKA – chronic pain. Chronic pain has become a special interest of mine after going through the orthopedic diplomat last year. It’s fascinating. 

They say, “Although the surgical treatment of chronic pain generally relies on attributing pain to objective, often visible changes on imaging studies, the causes of chronic pain are more complex and are strongly influenced by psychosocial factors.” 

Things like Yellow Flags. Go look up yellow flags and Annie O’Connor’s book called World Of Pain please and thank you.  Annie will be speaking at the Texas Chiropractic Association’s Winter Conference on March 5-6. I encourage you to be watching out on www.chirotexas.org for more info because you’ll be able to take this seminar from anywhere in the world. And I recommend you do because my hero, Dr. Anthony Nicholson from Australia will be one of the presenters. Dr. Carlo Amendolia, I will be a speaker at this thing, Dr. Brandon Steele, and Dr. Jay Greenstein as well. This is quite the conference getting put together, folks. So make your plans. 

They say that surgeries like debridement of degenerative joints and things of that nature ignore the complexity of chronic pain. They look at surgery as purely mechanistic in nature with little to no involvement otherwise and the procedures often rely on observational evidence only, rather than rigorous, comparative trials.  

In addition, they say that when the trials have actually been performed for these surgeries have been mostly subjective and measurements are usually not blinded to reduce the bias of the outcomes.  

Who really wants to go under the knife for anything other than having a mole cut off when the procedures have not been thoroughly investigated, researched, and tested? 

Uh hell no. No thank you. 

This paper was written to demonstrate that observational evidence is not adequate when you consider the costs and risks of surgical intervention. They advocate that surgical procedures should undergo randomized controlled trials with blinding and showing statistical and clinically important symptomatic improvement when compared to no surgery at all.  

Well no duh. Who on Earth would put something into widespread use….surgically that is…..without doing their due diligence through research? Well…..evidently everyone in the medical profession from this.  

Ultimately in this paper, the goal here was to quantify what kind of support exists in the literature for some common procedures.  

How They Did It

  • The first thing to do was to identify the common procedures performed for chronic pain
  • Secondly, they had to identify the number of published RCTs comparing each procedure to a control group treated without that procedure
  • They did a search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials
  • Each paper was reviewed by two independent authors

What They Found

  • A very low proportion of the RCTs on the selected procedures compared the procedure to not performing the procedure. 64 from the more than 6,735 studies. Less than 1% if you’re keeping track. Is that not stunning? And infuriating?
  • Of those 64, only 9 were favorable to surgery. 
  • When considering individual surgical procedures, the majority of comparative trials did not favor surgery 
  • None of the studies using patient blinding for any procedure found it to be significantly better than not having the surgery at all. 

Wrap It Up We conclude that many common surgical procedures performed for musculoskeletal conditions causing chronic pain have not been subjected to randomized trials comparing them to not performing the procedure. 

Based on the observation that when such studies have been performed, only 14% (on average) showed a statistically significant and clinically important benefit to surgery; there is a need to produce such high-quality evidence to determine the effectiveness of many common surgical procedures.  

Furthermore, the production of high-quality evidence should be a requirement before widespread implementation, funding or professional acceptance of such procedures, rather than the current practice of either performing trials after procedures have become commonplace, or not performing comparative trials at all.” 

Wouldn’t you like to know that your mom’s spinal surgery procedure was fully vetted? It was researched against not doing it at all? They haven’t done that? 

Make memes and/or infographics from the sound bites I’ve given you here. You can use all of this stuff if you have a little imagination. 

Alright, that’s it. Y’all be safe. Keep changing our profession from your little corner of the world. Keep taking care of yourselves and everyone around you. Tough times are upon us but, the sun will shine again. Trust it, believe it, count on it.

Let’s get to the message. Same as it is every week. 

Store

Remember the evidence-informed brochures and posters at chiropracticforward.com. 

Subscribe Button

The Message

I want you to know with absolute certainty that when Chiropractic is at its best, you can’t beat the risk vs reward ratio because spinal pain is primarily a movement-related pain and typically responds better to movement-related treatment rather than chemical treatments like pills and shots.

When compared to the traditional medical model, research and clinical experience show us patients can get good to excellent results for headaches, neck pain, back pain, and joint pain to name just a few.

It’s safe and cost-effective can decrease surgeries & disability and we do it through conservative, non-surgical means with minimal hassle to the patient.

And, if the patient treats preventatively after initial recovery, we can usually keep it that way while raising the overall level of health!

Key Point:

At the end of the day, patients should have the guarantee of having the best treatment that offers the least harm. When it comes to non-complicated musculoskeletal complaints….

That’s Chiropractic!

Contact

Send us an email at dr dot williams at chiropracticforward.com and let us know what you think of our show and tell us your suggestions for future episodes. 

Feedback and constructive criticism is a blessing and so are subscribes and excellent reviews on podcast platforms. 

We know how this works by now. If you value something, you have to share it, interact with it, review it, talk about it from time to time, and actively hit a few buttons to support it here and there when asked. It really does make a big difference. 

Connect

We can’t wait to connect with you again next week. From the Chiropractic Forward Podcast flight deck, this is Dr. Jeff Williams saying upward, onward, and forward.

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About the Author & Host

Dr. Jeff Williams – Fellow of the International Academy of Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine – Chiropractor in Amarillo, TX, Chiropractic Advocate, Author, Entrepreneur, Educator, Businessman, Marketer, and Healthcare Blogger & Vlogger

 

 

Bibliography

  • Harris I, T. A., Stanford R, (2018). “Lumbar spine fusion: what is the evidence?” Internal Med J.
  • Harris IA, S. V., Mittal R, Adie S, (2020). “Surgery for chronic musculoskeletal pain: the questions of evidence.” Pain 161(9): S95-S103.
  • Xu W, R. B., Luo W, Li Z, Gu R, (2020). “Is Lumbar Fusion Necessary for Chronic Low Back Pain Associated with Degenerative Disk Disease? A Meta-Analysis.” World Neurosurg 146: 298-306.